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Old 12-12-2020, 02:20 PM   #1
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Russian Trawler Update 2

Hi all,

So much time has passed and so much has happened. If you would like learn more about this post-Soviet adventure, read on!

So, I have had all the registration and government docs done. It is officially and legally my boat. Sweet! Oh! By the way...the previous owner forgot to mention a detail or two. Nothing too important. The three fire extinguishers are all inop. And in 2005 she exploded at the dock and sank. She sat in the bottom for three years and was resurrected in 2008. But sheís given sterling service these past 12 years, so hardly worth mentioning.
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Old 12-12-2020, 02:25 PM   #2
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Thatís a fantastic intro to what promises to be a very interesting thread.
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Old 12-12-2020, 02:30 PM   #3
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There’s not much to ‘ read on’ . So I have no clue where this story is going
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Old 12-12-2020, 02:35 PM   #4
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Anyway, in for a penny, in for a pound as the saying goes

Obviously I was wrong about the engine being original. It turns out that some of the cooling system components are from the original type, but the engine has been replaced with a D65.
This is actually sort of good news. The D65 is a military engine and in Soviet times that meant the best quality. It also meant it can go with no maintenance and can use just about anything sort of diesel-ish as fuel. Itís also got 20 more hp, at around 60.
Here is a brief tour:
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Old 12-12-2020, 02:44 PM   #5
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Some more photos of the boat in general, before I gutted the interior. Orientation seems to be problematic. Apologies in advance.

Ps, if you are confused, please check my previous posts for context.
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Old 12-12-2020, 02:53 PM   #6
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Keep on having fun. Looks good.
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Old 12-12-2020, 02:59 PM   #7
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Hard to believe that it was under water fir three years,
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Old 12-12-2020, 03:04 PM   #8
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I have a question about bilge pumps. When I asked the previous owner about them, he showed me a giant syringe. That was it. Nothing else. At first I thought it must be a joke, but it was not. Having taken the interior deck up, I start to understand. Under the floor is a steel grid, roughly 1m X .25m that is enclosed. Basically, each one would flood independently until it overflowed into the adjacent sections. I’m not sure how to compensate for that in terms of bailing. That being said, the bilge is completely dry and there are no through-holes in that section.
In the engine room, there is some water, most of it from when I decommissioned the sea strainer for winter. Most of what’s in the bilge there appears to be oil and grease. I can put a pump in below the floor there, but the engine room is not the lowest point on the boat. Anyway, I’d love to get your thoughts on how to proceed. Thanks in advance
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Old 12-12-2020, 03:12 PM   #9
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I love it. Was the "new" engine fitted after the sinking? Or did it just start right up after raising the boat?
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Old 12-12-2020, 03:53 PM   #10
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Atomic,
No rush but sometime I’d like all the info on the bower (anchor).
VERY interesting. I’m sure I’ve never seen one like that.

And who’s the girl in the blue hat your chasing around.
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Old 12-12-2020, 04:49 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
Atomic,
No rush but sometime Iíd like all the info on the bower (anchor).
VERY interesting. Iím sure Iíve never seen one like that.

And whoís the girl in the blue hat your chasing around.
It appears to be a standard Russian sea anchor design. якорь матросова If you want to google it. I think this one is 50kg, but havenít gotten close enough yet. By Christmas the water will be solid enough to lower the anchor onto it and have a closer look.

Blue hat is my ďwoman friendĒ
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Old 12-12-2020, 05:17 PM   #12
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Greetings,
Mr. TAG. Oh, and by the way...She sat on the bottom for three years...


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Old 12-12-2020, 05:18 PM   #13
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3 years buried in fresh water or salt water?
I hope you paid less that salvage value, maybe free if you move it out of the way. A real navigational hazard. LOL

Ideally, they would pay you.
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Old 12-12-2020, 05:36 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAtomicDog View Post
I have a question about bilge pumps. When I asked the previous owner about them, he showed me a giant syringe. That was it. Nothing else. At first I thought it must be a joke, but it was not. Having taken the interior deck up, I start to understand. Under the floor is a steel grid, roughly 1m X .25m that is enclosed. Basically, each one would flood independently until it overflowed into the adjacent sections. Iím not sure how to compensate for that in terms of bailing. That being said, the bilge is completely dry and there are no through-holes in that section.
In the engine room, there is some water, most of it from when I decommissioned the sea strainer for winter. Most of whatís in the bilge there appears to be oil and grease. I can put a pump in below the floor there, but the engine room is not the lowest point on the boat. Anyway, Iíd love to get your thoughts on how to proceed. Thanks in advance
In steel construction, small limber holes are usually made at the time of construction, because it's easier before the plating goes on. But they all are setup to drain to the lowest point. Without a drain point you have to take on a lot of water before the pump kicks on. And if your bilge alarm doesn't happen to be in the flooded section it won't go off before you have several inches of water thruout the bilge.
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Old 12-12-2020, 05:39 PM   #15
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It must have cost a few rubles to salvage. Divers, and a crane big enough the lift the boat full of water. In the US, you'd be looking at near a million.
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Old 12-12-2020, 11:22 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lepke View Post
In steel construction, small limber holes are usually made at the time of construction, because it's easier before the plating goes on. But they all are setup to drain to the lowest point. Without a drain point you have to take on a lot of water before the pump kicks on. And if your bilge alarm doesn't happen to be in the flooded section it won't go off before you have several inches of water thruout the bilge.
Thanks for this. I will check for limber holes. I hope they are there. I donít want to have to drill a dozen or so.

Regarding salvage costs, at that time in Russia I would be surprised if it cost $10k. No OSHA, no environmental impact studies, no insurance.

By the way, it was a propane explosion and it blew the deck off, as well as internal fittings that caused the boat to sink.

Fresh water, thankfully.
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Old 12-13-2020, 01:21 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
Atomic,
No rush but sometime Iíd like all the info on the bower (anchor).
VERY interesting. Iím sure Iíve never seen one like that...
Did a quick image search for stockless anchors, and it appears to be a Matrosov anchor:

Matrosov Anchor, HHP Anchor - Chongqing King-Sea Marine Equipment Co.,Ltd.
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Old 12-28-2020, 11:23 PM   #18
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Kinda looks like a small version of the yamal
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Old 12-29-2020, 05:26 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAtomicDog View Post
I have a question about bilge pumps. When I asked the previous owner about them, he showed me a giant syringe. That was it. Nothing else. At first I thought it must be a joke, but it was not. Having taken the interior deck up, I start to understand. Under the floor is a steel grid, roughly 1m X .25m that is enclosed. Basically, each one would flood independently until it overflowed into the adjacent sections. Iím not sure how to compensate for that in terms of bailing. That being said, the bilge is completely dry and there are no through-holes in that section.
In the engine room, there is some water, most of it from when I decommissioned the sea strainer for winter. Most of whatís in the bilge there appears to be oil and grease. I can put a pump in below the floor there, but the engine room is not the lowest point on the boat. Anyway, Iíd love to get your thoughts on how to proceed. Thanks in advance
Did you get an answer?
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Old 12-30-2020, 04:54 PM   #20
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@Alaskan Sea-Duction

Yes. Lepke responded. There are limber holes that run along the keel. Bilge pumps ordered.
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