Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-06-2023, 10:54 AM   #1
Veteran Member
 
City: Boca
Join Date: Oct 2022
Posts: 45
Tool set for small diesels

Iím getting ready to take the plunge and purchase either a sailboat or trawler. I have no previous experience with marine diesel engines. I want to be able to properly maintain and troubleshoot any problems that may come up as I wish to go to those remote beautiful spots with out the fear of being stranded. Can anyone suggest a list of tools or a tool kit set that provides what would be required to take care of most situations?
Thanks for your help !
Woody5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 11:03 AM   #2
Moderator Emeritus
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Black Dog
Vessel Model: Formula 41PC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 18,559
I have a recommended list for Lehman engines. Donít know if it will work with the engine you might buy.
Attached Thumbnails
9A701767-ACE4-4EAC-860B-72D4147B9680.jpeg  
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you arenít one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 11:05 AM   #3
Guru
 
Pete Meisinger's Avatar
 
City: Oconto, WI
Vessel Name: Best Alternative
Vessel Model: 36 Albin Aft Cabin
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,736
My toolbox weighs over a hundred pounds. I also have a small pouch containing about 10 commonly used tools which I often take into the bilge.

You need something in between. Your toolkit should be dictated by your own abilities.

What do you have at home?, and what home jobs will you tackle at home? If your home toolbox is a mismatched conglomeration of rusty junk you won't be able to tackle many boat problems.

Your first decision should be "metric or standard"? Then decide if you will be a mechanic or a carpenter.

For a first step, hire someone to change the fuel filters on your engine and then go buy the very tools he used.

pete
Pete Meisinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 11:20 AM   #4
Guru
 
GoneFarrell's Avatar
 
City: Columbia City, OR & Mulege, BCS
Vessel Name: Imagine
Vessel Model: Farrell 34
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 779
Until you have a particular diesel I can only give general advice.

Most of the stuff you will work/maintain is the stuff around the engine: water pumps, coolers, hoses, belts, alternators, batteries, wiring, connectors, fuel filters.

Deeper is valve adjustment, starter swap.

Next is hard motor stuff: injection system, head gasket, exhaust manifolds.

Spares kit of gaskets, clamps, pump rebuild, belts, alternator.

The biggest tools I got on board allow head gasket change. 180 ft-lb torque.
GoneFarrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 03:22 PM   #5
STB
Guru
 
City: Clearwater
Vessel Name: Seas the Bay
Vessel Model: 1981 Hardin 42 Europa/Sedan
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 1,837
Don't forget commonly used tools more common now that when that list was fresh...

IR thermometer for keeping an eye on temps and verifying gauges

Phototach for verifying rpms when in engine room and verifying gauges

Battery and coolant refractometers (or one with a wide range) to check batteries and coolant.

Also...

Ratcheting crimper and small torch for heat shrink connectors

Wire cutter

Large crimper for battery cables

Also, things I have and use once...but many friends have borrowed...

Exhaust gas test kit
Coolant system pressure test kit
STB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 03:52 PM   #6
Guru
 
diver dave's Avatar
 
City: Palm Coast, FL
Vessel Name: Coquina
Vessel Model: Lagoon 380
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 2,495
Start with the likely JOB to do, and then that drives the tools.
for instance; our last time out, had to do a starter swap. Those can have some rqmts for longer extensions on your socket set. You will get lists here that will overwhelm small boats! I have twin engines, that means there is twice the likelyhood for failures!
Dont' forget the dink motor. I've been into that carb twice while out.
diver dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 05:14 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
City: Grand Rapids, MI
Vessel Name: Escape
Vessel Model: 1973 Concorde 41 DC
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 499
And of course are the fasteners on the engine Imperial or metric? If they're metric you'll likely need Imperial anyway for other stuff on the boat.
Six -point sockets do a much better job on tough bolts than the more common twelve-point. The 12's only bear on the corners and can knock them off, 6's won't do that.
jgwinks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 05:31 PM   #8
Guru
 
