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Old 09-12-2018, 03:30 PM   #141
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I'd go one step further with the water jugs. Frozen gallon jugs will keep your fridge or freezer cool for a while. If you are lucky enough to get power back in a few days, you might not have to toss everything in your fridge.
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Old 09-12-2018, 03:31 PM   #142
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If you're still in Northwest Creek you're in good hands...I was there for Mathew and while each storm is different I was very impressed with the work the staff did to keep all safe. Key was running long lines for each boat across the fairway to pilings on the other side to keep boats in their spot (fore & aft) for a big surge. They took all the electrical meters off the pedestals and when I got back to the boat 3 days later they had all back together and operational.

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Old 09-12-2018, 03:33 PM   #143
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It is incredible to think how powerful is a storm surge of flowing water.
I was out at our slip today, added some lines and put out bumpers. And I was looking up and imagining a wall of water high above my head and it was incomprehensible how anything like that could happen, but it does. Such an height of flowing water and high winds, nothing at our marina could survive, especially since the docks are not floating.

Lines would snap, boats would smash each other and pull out the docks, the motion of the water would rip the pilings right out of the sea bed.
Floating docks can float right off their pilings. Breakwaters that are too low let in huge breaking waves into the harbors.
Simply catastrophic damages, everything swept away into a jumbled mass of debris, which everyone can see happens as their are plenty of pictures from other bad storms.

At the marina I am at now, Hurricane Isabel lifted and carried away boats, and for a long time, years, one sat forlorn on the far shore high and dry.
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Old 09-12-2018, 03:34 PM   #144
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A significant percentage of the time, local water is not potable after a hurricane or flooding. Also, used containers, water bottles or milk jugs, have a greatly increased risk of bacteria developing. Bottled water is not going to cost you boat bucks. To me, it's worth the expenditure.
And this is why we have different boats to choose from. Everyone has different wants and backgrounds.

If folks are able to easily get it, so be it. I'm talking about for those who are in areas that have already sold out and they aren't likely to get another delivery, or they have to stand around in a line for hours hoping there will still be some left by the time their turn comes.

I said to fill containers BEFORE the storm gets there, NOT afterwards. I grew up in the country on well water that had to be run through a filter and softener. We caught rainwater for drinking water because even though our well water was safe to drink if often had a not so great taste.
I also said to rinse containers with bleach water before use and to treat stored water with bleach. These are time proven methods for dealing with somewhat iffy water---let alone US tap water sources. If someone would rather hope that the 1-2 cases of water they managed to grab at the 7-11 Kwik Pak store will last them a week or possibly more, or not be able to use their toilet during the DAYS of rain/wind this storm is forecast to deliver, more power to them.

For those who have freshwater tanks on their boats but NOT a watermaker. Do you not treat your tank? What do you use? I've always used plain old household bleach, and we let it set for atleast a day to let the smell dissipate somewhat, and then were perfectly comfortable to use it for cooking, coffee, brushing teeth, and yes drinking, of course we'd rather be able to run it through a Brita pitcher to make the taste less bleachy. And this was on a 35 year old boat's water tank!
Many cruisers catch rainwater run-off from decks and cabin tops and funnel it into freshwater tanks....to drink. These folks can be at sea for weeks/months or in 3rd world areas where you don't want tap water to enter your body at any cost short of death.. They treat their tanks after each natural "fill".
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Old 09-12-2018, 03:39 PM   #145
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I'd go one step further with the water jugs. Frozen gallon jugs will keep your fridge or freezer cool for a while. If you are lucky enough to get power back in a few days, you might not have to toss everything in your fridge.
Exactly.
And if you have a really good ice chest (or several) you can pack food in layers for use in meals and work your way through them in a way that you can have "fresh" meals vs having to go canned goods almost immediately due to opening the fridge freezer and losing its cool.
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Old 09-12-2018, 03:45 PM   #146
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And this is why we have different boats to choose from. Everyone has different wants and backgrounds.

I said to fill containers BEFORE the storm gets there, NOT afterwards. I grew up in the country on well water that had to be run through a filter and softener. We caught rainwater for drinking water because even though our well water was safe to drink if often had a not so great taste.
I also said to rinse containers with bleach water before use and to treat stored water with bleach. These are time proven methods for dealing with somewhat iffy water---let alone US tap water sources. If someone would rather hope that the 1-2 cases of water they managed to grab at the 7-11 Kwik Pak store will last them a week or possibly more, or not be able to use their toilet during the DAYS of rain/wind this storm is forecast to deliver, more power to them.

