Trawler Forum

Trawler Forum (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/)
-   Liveaboards (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s30/)
-   -   Trash handling aboard (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s30/trash-handling-aboard-61927.html)

JWellington 01-19-2022 11:23 AM

Trash handling aboard
 
Lately I've been reading up a bit on regs and trends in trash handling. Heard many mentions about cutting the bottoms out of wine bottles, for example , before tossing them overboard. But none mentioned any benefit for the hassle. Bottles sink anyway. In my day everybody just threw everything overboard, including black water tanks, as long as one was 3 or 12 miles out. Whats with this bottle thing?

Portage_Bay 01-19-2022 12:23 PM

Yes, I've heard of the practice and know boaters who do it. I won't becasue it litters the bottom with trash. When dragging the bottom for biological research samples it is alarming how much trash comes up. I had room for the full bottles when I left on the cruise, I still have room for the empties till I get back.

BandB 01-19-2022 12:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JWellington (Post 1069834)
Lately I've been reading up a bit on regs and trends in trash handling. Heard many mentions about cutting the bottoms out of wine bottles, for example , before tossing them overboard. But none mentioned any benefit for the hassle. Bottles sink anyway. In my day everybody just threw everything overboard, including black water tanks, as long as one was 3 or 12 miles out. Whats with this bottle thing?

Don't know where you're reading, but I'd suggest changing libraries. Just because one can, doesn't mean one should. As to wine bottles, we don't empty any at sea as none consumed when underway. However, we don't throw anything overboard that isn't biodegradable and we macerate and treat even that. We do have a compactor for can's, paper, etc. We generally don't use glass on board. I realize that if one is in 2000' of water, it probably doesn't matter, but I just see no reason to do so.

JWellington 01-19-2022 12:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Portage_Bay (Post 1069849)
Yes, I've heard of the practice and know boaters who do it. I won't becasue it litters the bottom with trash. When dragging the bottom for biological research samples it is alarming how much trash comes up. I had room for the full bottles when I left on the cruise, I still have room for the empties till I get back.

All the glass is on the bottom either way. Room for the empies? Geeez. Imagine...4pax on boat, 3 or 4 weeks at sea....say 2 bottles per day. Sure you had them at start, but most dont want to have them around. Anyway trash in the sea or landfills...most not recycled. Im in dominican right now and all glass is just thrown in garbage.

Alaskan Sea-Duction 01-19-2022 01:18 PM

We have learned the following that works for us and reduce the amount of trash to shore.

1. While at the dock, go through all you ship stores. If the item is in a box, take it out and mark it. Cut or mark the cooking instructions. This save a lot of space and trash.

2. You may like bottled beer, but switch to cans. crush the cans. A small kitchen waste basket holds a lot of crushed cans. You can also crush veggie cans after you rinse them.

3. Boxed wine instead of bottle. I know this is almost forbidden, at least to my wife.

4. Take a large coffee can and use it for biologicals. Food scraps, peels etc. Once outside your anchorage, dump the scraps overboard.

5. Rinse things out before placing them in the trash. This will cut down any smells.

Reduce the on-board trash items as much as you can. Once you get to a marina that accepts trash, you will have less to deposit.

Remember, burning your trash on shore in B.C. is illegal and you could be cited if LEO catches you doing so.

I am sure there are other items that can be left at shore to reduce your trash.

Bacchus 01-19-2022 01:18 PM

We use a lot of box wines aboard... cardbordeaux... really some like black box aren't too bad. If cruising extended times it easy to remove outer box ashore and put bladders in a drawer or box for storage. One original outer box let's you handle & pour easily. Beer cans compress & store easily for recycling alum.
Unpacking groceries ashore eliminates a lot of bulk.

psneeld 01-19-2022 01:20 PM

Don't know about Canada but US and many countries follow MARPOL regulations by treaty.

Many places you can dump darn near anything overboard...in the Arctic it winds up sitting on the ice much of the year.

Sealife 01-19-2022 01:47 PM

I think the bottle thing is about a small creature going in though neck and growing, then not being able to get out...