rgano's Avatar
 
City: Southport, FL near Panama City
Vessel Name: FROLIC
Vessel Model: Mainship 30 Pilot II since 2015. GB-42 1986-2015. Former Unlimited Tonnage Master
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,622
I had a trawler into which I stuffed LOTS of tools to handle just about anything which might happen while far from home. Now I have a much smaller boat (but bigger diesel engine) which could but will unlikely venture very far from home with a much smaller tool set. It just depends on your abilities and how far from home you want to go. Just because you may not have the ability to perform some job on the engine does not mean you cannot carry suggested spare parts and the tools for somebody else to use.
__________________
Rich Gano
FROLIC (2005 MainShip 30 Pilot II)
Panama City area
rgano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 06:31 PM   #9
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,024
Greetings,
Mr. W. You can drive yourself bonkers with tools and spares. As mentioned, a LOT depends on your skills AND the space to store all that stuff.


On a smaller trawler and particularly on a stick boat, space will be at a premium. You will not only have to store mechanical "stuff" (tools/spares) but electrical, plumbing and wood/fiberglass "stuff" (tools/spares), as well. PLUS...All the other small bits and pieces and do-dads that need a place to live.


At some point you're gonna want/need a bigger boat...Now where to put the milling machine? Beside the drill press or between the band saw and the lathe?


__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 07:22 PM   #10
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Walkabout Creek
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 8,818
You said for a small diesel, so we are talking about mechanic stuff. I'd start with the basics. Socket set with extensions, ratchet, and breaker bar. Unless it's a really small engine, like a small sail boat engine, I would get both 3/8" and 1/2" sets. I think all engines now are metric, and have been for quite a while, even the US brands. I don't know exactly when they switched over, but Cat, Cummins, Deere are all metric now. And certainly Yanmar, Volvo, MTU, MAN, Scania, etc.


The screw drivers, side cutters, pliers, big channel lock pliers, a hammer,.


Then a set of combination wrenches.


And a good Volt-Ohm meter, and a laser thermometer. A clamp on DC meter is very handy too, but be certain it does both AC and DC.


That will get you pretty far, and from there I'd just buy what I need, as I need it. I've been wrenching on stuff for over 50 years now, still have some of the first tools I bought as a kid, and am still buying stuff as I need it. Torx heads (both male and female) are increasingly popular, for example, as are hex socket heads. If you encounter them, it's time to get a set.


You can also improvise a LOT with basic tools. For example, I don't use oil filter wrenches, and instead just use channel lock pliers.
__________________
MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 07:55 PM   #11
Guru
 
City: Owings, Md
Vessel Name: Graceland
Vessel Model: Mainship 34 MK1
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 1,171
Line wrenches for injector lines
Gdavid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 08:18 PM   #12
Guru
 
C lectric's Avatar
 
City: Gibsons, B.C., Canada
Vessel Name: Island Pride
Vessel Model: Palmer 32'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,185
I will add a 1/4" drive set of sockets. Whichever way you purchase , inch or metric, then get the others , inch or metric as I will bet unless the boat is quite new you will have some of both.
Even then there may well be domestically produced equipment that needs the other system.
The 1/4 drives will also cover the need for nut drivers and small nut/bolts.

But save the purchases untill you have the boat and looked around at what you have.

Often times medium age boats will have a mix of inchric and meteric.
C lectric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 09:02 PM   #13
Guru
 
mvweebles's Avatar
 
City: Saint Petersburg
Vessel Name: Weebles
Vessel Model: 1970 Willard 36 Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 5,560
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
...... I think all engines now are metric, and have been for quite a while, even the US brands. I don't know exactly when they switched over, but Cat, Cummins, Deere are all metric now. And certainly Yanmar, Volvo, MTU, MAN, Scania, etc.
I was stunned when I bought a pop-top camper van based on a 2000 E150 platform that the engine was metric. I thought we squashed the metrics system back in the Reagan administration.

The tool list from Bob Smith posted by Comodave is an excellent start. I would add a 5/16" nut driver with flexible shaft for hose clamps (I think 5/16" is the common size).

Seems all boats have a couple oddball fasteners. So keep an open mind. On the bracket that held my old hydraulic pump for stabilizers, I needed a very thin 10mm wrench so I ground down one and zip-tied it nearby. My old stuffing box had large gland nuts so the appropriate wrenches hung nearby.