For those who have freshwater tanks on their boats but NOT a watermaker. Do you not treat your tank? What do you use? I've always used plain old household bleach, and we let it set for atleast a day to let the smell dissipate somewhat, and then were perfectly comfortable to use it for cooking, coffee, brushing teeth, and yes drinking, of course we'd rather be able to run it through a Brita pitcher to make the taste less bleachy. And this was on a 35 year old boat's water tank!
Many cruisers catch rainwater run-off from decks and cabin tops and funnel it into freshwater tanks....to drink. These folks can be at sea for weeks/months or in 3rd world areas where you don't want tap water to enter your body at any cost short of death.. They treat their tanks after each natural "fill".
I have a 70 gallon fresh water SS tank, and all copper lines. Honestly, the water is always good. I have never had bad water. I fill it with city water which has residual chlorine, and those copper pipes kill all bacteria and viruses. I never have to treat that water or filter it.
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Old 09-12-2018, 03:47 PM   #147
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I have a 70 gallon fresh water SS tank, and all copper lines. Honestly, the water is always good. I have never had bad water. I fill it with city water which has residual chlorine, and those copper pipes kill all bacteria and viruses. I never have to treat that water or filter it.
How frequently do you use it? Do you drain the tank when you know it will be a while before you'll use it again? Do you let your boat set for weeks/months at a time? Our boat could go for months without us needing the freshwater system as we used it for day trips far more than overnighting. Again everyone is different.

When I lived in the Keys, I'd see probably a dozen "boaties" a year come into the hospital with some form of live-aboard mold/fungus issue. You get so many who fall for the romantic idea of "chucking it all and running away to the islands and living on a boat". Problem is they don't realize that when you live-aboard you become responsible for many hygienic things that you took for granted living in a house with a city water supply and septic system, not to mention the oppressive heat and humidity that makes boats living on the hook like Nature's own pitre dish!
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Old 09-12-2018, 03:58 PM   #148
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I could see the power outages lasting a long time. With the soggy ground and high winds lots of trees will be blowing over. That will obviously take down power lines and also close roads so repair crews can't get around as well.
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Old 09-12-2018, 04:10 PM   #149
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Thinking there it will be tough to find marinas able to pump fuel during the trip south this fall.


At this point, the least of any of our worries. We need to get through the next few days safely.
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Old 09-12-2018, 04:29 PM   #150
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Key was running long lines for each boat across the fairway to pilings on the other side to keep boats in their spot (fore & aft) for a big surge.

Unfortunately, the owner has stopped the staff from doing this any more. He argues it never did any good. Lines would stretch and not keep the boats off the docks. We are all a little pissed about that, but what can ya’ do? Personally, I think he just got tired of paying overtime for the staff to rig it and take it all down after. He’s a bit of a jerk like that.

They still pull the meters and breakers though.
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Old 09-12-2018, 04:33 PM   #151
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Current forecasts call for 20 to 30" of rain in the Myrtle Beach area. 10 to 20" throughout SC and parts of NC and 6 to 10" as far west as Charlotte. One argument those choosing to ride the storm out are using is the inability to get back to their home anytime soon after the hurricane. That's a valid concern, although I have a hard time saying a greater concern than being safe during the hurricane. I guess some of it depends on how sure you are your house can handle the storm and you have food and drink for up to a month.
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Old 09-12-2018, 05:03 PM   #152
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Thinking there it will be tough to find marinas able to pump fuel during the trip south this fall.


At this point, the least of any of our worries. We need to get through the next few days safely.
I wouldn't sweat that. If you haven't already, become a member of ActiveCaptain. Its a great site that members contribute local knowledge to. Often times area marinas and docks will also contribute. I would imagine a boat your size could easily pass through N&S Carolina with your onboard tankage. If need be a couple plastic 55 gallon drums of fuel onboard should give you plenty of reserve. No marinas and other infrastructure might be another issue entirely if you don't like anchoring at night or if you have any major issues.
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Old 09-12-2018, 05:04 PM   #153
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Our home in SWFL was on the left side of Irma last year. The canal out back went empty in less than two hours.
Make sure your lines can withstand extremely low tide as well as high.
Good luck.
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Old 09-12-2018, 06:23 PM   #154
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What’s the prognosis for Hilton Head? My wife has an older relative who refuses to leave his home on HH. Son and daughter in Atlanta have not had luck getting him to leave.

