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Old 12-27-2017, 06:55 PM   #21
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I only start my Cats if we're heading out. I start them when I get to the boat and usually we're out of the slip within 7-10 minutes.


Other than that they will sit for months and fire right up within a few seconds when I do crank them up.
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Old 12-27-2017, 06:57 PM   #22
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My engine builder (JD) says not to idle the engine without load for more than five minutes. We time to leave the berth within five minutes of engine starting, and run at high idle speed (1100 to 1400 RPM) leaving for 15 minutes before reaching cruising speed (1800 RPM). Maximum speed is reached at 2200.
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Old 12-27-2017, 07:09 PM   #23
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Umm, if you're not leaving the berth, best not to start engine{s} unless the dock's cleats can hold while the engine is engaged with the propeller so there is a load. If not reaching the engine up to operating temperature for some time, you ....
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Old 12-27-2017, 07:39 PM   #24
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https://www.boatingmag.com/boats/how...-diesel-engine

Above is an article on winterizing your marine diesel engine(s). It doesn't recommend starting your engine periodically. It sounds like the proper strategy is to winterize the engine (and systems) and let it sit.

If you don't want to winterize it and cheat by occasionally starting it that is another issue. It doesn't sound like that would work. Continual usage during the winter would be a better strategy, IMHO.

To avoid condensation keep your tank full over the winter. Treat it with a biocide/stabilizer and don't start it until next season. Bleed fuel lines and replace filters. It also recommends changing the oil before storing for the winter.

That's my takeaway from the article. I suggest you read it for yourself. Always better than listening to others.
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Old 12-27-2017, 07:43 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
This old chestnut is as bad as discussing anchors or stern thrusters. If you canít be bothered to read the reams of blather about this topic in the search function, go have a nice rum or go for a walk until the urge to write some anecdotal nonsense about your defining moments in boating goes away. Happy New Year!
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Old 12-28-2017, 07:20 AM   #26
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Da Book rules.

Get a copy of the maint manual for your engine.(It should already be onboad.)

Read what the mfg sez about storing the engine.

"Out of service for over 30 days" is usually covered .

Out of service is NOT winterizing, which is usually a far larger procedure.

While Da Book is king , many folks do not know the next time the boat will be used.

I have always thought an ether cold weather starting device could be used with fogging fluid as a protection on shutdown.

We only start the engine when ready to depart , give it 30-60 seconds and get underway at idle.
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Old 12-28-2017, 09:22 AM   #27
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I advise my local guys (NC) where boats are mostly left in the water over the winter to start their engine up maybe once a month to get oil smeared around in cylinder bores and to knock any corrosion off valves. Just start them up and raise idle to say 800 for a couple minutes. No need to warm all the way up as dockside that simply will not happen.

I have seen rusted cylinder bores and rusty valves. I don't worry about the bearings, or engine sludging up or fuel dilution in a few five minute runs.

Very important on Detroit two strokes as a few cylinders will really breath when sitting. A little block heat on the DD's solves the liner corrosion issue.

If boat is fully mothballed for the winter, then don't worry about it. Usually up north the air is super dry in the winter and the corrosion issue is much less.

Down here we get wild swings in temp and humidity during the winter. When a warm front comes, right before is a good time to get a little heat in the engine. Otherwise when the warm air comes in, engine looks like a cold beer in August. Dripping wet.

Again, block heat helps but the arctic 1000w units are super overkill. No need to keep it 120F. 250w will keep it 10-20F above ambient and condensation will not happen.
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Old 12-28-2017, 09:36 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by dirtdoc1 View Post
https://www.boatingmag.com/boats/how...-diesel-engine That's my takeaway from the article. I suggest you read it for yourself. Always better than listening to others.
Humm, drain the fuel lines and use Stanadyne purchased through Defender the article says. Along with a few other odd statements and not saying for what weather the undefined motor is being "winterized" - maybe indeed XS's chestnuts be rested.
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Old 12-28-2017, 09:39 AM   #29
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I advise my local guys (NC) where boats are mostly left in the water over the winter to start their engine up maybe once a month to get oil smeared around in cylinder bores and to knock any corrosion off valves. Just start them up and raise idle to say 800 for a couple minutes. No need to warm all the way up as dockside that simply will not happen.

I have seen rusted cylinder bores and rusty valves. I don't worry about the bearings, or engine sludging up or fuel dilution in a few five minute runs.

Very important on Detroit two strokes as a few cylinders will really breath when sitting. A little block heat on the DD's solves the liner corrosion issue.

If boat is fully mothballed for the winter, then don't worry about it. Usually up north the air is super dry in the winter and the corrosion issue is much less.

Down here we get wild swings in temp and humidity during the winter. When a warm front comes, right before is a good time to get a little heat in the engine. Otherwise when the warm air comes in, engine looks like a cold beer in August. Dripping wet.

Again, block heat helps but the arctic 1000w units are super overkill. No need to keep it 120F. 250w will keep it 10-20F above ambient and condensation will not happen.
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Old 12-28-2017, 09:45 AM   #30
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Down here we get wild swings in temp and humidity during the winter.

You got that right! We moved from Manteo to Morehead City last year on a 72 degree day in mid February!

We run our motor up to full temp several times over the winter... because we go boating in NC :-) Not exactly the same thing for the same reason as the OP, but hey, it works for us.
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Old 12-29-2017, 06:54 AM   #31
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"Very important on Detroit two strokes as a few cylinders will really breath when sitting. A little block heat on the DD's solves the liner corrosion issue."

Our solution was to replace the gaskets on the air box covers , to make removal/replacement a 5 min job.

Spraying fogging fluid into each cylinder bore , a spin with the starter and respray the cylinders where the piston was in the way works here for soggy FL summer layup.

All that fogging fluid makes a bunch of smoke on engine restart after 6 months , but there is no white smoke on following startups , so the cylinders have not rusted.

The dry stack exhaust is sealed , and the blower intake also gets covered .

Nothing will stop changes in air pressure from the engine , but at least there is no breeze thru it.

Summer layup is as important as winter layup, 6 months of non use is not what DD's were built for.
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Old 12-29-2017, 10:21 AM   #32
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FF- By sealing stack, covering blower suction and fogging airbox you should have no problem with rusting liners. Kudos.
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Old 12-30-2017, 07:47 AM   #33
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"FF- By sealing stack, covering blower suction and fogging airbox you should have no problem with rusting liners. Kudos."

For over 6 months there is still the DD problem of sticking injectors.

Da Book (WWII training manual) sez to use "turbine oil", probably easy to get then.

I simply spray the injector plunger with PB Blaster and check very carefully at the end of any layup.
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