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Old 10-27-2017, 12:54 PM   #21
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Wifey B: I'm not going to set off across an ocean in a 60 year old wooden boat.
Yeah, no problem. You should take a bunch of bags of concrete mix to tidy up the big hull leaks as they happen.

And 4 x of 1958 motors might get it interesting in the ER too.
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Old 10-27-2017, 01:35 PM   #22
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How about a converted ex-Navy patrol boat with a 2000 nmi range and likely room for much larger fuel tanks?



YP655


Love that boat. But price I think is too high and accommodations are, shall we say, spartan. Wouldn't be a hot charter boat I don't think.
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Old 10-27-2017, 01:40 PM   #23
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Wifey B: I'm not going to set off across an ocean in a 60 year old wooden boat.


Maybe this one then. It has a West System epoxy coating on the hull. I have been all over it and it is structurally near perfect. The owner wants to take it from North Carolina to the islands next month and I volunteered to crew with him.

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Old 10-27-2017, 02:10 PM   #24
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Maybe this one then. It has a West System epoxy coating on the hull. I have been all over it and it is structurally near perfect. The owner wants to take it from North Carolina to the islands next month and I volunteered to crew with him.

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Wifey B: I'll wait to hear from you after the trip.
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Old 10-27-2017, 02:10 PM   #25
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http://www.boats.com/power-boats/198.../#.WfODOZE8KhB

This might be exactly what the op is looking for. I believe price will be negotiable to be within his range.
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Old 10-27-2017, 02:18 PM   #26
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Wifey B: I'll wait to hear from you after the trip.


Yeah, well it's mission is to become a floating accommodation unit for housing recovery efforts. So for me it's worth while.

The boat just completed a 10 day trip from St. Petersburg FL to Wilmington without a single hitch. It was originally built as an offshore head boat but has been in private use for a while. Friend of mine bought it and has gone through everything. Its a good sea boat.
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Old 10-27-2017, 02:49 PM   #27
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Yeah, well it's mission is to become a floating accommodation unit for housing recovery efforts. So for me it's worth while.

The boat just completed a 10 day trip from St. Petersburg FL to Wilmington without a single hitch. It was originally built as an offshore head boat but has been in private use for a while. Friend of mine bought it and has gone through everything. Its a good sea boat.
Wifey B: That is very worth while. So, good sea boat but being taken off the sea and kept docked?

Hope it's very successful as recovery housing.
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Old 10-27-2017, 02:55 PM   #28
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I think the plan is to keep it at anchor and move it to needed areas as found necessary. When finished with hurricane duty my friend wants to put it in charter as a fishing or dive boat. Can sleep 10.
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Old 10-28-2017, 10:02 AM   #29
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An unusual combination. So, what ocean do you intend to cross and where do you hope to have it up for charter?
Atlantic. I need 1,800 range (plus 10% safety) for the longer stretch to the Azores from Bermuda.

To answer someone else's question, I have no intention of hosting a paying guest on a transatlantic passage. Charters would be New England in summer, maybe carribean in winter but my family is in Europe so I may move there to cruise the Western Isles of Scotland, and other areas of Scandinavia where I have more family.


With regards to my abilities, I have completed maybe 15,000 offshore miles in my current boat with the longest passage being 1,400 miles from NYC to Key West in November. But I'm getting old (62) and don't want to be doing a headsail change on the foredeck at night in 35 knots and 15 foot seas. So, I think power is the way to go.
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Old 10-28-2017, 11:41 AM   #30
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Atlantic. I need 1,800 range (plus 10% safety) for the longer stretch to the Azores from Bermuda.

To answer someone else's question, I have no intention of hosting a paying guest on a transatlantic passage. Charters would be New England in summer, maybe carribean in winter but my family is in Europe so I may move there to cruise the Western Isles of Scotland, and other areas of Scandinavia where I have more family.


With regards to my abilities, I have completed maybe 15,000 offshore miles in my current boat with the longest passage being 1,400 miles from NYC to Key West in November. But I'm getting old (62) and don't want to be doing a headsail change on the foredeck at night in 35 knots and 15 foot seas. So, I think power is the way to go.
You do know there are sailing vessels that are all power raising, furling, lowering, stowing sails...whatever the method?