Last time I was there during high tide the water was basically at his back patio/dock, which might be about 3’ off the ground. Seems like the storm surge from Florence could cause him big problems right? That and the lack of electricity for a week or so would be hard on an 85 year old man.
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Old 09-12-2018, 06:33 PM   #155
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How frequently do you use it? Do you drain the tank when you know it will be a while before you'll use it again? Do you let your boat set for weeks/months at a time? Our boat could go for months without us needing the freshwater system as we used it for day trips far more than overnighting. Again everyone is different.

When I lived in the Keys, I'd see probably a dozen "boaties" a year come into the hospital with some form of live-aboard mold/fungus issue. You get so many who fall for the romantic idea of "chucking it all and running away to the islands and living on a boat". Problem is they don't realize that when you live-aboard you become responsible for many hygienic things that you took for granted living in a house with a city water supply and septic system, not to mention the oppressive heat and humidity that makes boats living on the hook like Nature's own pitre dish!

I only drain it for the winter.
We use it everytime we take the boat out.
We wash up with it, shower with it, cook with it, sometimes drink it. We use it just like we do our house water.

I every so often fill it up right from the slip dock.
The kids love to run the water hose in the boat, they use the water more than us but for play time. So it is us 2 grandparents, our kids, their 3 kids typically using the boat.

Honestly, copper sterilizes water, google it.
Most of my water system is copper pipe and brass fittings.
Our boat water has never smelled or tasted bad.
http://www.investmentwatchblog.com/c...hin-two-hours/


Copper…plain old Copper kills viruses and bacteria on contact!!! Copper pipes and pennies too???

EPA registers copper-containing alloy products

On February 29, 2008, EPA registered five copper-containing alloy products. The registration allows the registrant, the Copper Development Association (CDA) to market these products with a claim that copper, when used in accordance with the label, “kills 99.9% of bacteria within two hours.” This Web page explains the conditions of the registration and provides information on the pesticidal claims.
http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/factsh...y-products.htm


I have noticed boats with plastic water systems, the water can be foul. Turn on the water on one for sale, and the stench was unbearable. And if the water system lets in any light, that's bad as algae will grow. I have seen a few boats with clearish opaque tubing.
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Old 09-12-2018, 06:40 PM   #156
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What’s the prognosis for Hilton Head? My wife has an older relative who refuses to leave his home on HH. Son and daughter in Atlanta have not had luck getting him to leave.

Last time I was there during high tide the water was basically at his back patio/dock, which might be about 3’ off the ground. Seems like the storm surge from Florence could cause him big problems right? That and the lack of electricity for a week or so would be hard on an 85 year old man.
Hilton Head is very much in the "We don't know" area. There is some greater degree of certainty as the storm hits and then moves south to Myrtle Beach. However, beyond that there is still a great deal of uncertainty as to how far it continues or when it turns inland and as to how much power it has as it moves south of Myrtle Beach. It may well not be known until Friday or Saturday. Hilton Head most likely to get 4 to 5 inches of rain and 2 to 4' of surge but it could easily be less or more. Charleston could get hit hard or escape with minimal damage.
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Old 09-12-2018, 07:04 PM   #157
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Threat from wind is definitely reduced from where it was (at this time only 115 mph) but threat of surge and threat of flooding is still very high.
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Old 09-12-2018, 07:10 PM   #158
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They were saying (weather people) they saw 83' waves out there. Measurements taken by a satellite. That's a little steep. I wonder of there are any weather buoys out there when it gets closer.
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Old 09-12-2018, 07:59 PM   #159
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Thought some of you might be interested in this video I made in our lock protected lagoon neighborhood during Matthew. And yes, I did get well panned for a) staying and b)going out in the middle of it! I will admit that when I tried to go out a second time and stuff started bouncing off the roof of the SUV, I quickly turned back!

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Old 09-12-2018, 09:08 PM   #160
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Last time I looked the two things that stuck in my mind were the time to landfall and the spread in the models. It seems the time to landfall is longer now than it was this morning. Maybe she's backing up? Kidding.

The models are far tighter than they were a day or so ago but not as close as I expected by now. There is still room for adjustment. Not expecting much but maybe a little. Hoping for a little that helps.
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