Lifting a Lehman 120

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Joined
Sep 20, 2023
Messages
16
Location
Los Angeles, CA
Vessel Name
Bear Flag
Vessel Make
'81 Her Shine 40
A per my previous posts, I'm attempting to remove a stuck #6 piston and need to lift the engine to slide the oil pan forward to get at the connecting rod nuts. I'm thinking I'll support the cabin sole underneath with some 2x4's and use a 6x6 wood beam (or steel) across the engine room hatch. Disconnect the shaft flange coupling from the transmission, free the engine from the aft motor mounts and lift only the rear part of the engine with the transmission attached so it pivots upward on the forward motor mounts. The engine is mounted higher in front than aft, of course. All I need is about 4 inches which I don't think will put too much strain on the forward motor mounts. The head and other components have been removed for other reasons so it's been lightened up considerably. Just wanted to run the plan by the forum here for any suggestions, advice, or words of warning.
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When they lifted my engine out they used the lifting eyes on top of the engine. As long as you use those you should be fine. They will take quite a bit of weight off the engine supports, so the stress on hull should be minimal. It you do this with care it should work out. Understand you will leave the boat in the water so be aware you will shift part of the weight a few meters higher when you start lifting, so keep that in mind.
 
I lifted my SP225s up and out of the engine room on our last boat. I always pretty much overdo everything so I made sure that everything I did was more than rated for the job. Mi ran 2x8s horizontally under the deck supported down to the stringers with 2x4s. I used 6x6s on one side to make an upside down T to support an I beam across the ER. On the other side I welded up a similar T out of 2x2 square stock because I didn’t have room for the 6x6s due to a cabinet. Then I used a 6” I beam with a trolley and chain fall to lift. I had a braacket made to span the lifting eyes on the top of the engine. It worked very well and we got the engines out in less than 2 hours each. I did one at a time and atacked the engine above the other engine while it was out.

1st photo is the port side 6x6 post
2nd photo is the starboard side 2x2 tube post
3rd photo is the structure below the deck down to the stringers
4th photo is the engine bracket
5th photo is the engine sitting on the deck on temporary stringers
 

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I lifted my SP225s up and out of the engine room on our last boat. I always pretty much overdo everything so I made sure that everything I did was more than rated for the job. Mi ran 2x8s horizontally under the deck supported down to the stringers with 2x4s. I used 6x6s on one side to make an upside down T to support an I beam across the ER. On the other side I welded up a similar T out of 2x2 square stock because I didn’t have room for the 6x6s due to a cabinet. Then I used a 6” I beam with a trolley and chain fall to lift. I had a braacket made to span the lifting eyes on the top of the engine. It worked very well and we got the engines out in less than 2 hours each. I did one at a time and atacked the engine above the other engine while it was out.

1st photo is the port side 6x6 post
2nd photo is the starboard side 2x2 tube post
3rd photo is the structure below the deck down to the stringers
4th photo is the engine bracket
5th photo is the engine sitting on the deck on temporary stringers
Well done. The temp stringers are a great idea. I have a chain fall rated at 2000 lbs but the chain looks thin to me. What size was your chain fall?
 
When they lifted my engine out they used the lifting eyes on top of the engine. As long as you use those you should be fine. They will take quite a bit of weight off the engine supports, so the stress on hull should be minimal. It you do this with care it should work out. Understand you will leave the boat in the water so be aware you will shift part of the weight a few meters higher when you start lifting, so keep that in mind.
Mine has lifting eyes at the rear of the engine which I think will be perfect for lifting it and the transmission together. BTW, I delivered an '82 DeFever '49' from Seattle to Los Angeles last year. I spent 11 days onboard which convinced me that owning a trawler was the way to go. We found our Hershine 40' in March and are now liveaboards.
 
I had a Lehman 6th cylinder diagnosis, after all, that is what is often found. I tore into it myself. I chose to remove the trans from the engine to lighten the load. It was then that I found that the damper was the cause of the seizure. As you are into the job you may want to look at the damper. It may be a part to replace as a preventative measure if not the main cause.
 
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Agree with the dampner inspection...mine failed very slowly with hard to define symptoms.

Wound up failing 20 miles short of home after 1000 miles of symptoms no one could verify.

As inexpensive as they are and a mother to replace (when you don't wish to)... if more than 1500-2000 hrs old or more than a decade.... I would replace as rust causing a failed spring can be their killer like in my case.
 
Interesting. I found records onboard showing both dampers were replace 10 years ago. Not sure how many hours they’ve run since but definitely not 1500-2000. How would the transmission dampers affect the number six cylinder?
 
Agree with the dampner inspection...mine failed very slowly with hard to define symptoms.

Wound up failing 20 miles short of home after 1000 miles of symptoms no one could verify.

As inexpensive as they are and a mother to replace (when you don't wish to)... if more than 1500-2000 hrs old or more than a decade.... I would replace as rust causing a failed spring can be their killer like in my case.
I just read some previous threads about dampers and the failed spring might very well be my problem. I’ll take your advice and remove the tranny and check the damper.
 
Interesting. I found records onboard showing both dampers were replace 10 years ago. Not sure how many hours they’ve run since but definitely not 1500-2000. How would the transmission dampers affect the number six cylinder?
It should not effect the #6 only but a broken spring can stop the engine from turning. I would definitely replace the damper when the engine is out. Cheap and easy to do. I did mine when the engines were out.
 
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