Still think you are right at the limits for what you want to do and what your budget is.
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Old 10-28-2017, 04:55 PM   #31
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How about a converted ex-Navy patrol boat with a 2000 nmi range and likely room for much larger fuel tanks?

YP655
That boat is next to our home port. We’ve passed by several times and been onboard once briefly. It’s a very interesting boat, but quite a project.
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Old 10-28-2017, 06:03 PM   #32
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You do know there are sailing vessels that are all power raising, furling, lowering, stowing sails...whatever the method?



Still think you are right at the limits for what you want to do and what your budget is.


Yup. But what do you do when the electric headsail fuller quits at 3am on a windy night in 10' seas with the sail half in-half out. Been there done that and didn't get a tee shirt. Friends boat. I was crewing for him on a passage from Tampa to New Orleans one November many years ago. I got the pleasure of sitting cross legged on the pulpit untangling the mess by hand while every 10 seconds plunging deep in to the next wave. Only time I was ever seasick and that was just I scrambled back to the cockpit after the job was done.

I was in my 40's. no way I would do it in my 60's. ugh.
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Old 10-28-2017, 06:59 PM   #33
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What do you do when your single engine in your trawler quits?

Or your heart stops?

Gimme a break..... people always want to argue both sides of the reliability/ failure rate coin....then talk proper maintenance and backups...

So which is it?

Most sallors I know say roller furling is pretty dang reliable now if you use it correctly, and the electric winches as good as you maintain them....plus backup systems.
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Old 10-28-2017, 07:07 PM   #34
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I don't have a single engine trawler. And not having to climb out on a bowsprit at night sure mitigates the risk of a heart stoppage. At this age it is wise to reduce stress or risk. That's why I have a trawler, not a sailboat. Truth be known, I would prefer a sailboat but am realistic enough to know that is not a good choice for me..

Many people on this board have made the same decision.
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Old 10-29-2017, 01:23 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by 2savage View Post
Atlantic. I need 1,800 range (plus 10% safety) for the longer stretch to the Azores from Bermuda.

To answer someone else's question, I have no intention of hosting a paying guest on a transatlantic passage. Charters would be New England in summer, maybe carribean in winter but my family is in Europe so I may move there to cruise the Western Isles of Scotland, and other areas of Scandinavia where I have more family.


With regards to my abilities, I have completed maybe 15,000 offshore miles in my current boat with the longest passage being 1,400 miles from NYC to Key West in November. But I'm getting old (62) and don't want to be doing a headsail change on the foredeck at night in 35 knots and 15 foot seas. So, I think power is the way to go.

If you go old viking route cross atlantic longest trip is about 600nm? fuel tank-fuel tank.

NBs

Cross this route 5 minutes this No limits boats video


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Old 10-29-2017, 02:09 AM   #36
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N62 Gray Matter is very reasonably priced now. It seems to me that is about the cost you will end up at after buying an old boat and getting it refitted and upgraded to be seaworthy for ocean crossing in comfort.

http://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1997/...d#.WfV7XxOCxmM

Its an early hull number but Mark & Christine did a whole bunch of upgrades. Although I have not spent much time on board, it is going to be about as turnkey as you will get for a long distance capable boat. Their trip to Australia from the PNW was relatively easy, and they were at my marina for about 2.5 years. The boat could not stay here much longer (3 years is the limit) without attracting a total of 15% of value in taxes. NZ is easier to stay longer, but if you are not living/working there then its difficult to use it as much as you would like, and no doubt is at least partly why they have priced to sell.
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Old 10-29-2017, 05:19 AM   #37
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300k is a tough one if your thinking of charter work plus ocean crossing.
We have a Cheoy Lee 66 which is pretty much capable of most stuff except high latitude work. The CL66's were crossing oceans long before Nordhavn invented the ocean capable boat.
Some qualities they possess include,
Simple rugged engines (Screaming Jimmies in my case)
Large full headroom engine room, 2 gennies, lots of tankage for fuel, water and waste.
Built like little ships. Commercial grade bits. Proper berthing for 10.
Before anyone goes nuts on the Detroits re fuel consumption, the figures we regularly and reliably get are max speed 13 knots, no idea how much fuel that uses, lots I guess.
10 knot cruise, 37lph (10 gallon per hour for the Yanks among us )
7.5 to 8 knots this is our typical cruise speed approx at 1000 to 1100 rpm, at this cruise we return 22lph, just under 6 gph. This included genny burn as well.
Given we have a lot of livable room and seaworthyness it's not too bad.

