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Old 04-02-2019, 10:05 PM   #21
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Oh no...

My wife and I looked at boats in the 60-75' range for two years before buying a 64' 2002 Grand Banks Aleutian.

If you do not have any recent experience on a boat of this size the insurance company will require you have a qualified captain on board for some period of time. Ours was 100 hour requirement. The captain must certify your capability to safely handle the boat to the insurance company before they release the requirement to have a Coast Guard certified captain on board.

Handling the 64' GB with only a bow thruster and twin diesels takes a little practice. The boat responds very well in all situations. The biggest challenge is reading winds and currents and knowing what to do when. Again this takes practice which takes time.

The biggest challenge however is understanding and maintaining all of the systems and components of the boat. This is a steep learning curve because if you don't know how it works you can't identify and fix a problem.

My wife and I spent almost 2 years shaking down, repairing and upgrading the boat. With the exception of a couple of months in the northern Bahamas we were cruising the east coast from the Chesapeake to Key West and spending a fair amount of time and monies in boatyards along the east coast and immersing ourselves in boating courses, discussions and literature.

We are now well into the Caribbean (Antigua) with confidence in our boat, our knowledge and our skills that we can enjoy this part if life's journey.

There is still much to experience and learn but I feel we can now work from a strong foundation.

Good luck with your endeavors.
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Old 04-03-2019, 05:54 AM   #22
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I have to disagree with the experience issue when relaterd to size of vessels.


It's more,sports user (fishing, skiing, tubing, etc) or day tripper versus long distance cruiser.


I have many friends that have boated locally for 50 years and can boat handle well and understand "local" boating pretty well.


But when discussing long distance cruising "out of their area"....they are clueless.


Now... some do expand their knowledge base by reading...but the vast majority are too busy with other life issues to really even know what they don't know.


From teaching captains licensing, it REALLY showed me how little even local charterboat "professional" catains know about cruising and boating in general.


So expect to learn at a rate that seems like drinking from a fire hose.


For every "go for it" discussion and story about a total newbie getting away with successful cruising.... there is a sad story mirroring the same.


As long as you know there is a lot to absorb, you will be fine....it's not hard stuff....just a lot.
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Old 04-03-2019, 10:40 AM   #23
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For every "go for it" discussion and story about a total newbie getting away with successful cruising.... there is a sad story mirroring the same.


As long as you know there is a lot to absorb, you will be fine....it's not hard stuff....just a lot.
Wifey B: That's what drives me wild at sailor's forums where they talk about the person with no experience sailing around the world. Duh, the one who drowned along the way doesn't ever post.

Not generally do failed efforts result in death but there are many sad stories. Did the wind gust of reality already blow ohno3kids away? Was he really looking for guidance or a cheering section? i felt like his one post responding to us really showed he was listening but now that we haven't heard from him in 10 days, I wonder. Where or where have you gone?

If you really want to do this, start immersing yourself in the learning process today.
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Old 04-03-2019, 12:35 PM   #24
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So you hit one of my pet peeves, Brentwood, where is that. People deal with info and assume some one in New Zealand or England or Alaska know what the person is talking about, but to the person it is clear - "Brentwood, you know, Brentwood, everyone knows where it is." I googled it assuming it is in the States, which it apparently is, but also in Burnaby BC, just saying. I don't mean this in a heavy handed way, but the reason I googled it was to add some contectuality to my advise.

First I agree, don't settle on what you think you might need, but start your journey into boating now. If you live in the Brentwood in Washington DC then go get yourself 28 - 30 express cruiser or trawler and start the adventure now. You will find much to learn, from the ever fun anchor discussions, gas versus diesel, etc but none of the information is difficult to learn, there's just so much of it. Two burner stove or three or four burner stove, propane to run your stove or all electric. If all electric how are you going to get your power, shore only, gen set, fuel cell, solar, wind turbine, water turbine, and the list goes on and on and on.

The boat you purchase now will help inform you on what is important later, is a trawler too slow, do you want something faster, can your wallet or your brain handle the economics of a faster large boat. If you are considering 65 feet and metaphorically speaking want to follow along the lines of the Fleming Venture, and if so do you really want to do much boating in open water, away from the coast, thinking larger rolling waves, storms to put the fear of god into you, and basically the same view for days at end?

You think you know the answers to the above questions but experience will modify your vision. So focus on the experience you can begin to acquire now. But if you enjoy the lifestyle, you will thoroughly enjoy the learning.

And lastly, after watching many Fleming Venture blog videos of course I'd love a 65 footer. But I thought I'd give you my reasoning for not wanting one after all (please note, I don't have the money for one and all its ensuing costs). For me and my wife, having only two to handle a boat that size is a no-go. There is no way as I age that I would not hire people to run the boat. But for me, running the boat, the galley, the everything is part of boating. Yes I would stand watches at three and four in the morning (ex Navy).

Julia Andrews of Sound of Music fame used to own a large yacht with crew. She would send the boat out from England to arrive in Campbell River BC. Then Julia would fly out from Jolly Old E and meet up with the boat to go to Desolation Sound, the Broughtons, Alaska, etc. For me that isn't the kind of boating I want to do, I would want to bring the boat from England to Campbell River, but for Julia, I'm sure she was thrilled with her experience.

Do I want to hire people to work the boat, for me and my thinking, if I was hiring, a minimal of 3 would be best on a 65 boat. But I don't want to be involved with business, and hiring and being responsible for another person's well being in a fiduciary relationship is business. Boating for me is a "no business" event. What if I don't like one or more of the people, what if they don't like me?

Where am I going to moor such a large boat, in my part of the world, this is a real issue. And I don't want to moor my boat far enough away from the cruising areas I enjoy so that getting there and returning is a hassle (translation: time). I want to be almost there in my car, then finish it off on the boat.

