Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-26-2020, 04:57 PM   #21
Guru
 
Seevee's Avatar
 
City: st pete
Vessel Model: 430 Mainship
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 3,362
This choice is NOT black and white, and either could be just fine.


There are goods and bads of both choices, so pick what makes you feel happy.
__________________
Seevee
Seevee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2020, 11:22 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
LongJohn's Avatar
 
City: Watts Bar Lake, Tn River
Vessel Name: RedBoat
Vessel Model: MS 34T
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 144
The single/twin choice for me compared the downsides of requiring a tow to the downsides of increased maintenance. I boat in inland rivers, so waiting on a tow for more than a day (two?) in remote areas is possible but would also not be dangerous. I bought a case of MREs and stuck them under the bed, just in case. My 2005 MS34T is a single with thruster. I've never had to try the MREs.
__________________
LongJohn
LongJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2020, 12:06 PM   #23
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 9,546
My experiences;
N46 separate get home, separate shaft, folding propeller. The shaft nor propeller were protected. Used the main rudder to steer. Engine room cramped by 20KW gen. Was a 12KW boat.
N46, single engine, propeller protected by the skag. Single barn door rudder.
AT.
AT34, single engine, propeller protect by skag (sp). Rudder, a good size. Engine room, easy access to both sides of the main engine.
General observation, single engine can have excellent access to the engine. Single shaft, protected propeller, skag protects from the occasional bottom bump. Single rudder of a good size.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 06:20 AM   #24
Guru
 
catalinajack's Avatar
 
City: Edgewater, MD
Vessel Name: Catalina Jack
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 3,142
Choices, choices, choices. My DeFever 44 with twins saved me twice when a DriveSaver coupling fractured, yes, twice. DeFevers have large engine rooms (5.5 feet of headroom) with good access to the outboard side of the engines. There is even storage space there. A DeFever 44 has large rudders and a keel that extends beyond the propellers which are several inches above the the keel so the props are similarly protected from bottom strikes which happened twice in Canada, granite, the Canadian Shield.

The first save occurred in Ottawa, Canada, a bit too far for a BoatUS rescue. I was able to run 18 miles down the canal to a good boat yard for repairs. If that had occurred in the Georgian Bay or the North Channel or half-way to the Virgin Islands, good luck with that. Or, how about while entering a very difficult inlet, the kind that many guys insist that dual Racors are necessary, just in case the filter plugs up at just the wrong time?

I am quite happy with twins even though I have one extra oil change and impeller change each year, about $100, you know that wildly expensive doubling of maintenance expense. Still, I would not hesitate to consider a single-engined boat in the future. I would just factor in the risk associated with having just one engine. Where one boats is probably the biggest factor among many.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
My experiences;
N46 separate get home, separate shaft, folding propeller. The shaft nor propeller were protected. Used the main rudder to steer. Engine room cramped by 20KW gen. Was a 12KW boat.
N46, single engine, propeller protected by the skag. Single barn door rudder.
AT.
AT34, single engine, propeller protect by skag (sp). Rudder, a good size. Engine room, easy access to both sides of the main engine.
General observation, single engine can have excellent access to the engine. Single shaft, protected propeller, skag protects from the occasional bottom bump. Single rudder of a good size.
catalinajack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 07:31 AM   #25
Guru
 
High Wire's Avatar
 
City: Cape May, NJ
Vessel Name: Irish Lady
Vessel Model: Monk 36
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 4,451
Quote:
Originally Posted by SILENTKNIGHT View Post
we only travel within the great south bay of long island , might do a block island trip, but other than that we drive 7 miles across the bay and park it at the dock for 3 days of fun .
Based on this alone, I would vote for the ease of maintenance of a single. You are in SeaTow/BoatUS areas for the worst failure.
__________________
Archie
Irish Lady
1984 Monk 36 Hull #46
Currently in Cape May, NJ
High Wire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 09:30 AM   #26
Guru
 
Pete Meisinger's Avatar
 
City: Oconto, WI
Vessel Name: Best Alternative
Vessel Model: 36 Albin Aft Cabin
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,150
The Single

pete
Pete Meisinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2020, 10:01 AM   #27
Guru
 
JohnEasley's Avatar


 
City: Palmetto
Vessel Name: Wanderlust
Vessel Model: 1999 Jefferson Rivanna 52'
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 713
As the others have said, twins are easier to dock because you can split the sticks. The drawback to twins is the engine room will be tight, tight, tight.

