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Old 04-28-2018, 09:21 AM   #21
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Wifey B: How well does your Baby handle these conditions?

David
Wifey B: Haven't had her in those conditions but based on other conditions I would say it would be most unpleasant but she would handle them. One key difference though and that is with a cruising speed of 35 knots, she wouldn't have been caught in those conditions. Similarly, when we do cross, we'll be in a boat that cruises at 20 knots so we'll never be more than 20 hours from shore. Now, crossing the Atlantic would be a different story. Based on build and construction and design, I'd say my "Baby Riva" would handle conditions very similarly to a KK42. However, she won't be tested due to range and, honestly, I would never personally cross an ocean in any sub-50' boat. I'd want about double the length of the 44' Riva to do so. Just because a boat can, doesn't mean I want to do so in it.
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Old 04-28-2018, 11:42 AM   #22
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I would argue that a crossing to Bermuda or anyplace else that is in the 500NM range is entirely dooable in many coastal cruiser type boats of you have the range.

We are pretty good at forecasting out to about 72 hours. Not perfect but pretty good.

Someone mentioned that it’s a 510NM crossing. That is 63 hours at 8 knots... within the range of modern forecasting.

Would I do it in my Bayliner 4788??? No simply because I only have about 600NM of fuel, and that is cutting it a bit tight for me.

I am considering a straight shot from Seward Alaska to Elfin cove Alaska though for my next trip south though. That is a bit over 400NM. Why do that??? Simply to get it out of the way. Pick a good weather window and get it done.

No I’m not advocating that any captain take any boat on a 600NM crossing, but if someone has the range, and a decent boat, and some good sea time under their keel there is no reason not to.
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Old 04-28-2018, 12:03 PM   #23
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We flew to Bermuda last Christmas to spend the holidays with our daughter who lives there. Lots to see and do; beaches, forts, caves, history, nice restaurants and bars, great diving and snorkeling (in summer)... It's a beautiful and friendly (but, yes, expensive) place.
I stopped in a marine shop for a look about, and the owner asked what kind of boat I had. When I told him I have a 25 ft Ranger Tug, his response was:"Oh, we don't see boats like that here. They're either large ocean-going yachts passing through, or small local boats for dayfishing."
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Old 04-28-2018, 12:22 PM   #24
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I would argue that a crossing to Bermuda or anyplace else that is in the 500NM range is entirely dooable in many coastal cruiser type boats of you have the range.

We are pretty good at forecasting out to about 72 hours. Not perfect but pretty good.

Someone mentioned that itís a 510NM crossing. That is 63 hours at 8 knots... within the range of modern forecasting.
I guess I have to agree. Our forecasting is getting remarkably good and you should be able to comfortably see 72 hours out. They seem to be able to forecast the "pop up storms" pretty well within that window.

Any longer- 4 days or more and I wouldn't take a coastal cruiser out that far from land. That far out you need to be able to take 50 kts of wind and 20' seas and rescue yourself.

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Old 04-28-2018, 01:57 PM   #25
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Wifey B: Big diff between the trip to Bermuda vs the Bermuda to Azores run on the other side.
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Old 05-03-2018, 12:27 PM   #26
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Being Bermudian, I would love to extol the wonders of Bermuda. It is a marvellous place, but the realities are, incredibly expensive. The passage to it can be one of the most harrowing you can imagine. The gulf stream can be full of thunderheads, squalls, and very severe seas. I have done the passage numerous times (40-50) in sailboats, competed in the Marion and Newport races numerous times. I have crossed the stream in flat calm motoring and also in 30ft+ seas. I've sailed up to the stream in shorts in 70F+ under balmy skies and within 60 miles been beating to windward in a snowstorm (it was April). The stream at that point is a huge heat engine that makes it's own mini compact weather systems. Sure you can cross in a power vessel, if you do it quickly and pick the weather. But that does not happen often. And then there's always the chance you could be stuck there for weeks awaiting a weather window, to race for Cape Hatteras. My advice..... give it a miss unless you have something in excess of 100ft !!! If you really want to try it PM me and I'll give you a call and talk to you. I used to own most of the boatyards there, and have numerous contacts.
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Old 05-03-2018, 04:35 PM   #27
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Look at the latitude for Bermuda then follow it back to the US. Check the weather between NC and Bermuda..... pretty much the same.

I have been to Bermuda twice. Flew over twice. First time, one prison. When full, a person was given a reporting date. One my most recent visit I was told, they have a bigger prison. LOL

I enjoyed both visits. They were almost 20 years apart. If I go again, I will hire a tour guide, with a car. I am now too old (75) to do a lot of walking especially up hill to the light house.
During the season, St George is a great place to visit.... and the yacht club too. Lots of interesting history, pirates, US civil war involvement too. The island was purposely mis-located on the early charts when it was a pirate hang out.
The bus service is far less expensive than the cabs and the bus will get you pretty much everywhere you want to visit and then some. You can buy a bus pass good for a specified number of days.
Would I recommend a stay in Bermuda, yes.
When I had my N46, back in my feeble mind, it was my intention to take the boat over. First a shake down across FL, across the Gulf down into Mexico. Fate saved me from potential fatal mistakes, the boat fell off the jacks, presto, constructive loss
Obviously the flight time is far less than a boat trip. SMILE
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Old 05-03-2018, 06:24 PM   #28
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Years ago a team from PassageMaker Magazine took a small trawler to Bermuda. I don’t recall the exact boat but someone here must have a copy of that issue.
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Old 05-03-2018, 06:36 PM   #29
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Quote:
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Years ago a team from PassageMaker Magazine took a small trawler to Bermuda. I donít recall the exact boat but someone here must have a copy of that issue.
Yachting published a story on one of the early N37's going over in good weather.