Many marinas have limited space for larger vessels, much more so where I am, maybe not so much where you are. So "for me," smaller is better than bigger.

And this last issue is something that only some will relate to, but its my connection with the ocean underway on smaller boats. When I took a ten day cruise from Baltimore, I and my family were on the 10th deck or something like that, spent most of the day enclosed or really unable to visually connect to the ocean.

On the Canadian destroyer I was on back oh so many decades ago, I was on a ship with no portholes. Unless you were on the bridge, in so many ways you weren't connected to the water:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMCS_C...diere_1964.jpg

But when canoeing, sailing boats under 40 feet and currently on my 29 foot express cruiser, I'm only five or six feet above the water, I feel connected. I'm not sure I would have that same connectedness on a 65 foot vessel. This feeling is somewhat akin to those who prefer to cruise at 7 knots, they want to see what is going on, not feel they are some kind of metaphorical Interstate trying to get somewhere fast.

But this is me and not you, you need to find out who you are.
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Old 04-03-2019, 02:21 PM   #25
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To the OP, I don't hear about it as much here, as on the RV forums, but it you are thinking about going from no boat to "full time" make sure that you have an 'exit' plan.

Maybe you will find that a 60' - 65' boat to be everything you ever dreamed of. Or, maybe said boat will be too big or too small, or maybe either you or your wife will tire of the live-aboard life style after 6 months, 1 year, 5 years, whatever.

Sometimes when we follow our dreams, real life exceeds our wildest expectations, and I hope that is the case for you and your wife. It would be prudent, however, to have a plan in case this doesn't happen.

Jim
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Old 04-03-2019, 02:35 PM   #26
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To the OP, I don't hear about it as much here, as on the RV forums, but it you are thinking about going from no boat to "full time" make sure that you have an 'exit' plan.
Part of that is one's own tolerance of risk. I'm in agreement with you. I always have an exit plan, a contingency plan. Always a Plan B. I wouldn't be comfortable otherwise. Yet, I know people who never consider the "what if's" and just merrily go on their way.
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Old 04-03-2019, 02:35 PM   #27
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One more thing. In the first post you write, "My hope in 2 years is to (1) sell our house and buy a 15-20 year old 60'-65' trawler at $400k-$500k, (2) pay a seasoned captain to train me for 3-4 months."

Maybe its just an oversight in your post, but when I take my powerboat classes (I will be moving up from a sailboat to a boat with twin inboards), my wife will be taking several of the courses together with me. Whatever boat we buy, most likely a 35' - 40' express cruiser, I want her to be comfortable on board.

Although I may take additional maintenance course(s), my expectations is that she learn to drive the boat and learn to navigate as well.

Jim
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Old 04-03-2019, 03:54 PM   #28
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Bad idea, unless $$ is absolutely no issue.Putting all that money into something you'll use for 3-5 years at best and watch it depreciate while spending $20k or more in maintenance and dockage is not wise. Like the other sane blogs advise, get a 30-42 MAX. Remember at marinas, its not all about the footage charge, its tough to get any slip with a big boat without well advance notice. And these Dockmasters and dock hands get greased pretty good, as it should be, thats just the way it goes. So get ready $$$$
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Old 04-03-2019, 05:14 PM   #29
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One more thing. In the first post you write, "My hope in 2 years is to (1) sell our house and buy a 15-20 year old 60'-65' trawler at $400k-$500k, (2) pay a seasoned captain to train me for 3-4 months."

Maybe its just an oversight in your post, but when I take my powerboat classes (I will be moving up from a sailboat to a boat with twin inboards), my wife will be taking several of the courses together with me. Whatever boat we buy, most likely a 35' - 40' express cruiser, I want her to be comfortable on board.

Although I may take additional maintenance course(s), my expectations is that she learn to drive the boat and learn to navigate as well.

Jim
Captain Wifey B was just as much involved as I was. Every course together, every day of on board training together.
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Old 04-03-2019, 05:28 PM   #30
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Bad idea, unless $$ is absolutely no issue.Putting all that money into something you'll use for 3-5 years at best and watch it depreciate while spending $20k or more in maintenance and dockage is not wise. Like the other sane blogs advise, get a 30-42 MAX. Remember at marinas, its not all about the footage charge, its tough to get any slip with a big boat without well advance notice. And these Dockmasters and dock hands get greased pretty good, as it should be, thats just the way it goes. So get ready $$$$
We don't know the rest of his financial. Maybe the home he wants in the future can be purchased for $200k and he has that in the bank. I absolutely don't agree with the 30-42' Max as if I'm going to use it as my home I want more. I want to be able to invite many guests. When we did the loop, we always had 5-7 aboard. You do need to get dockage for big boats in advance, those over 200'. There's no problem finding dockage for 50-70'. Only challenge is monthly or more in winter in Fort Lauderdale but that's regardless of size. As to dockmasters and dock hands, if $5 or $10 or even $20 is a serious issue then one shouldn't own a 65' boat. The term "greased" is derogatory and makes it sound illicit in some way.

My bigger caution on a 65' is the amount of work required and one must be prepared to do it themselves or pay to get it done. If we were doing it ourselves, we'd have a smaller boat than that.

That's where something doesn't work in that model equation though. If we say:
-I can't live on less than 60'.
-I'm not going to do the work all myself on a 60'+
-I'm not going to pay others to do the work

Then we must compromise on one of those three issues as they're mutually exclusive. If we compromise then we must deal with the consequences.
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Old 04-06-2019, 06:03 AM   #31
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Folks dreaming of a big boat should find a charter operation and volunteer to scrub the boat and clean it , for free.

Keeping a boat up depends on its size and complexity.

A bloat boat may feel more home like , but 3 stories high with an oxygen tent on top is lots of area to scrub.!!
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