With a single, maintenance is much easier. With some practice... determining the direction of prop walk, learning the effect of the wheel turned hard to one side and the result of forward and reverse, and the use of a bow thruster, you can learn to walk the boat sideways, if needed. It even becomes fun to do.

You’ll need to establish your own list of priorities to decide with route to take.
__________________
John Easley
USCG 100 ton Master
1999 Jefferson Rivanna 52’
JohnEasley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2020, 01:53 PM   #28
Member
 
City: Norfolk
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 20
34' Pilot

I love my single Yanmar with Bow Thruster. And with the Generator slightly to STBD centerline aft we have lots of room to climb around but best if your tech is short then 6'.
FOADIAC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2020, 03:13 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
RossWilson's Avatar
 
City: Oakville
Vessel Name: Good Vibrations
Vessel Model: Mainship 34T
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 237
I own a 2006 MS34T with twin Yanmar 240's. She's also equipped with both bow and stern thrusters. And I love the control that twins offer. Yes, maintenance is a little more expensive. But the advantage of control whilst docking and maneuvering in small spaces is worth the extra expense.


Also, last summer, when I was about to leave a lock, my port engine wouldn't start. If she'd had only one engine, leaving the lock would obviously have been somewhat more challenging. Perhaps I could have moved sideways using the twin thrusters. :-) (The issue was just a loose wire, but I couldn't resolve the issue while my boat sat in the lock.)



As far as servicing space is concerned, yes, it's a tighter fit, especially since I have twin Rolls Surrette batteries mounted between the 2 engines. But the mechanics have never complained. And when I do the minor maintenance stuff, I certainly wouldn't complain either.
__________________
Ross Wilson
Freelance Writer/Author
RossWilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2020, 03:26 PM   #30
Veteran Member
 
City: Punta gorda
Vessel Name: Rhode waves
Vessel Model: Mainship pilot 34
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 44
twin 240

I have twin 240 in my pilot 34, once you figure out how to get to the outside of both engines you really have plenty of room to work. I live having twins and would buy the boat again the same way
Rhodewaves is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2020, 03:36 PM   #31
Guru
 
oscar's Avatar
 
City: Bethlehem, PA
Vessel Name: Lady Kay V
Vessel Model: 1978 Hatteras 53MY
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,098
Quote:
Originally Posted by MV Wanderlust View Post
The drawback to twins is the engine room will be tight, tight, tight.
That's why you need TWO stand up engine rooms.......

Love my twins.
__________________
https://ladykay.blog/
oscar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2020, 06:09 PM   #32
Guru
 
backinblue's Avatar
 
City: Stratford, CT
Vessel Name: Blue Moon
Vessel Model: Mainship Pilot 355
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 2,864
Besides the space issue, 1 engine is half the maintenance $$$ of 2. Also, less weight and less of everything needed to support the engine. That's a very reliable engine, I have the same, and I never worry about it. Given that you are easily reachable for a tow if needed, there is no worry about getting home. Also a good point about prop protection on a single. Saved me once or twice. Most single engine boats of the type you are looking at have at least a bow thruster and maybe a stern. Those should minimize docking worries.
backinblue is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2020, 10:21 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
LongJohn's Avatar
 
City: Watts Bar Lake, Tn River
Vessel Name: RedBoat
Vessel Model: MS 34T
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 144
assuming the the 2005 and the 2006 34T hull is the same, the prop for the single engine boat is in a half tunnel. Prop walk is not an issue.
__________________
LongJohn
LongJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2020, 07:14 AM   #34
TF Site Team
 
Bacchus's Avatar
 
City: Seneca Lake NY
Vessel Name: Bacchus
Vessel Model: MS 34 HT Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 6,474
Quote:
Originally Posted by LongJohn View Post
assuming the the 2005 and the 2006 34T hull is the same, the prop for the single engine boat is in a half tunnel. Prop walk is not an issue.
Not an issue but at times when it would help (with good planning) its not there to assist. The tiny rudders are not a big help at slow speed. Thrusters are nice to have w the single and why MS made bow std equip.
__________________
Don
2008 MS 34 HT Trawler
"Bacchus"
Bacchus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2020, 04:33 PM   #35
Senior Member
 