Prices for early models are just in your range. Early flat sheer boats are not as pretty, however the post 1983 boats had more sheer which looks better.

I personally would cross the charter bit off your list, mainly because you rarely make money and a boat should be in survey for charter work which costs.
Also it opens up a much larger range of boat to choose from.
We have 4 people living on board our 66 and it works well for us.
If it's just one or two of you a Nordy 46 is hard to beat. Just a bit slow for me.
Here a pic of us in the Southern Ocean off the bottom of Tasmania. Naiad's are our best friend down here.
Click on this if you need some inspiration.
https://www.nzonscreen.com/title/bef...ons-begin-1999
Bravado is our exact sistership built and fitted out in the same year.
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Old 10-31-2017, 03:45 PM   #38
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Wonder no one mentioned a European boat like the one I operate.
Bought this Dutch made 2003 Altena 49’ two years ago in NC to cross the Atlantic.

Many of those Dutch boats are seaworthy (CE-A) and equipped with long range tanks, hydraulic stabilzers, big water tanks and everything else you need. And, one big advantage, if you‘re able to get one from 2002 upwards, they are fully insulated with 2“ rockwool and/or foam and also double glazed windows. And they‘re steel, not plastic
Here you find an actual example www.boat24.com/310233

Two years ago I didn‘t find the right one here in Europe, but luckily one in the US.

So I still do explore the US waters (last winter the Keys and Cuba, this winter the Bahamas) before sailing her over the Atlantic to the Mediterranean Sea.

Just an idea to think out of the box beside all the Nordhavens and Krogens.
Good luck and regards from Tyrolia, Jan
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Old 11-01-2017, 01:46 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stornoway7 View Post
300k is a tough one if your thinking of charter work plus ocean crossing.
We have a Cheoy Lee 66 which is pretty much capable of most stuff except high latitude work. The CL66's were crossing oceans long before Nordhavn invented the ocean capable boat.
Some qualities they possess include,
Simple rugged engines (Screaming Jimmies in my case)
Large full headroom engine room, 2 gennies, lots of tankage for fuel, water and waste.
Built like little ships. Commercial grade bits. Proper berthing for 10.
Before anyone goes nuts on the Detroits re fuel consumption, the figures we regularly and reliably get are max speed 13 knots, no idea how much fuel that uses, lots I guess.
10 knot cruise, 37lph (10 gallon per hour for the Yanks among us )
7.5 to 8 knots this is our typical cruise speed approx at 1000 to 1100 rpm, at this cruise we return 22lph, just under 6 gph. This included genny burn as well.
Given we have a lot of livable room and seaworthyness it's not too bad.

Prices for early models are just in your range. Early flat sheer boats are not as pretty, however the post 1983 boats had more sheer which looks better.

I personally would cross the charter bit off your list, mainly because you rarely make money and a boat should be in survey for charter work which costs.
Also it opens up a much larger range of boat to choose from.
We have 4 people living on board our 66 and it works well for us.
If it's just one or two of you a Nordy 46 is hard to beat. Just a bit slow for me.
Here a pic of us in the Southern Ocean off the bottom of Tasmania. Naiad's are our best friend down here.
Click on this if you need some inspiration.
https://www.nzonscreen.com/title/bef...ons-begin-1999
Bravado is our exact sistership built and fitted out in the same year.


That is a beautiful video. Its very awakening to what a traveling life can be.
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Old 11-02-2017, 05:51 AM   #40
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"Charters would be New England in summer, maybe carribean in winter but my family is in Europe so I may move there to cruise the Western Isles of Scotland, and other areas of Scandinavia where I have more family."

Most of the listed countries have laws requiring boats to pass their local inspections to obtain a local charter license , and most have a requirement for a licensed captain.This can require years of operation in a specific area.

Look up a USCG sub chapter T build requirements , and remember the Euros will have similar , but different , requirements.

Chartering anywhere you will be stepping on local toes , so expect the locals to not be easy , for docking or passenger loading.
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