https://www.yachtingmagazine.com/bermuda-high
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Old 05-03-2018, 07:23 PM   #30
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A number of years ago the Nordhaven rally came through. seem to remember it was early summer? They picked their time and weather, and hung around for a week or two till the next calm weather and did the transatlantic. There were quite a few boats 20?.
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Old 05-03-2018, 07:53 PM   #31
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If you are looking for adventure and experience with a blue water crossing and Gulf Stream, then Bermuda gives you a destination, about 700nm from most of the NE and mid atlantic to Charleston. You can take a break there, buy expensive diesel, then head back to East Coast.

If you're primarily looking to explore this tiny country and it's many little islands, I'd save the 8-10 days of boating and fly. I like the harbor boat historic tours.

I've done it both ways over the past 35 years. We just had a Norfolk to Bermuda trip planned on a 44' trawler in mid June -but postponed due to family event.

You can certainly find lower cost options there. Perhaps anchor in Castle Harbor and dinghy to dock at Airport or under the adjacent bridge to get to Hamilton. Stay at B&B's. Eat "local". Ride the bus- it's inexpensive and you can sit up top and enjoy the sun. A day pass will take you to all the towns for a handful of dollars. The town ferries are also reasonable.

I enjoy the town St. Georges. Great to boat and people watch. Even spent an evening in jail there about 8 years ago- and that was quaint and they were very polite.

Emergency healthcare in Hamilton is good if you need it.

Want to Splurge? Head over to Tucker's Point. You can eat at the resort without staying there. You can cruise around the Mid-Ocean Club. BS your way through the gate, and check out the homes, and views, on Tucker's Town Rd.

I went for 2 weeks last year for America Cup and that was special- if you enjoy the world of megayachts.

Any way you do it, Bermuda is pleasant.
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Old 05-03-2018, 07:55 PM   #32
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The boat that PassageMaker took to Bremuda was a Willard 30.
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Old 05-03-2018, 08:44 PM   #33
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Yachting published a story on one of the early N37's going over in good weather.

https://www.yachtingmagazine.com/bermuda-high
As I recall, N37 was in the company of at least one N46 and re-fueled from the N46 via a garden hose while underway. The author recommended the voyage not be duplicated. The intent was to prove the design of the N37 and, they did prove it. They did have a very good weather window and they knew it.
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Old 05-03-2018, 08:47 PM   #34
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If you're primarily looking to explore this tiny country and it's many little islands, I'd save the 8-10 days of boating and fly. .
Wifey B: Fly? That's no fun. 8-10 days? Are you rowing? Even 600 nm at 6 knots is only 4 days.
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Old 05-03-2018, 08:47 PM   #35
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Here's a link to the Passagemker article about the Willard 30 to Bermuda trip:

https://www.passagemaker.com/cruiser...on-a-big-ocean
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Old 05-03-2018, 09:22 PM   #36
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Here's a link to the Passagemker article about the Willard 30 to Bermuda trip:

https://www.passagemaker.com/cruiser...on-a-big-ocean
Great article.
Now, where is the article on the preparations made for the crossing?
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Old 05-04-2018, 02:37 AM   #37
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Bermuda cruising

It was an interesting article. Iím not sure what special preparations were done other than paravanes. They did say they installed racor filters as well. Itís surprising they didnít check the condition of the fuel until after they returned.
Another surprise was the comment about the Willardís midship berth not being comfortable in rough water. My boat is very similar to a Willard 30 and I find the midship berth the best spot in the boat in rough water. Down low in the center is usually best in most boats.
The general sea conditions overall sounded somewhat more benign than I expected after reading all previous comment about the dreaded Gulf Stream.
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Old 05-04-2018, 05:59 AM   #38
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Small motor boats have been crossing the Atlantic , no fuel stop for many decades..

Voyaging Under Power, 4th Edition - Page 7

https://books.google.com/books?isbn=0071767479
Robert P. Beebe, ‎Denis Umstot - 2012 - ‎Preview

Understandably enough, this feature caused a good deal of discontent among the crew of four when Detroit entered the open Atlantic. However, the engine performed flawlessly, and Detroit arrived in The Low was not well laid out for the crossing, either. She was 38 feet long with a 34-foot waterline, 9-foot ... The voyage was made by a Frenchman named Marin-Marie, who was the official marine painter to the French gov- ernment. Marin-Marie had been a small- boat sailor all his life.
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Old 05-08-2018, 12:03 PM   #39
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I remember reading that article in Passage Maker, Bill P the editor and chief at the time. All about the weather window, always wondered why more power boats have not done it, or at least write about doing it. I know in my yard they sold a large Grady White boat that they really loaded up with fuel bags to make it over, never heard how it went though.
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Old 05-08-2018, 03:38 PM   #40
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Have seen several large sport fish leave from Hatteras, NC to make the crossing. They added large plastic chemical tanks on the back decks for the additional fuel requirement. It looked pretty sketchy, but at 20 to 25 knots you really only need one to two really nice days. Don't know if they tournament fish over there.

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