Osprey69 01-19-2022 02:03 PM

When racing to Bermuda aboard our 40' sailboat, we de-carboard all packaging, throw any food items over the side and purchase quick composting biodegradable paper products which also goes over the side. All plastic items are cut up and put in a garbage bag.

After a 4 day trip with 4 people on board, we barely fill half a tall kitchen trash bag.

JWellington 01-19-2022 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psneeld (Post 1069871)
Don't know about Canada but US and many countries follow MARPOL regulations by treaty.

Many places you can dump darn near anything overboard...in the Arctic it winds up sitting on the ice much of the year.

I think I just read MARPOL says anything 12_miles out is ok.

JWellington 01-19-2022 02:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Osprey69 (Post 1069895)
When racing to Bermuda aboard our 40' sailboat, we de-carboard all packaging, throw any food items over the side and purchase quick composting biodegradable paper products which also goes over the side. All plastic items are cut up and put in a garbage bag.

After a 4 day trip with 4 people on board, we barely fill half a tall kitchen trash bag.

Try 4 WEEKS, 4 or 5 people.

JWellington 01-19-2022 02:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sealife (Post 1069888)
I think the bottle thing is about a small creature going in though neck and growing, then not being able to get out...

Ahhhhh, possibly. Never heard or read that mentioned.

Moonfish 01-19-2022 02:54 PM

We try and avoid dumping ANYTHING into the water! The old adage "take only pictures, leave only footprints" could be paraphrased to "take only what you can keep until you can leave it ashore."

psneeld 01-19-2022 03:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JWellington (Post 1069899)
I think I just read MARPOL says anything 12_miles out is ok.

Oil isn't, maybe a few other things.

12 miles is recognized territorial waters.

Mako 01-19-2022 03:16 PM

I was never one for luxuries on my boat, but I really found the trash compactor to be extremely helpful when out at sea for a week or more.

Wish I could fit an incinerator onboard like the big ships do.

rslifkin 01-19-2022 03:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psneeld (Post 1069921)
Oil isn't, maybe a few other things.

12 miles is recognized territorial waters.


I think the other big exception is no plastic at any time.

Alaskan Sea-Duction 01-19-2022 03:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rslifkin (Post 1069926)
I think the other big exception is no plastic at any time.

Reminds me of the central Pacific with miles and miles of trash floating on top. Sad

BandB 01-19-2022 04:43 PM

I return to the OP and others talking about throwing trash in the ocean and ask, "What is the problem you're having and trying to address?" Are you cruising months without going near shore? Is it cans, cardboard, glass? The example used of wine bottles just seems so obvious to me, that you rinse it and put it right back where you got it. If you don't go anywhere for more wine, then the space is available. If you go for more, then that's where you dispose of the bottle.

I just don't grasp the burden that is forcing people to dump in the ocean. Perhaps those who spend months at sea and far from any land, but I don't know many of those active here and the ones I do know are not the ones indicating a problem.

I choose not to litter but it's not just because of laws against littering. I've never been in a situation in which it was necessary. Even if it's cans, crush them and you have less than you brought with you. Even cardboard, less than at the start. Only thing we put in the water is food. So will someone please explain the need and desire to me.

Thanks.

Alaskan Sea-Duction 01-19-2022 04:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 1069960)
I return to the OP and others talking about throwing trash in the ocean and ask, "What is the problem you're having and trying to address?" Are you cruising months without going near shore? Is it cans, cardboard, glass? The example used of wine bottles just seems so obvious to me, that you rinse it and put it right back where you got it. If you don't go anywhere for more wine, then the space is available. If you go for more, then that's where you dispose of the bottle.



I just don't grasp the burden that is forcing people to dump in the ocean. Perhaps those who spend months at sea and far from any land, but I don't know many of those active here and the ones I do know are not the ones indicating a problem.



I choose not to litter but it's not just because of laws against littering. I've never been in a situation in which it was necessary. Even if it's cans, crush them and you have less than you brought with you. Even cardboard, less than at the start. Only thing we put in the water is food. So will someone please explain the need and desire to me.



Thanks.

Good point.

O C Diver 01-19-2022 04:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 1069960)
So will someone please explain the need and desire to me.

Thanks.

Laziness.

Ted


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:34 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012