City: Long Beach Ca
Vessel Name: Freebird
Vessel Model: 1997 Mainship 350
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 382
I've always had twins. My 97/350 has twin Volvo TAMD41P-A's although tight I can still do maintenance on the boat. Its your choice what ever you pick you will adapt.
jclays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2020, 07:10 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
Medic's Avatar
 
City: Hilton Head, SC
Vessel Name: Mimi's Oasis
Vessel Model: North Pacific 49
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 116
On my Meridian 469 you absolutely must have at least 2 people to change the oil filter on the generator. I am kidding you not! One person (the idiot, likely me) will be fully inverted down the hatch, at least to the waist and most likely to mid-thigh. The second person will be holding the first person by the ankles or knees. If the idiot doesn't communicate for more than a few seconds he is likely unconscious and the second person most likely needs to scream for more help because pulling the idiot out straight up would be almost impossible for most people without said help.

And that is all because of having two engines taking up all the space in the ER. A single engine would leave plenty of space for the generator.

And I haven't talked about changing the oil filters on the starboard engine. The engine will have to be completely cold because you will be squishing your left shoulder, your neck, and your head into a pathetically inadequate space and then, if you have not lost all of the feeling in your left hand you will have to remove the filter with just the very ends of your fingers, hope you don't spill all the oil if you drop the filter, which is very likely, and THEN you have to try to screw a new filter, full of oil, and only being held by those very finger ends onto the threads while dancing the filter from one finger tip to the next, and not dropping the whole d**n thing.

So, I rather prefer the single engine on my North Pacific 49 all things considered, but other than that I guess I have no opinion.
Medic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2020, 07:29 PM   #37
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,379
Greetings,
Mr. M. That has GOT to be the best description of an oil filter change I have ever read. Experience counts. Thank you.
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2020, 07:11 AM   #38
Guru
 
Dougcole's Avatar
 
City: Carrabelle, FL
Vessel Name: Morgan
Vessel Model: '05 Mainship 40T
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,992
[QUOTE=Medic;952379]On my Meridian 469 you absolutely must have at least 2 people to change the oil filter on the generator. I am kidding you not! One person (the idiot, likely me) will be fully inverted down the hatch, at least to the waist and most likely to mid-thigh. The second person will be holding the first person by the ankles or knees. If the idiot doesn't communicate for more than a few seconds he is likely unconscious and the second person most likely needs to scream for more help because pulling the idiot out straight up would be almost impossible for most people without said help.

And that is all because of having two engines taking up all the space in the ER. A single engine would leave plenty of space for the generator.

And I haven't talked about changing the oil filters on the starboard engine. The engine will have to be completely cold because you will be squishing your left shoulder, your neck, and your head into a pathetically inadequate space and then, if you have not lost all of the feeling in your left hand you will have to remove the filter with just the very ends of your fingers, hope you don't spill all the oil if you drop the filter, which is very likely, and THEN you have to try to screw a new filter, full of oil, and only being held by those very finger ends onto the threads while dancing the filter from one finger tip to the next, and not dropping the whole d**n thing.

So, I rather prefer the single engine on my North Pacific 49 all things considered, but other than that I guess I have no opinion.[/


Sounds like you should consider a remote mount for that oil filter.
Dougcole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2020, 07:17 AM   #39
Guru
 
backinblue's Avatar
 
City: Stratford, CT
Vessel Name: Blue Moon
Vessel Model: Mainship Pilot 355
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 2,864
Or consider paying a mechanic to do it for you. I don't know why so many boaters insist on doing every single thing themselves rather than supporting the marina that they claim to love. There's nothing wrong with sharing a little $$$ with others to do the jobs that are not fun.
backinblue is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2020, 07:54 AM   #40
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 9,546
OR install an oil change system and while you are 'installing', get a fuel polishing system too. Reverso makes both and they are pretty good, a nice clean system install.
I have both.
You can install fuel valving to do whatever you want.
My fuel polisher is set up to draw from both tanks and return to both tanks. You can preprogram the system too.
I go into the ER, push a button and it cleans the fuel for 2 hours.
Of course my fuel drawn from the bottom of the tank. The engine supply lines are butt welded to the bottom of the tank.
LOL when I think back, my N46 had a valve manifold, a bit confusing.... it had 4 fuel tanks suppling the Lugger and 2 generators plus, I could move fuel via a separate pump and Racor filter. Yup, was a home-made fuel polisher.
The only way I could learn that valve manifold was to sit-down there and draw it out, labeling each of the valves on the diagram, their normal position etc. I dont miss that manifold.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012