Point being is you have to spend some quality time to find orphan fasteners that will require special tools.

As a follow-on, I wonder what the collective wisdom is on 6-point vs 12-point sockets.

Peter
__________________
M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Trawler
mvweebles is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 10:06 PM   #14
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Walkabout Creek
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 8,818
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvweebles View Post
I was stunned when I bought a pop-top camper van based on a 2000 E150 platform that the engine was metric. I thought we squashed the metrics system back in the Reagan administration.

That's right, the US pussied out on the world-wide switch over in the 70's because the car companies all claimed it would ruin them. Now they are all fully metric, but are the very people who caused the rest of the country to remain stuck in the stone age. Thanks guys! Job well done.
__________________
MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2023, 10:25 PM   #15
Guru
 
mvweebles's Avatar
 
City: Saint Petersburg
Vessel Name: Weebles
Vessel Model: 1970 Willard 36 Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 5,560
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
That's right, the US pussied out on the world-wide switch over in the 70's because the car companies all claimed it would ruin them. Now they are all fully metric, but are the very people who caused the rest of the country to remain stuck in the stone age. Thanks guys! Job well done.
At least we didn't go Whitworth. I have a 1963 Triumph motorcycle and a set of wrenches that are useless except for that bike.
__________________
M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Trawler
mvweebles is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2023, 03:00 PM   #16
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 4,837
Quote:
As a follow-on, I wonder what the collective wisdom is on 6-point vs 12-point sockets.
6 point are generally the best because as noted above, they rarely strip the corners off the hex.
My mechanic son won't use a 12 point unless he has to, which is rare.
__________________
Jay Leonard
Ex boats: 1983 40 Albin trunk cabin, 1978 Mainship 34 Model 1
New Port Richey, Fl
jleonard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2023, 03:01 PM   #17
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Walkabout Creek
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 8,818
Quote:
Originally Posted by jleonard View Post
6 point are generally the best because as noted above, they rarely strip the corners off the hex.
My mechanic son won't use a 12 point unless he has to, which is rare.

Totally agree. 12-point are pretty useless.
__________________
MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2023, 06:39 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Cold Duck's Avatar
 
City: Discovery Bay
Vessel Name: Cold Duck
Vessel Model: MS 350 Trawler, 1997
Join Date: Jul 2022
Posts: 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete Meisinger View Post
My toolbox weighs over a hundred pounds. I also have a small pouch containing about 10 commonly used tools which I often take into the bilge.

You need something in between. Your toolkit should be dictated by your own abilities.

What do you have at home?, and what home jobs will you tackle at home? If your home toolbox is a mismatched conglomeration of rusty junk you won't be able to tackle many boat problems.

Your first decision should be "metric or standard"? Then decide if you will be a mechanic or a carpenter.

For a first step, hire someone to change the fuel filters on your engine and then go buy the very tools he used.

pete
Like Pete, just one of numerous of my boxes is 100lbs+. I have come to buy a bunch of these cheap plastic toolboxes with the usual metric/English up to about 3/4" and stash them everywhere, boats, dinghies, trailers, RVs, cars, everywhere. Generally, they will take care of most common jobs. The MTUs in my 70fter started out at 19mm and then went up. Try finding 25mm, 32mm and up for sockets 25.4mm= 1'. We had to calculate English to mm to use some instead. So, the special tools you will need will depend on
1. what engine and equipment you have,
2. where you are going to travel
3. Your ability/desire to get down and dirty with your engine

I removed a 600 crank out of one of those MTUs while engine was in the boat. That required purchasing some special tools and improvising. Oh, MTU states all four bolts on all 5 main bearing journals must be tightened simultaneously! Maybe in the factory in Deutschland but not in a berth in Florida
Cold Duck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2023, 08:33 AM   #19
Guru
 
catalinajack's Avatar
 
City: Edgewater, MD
Vessel Name: Catalina Jack
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Comodave View Post
I have a recommended list for Lehman engines. Donít know if it will work with the engine you might buy.
Good starting point. I have FL 120s and keep far more tools than what appear on this list. Breaker bar, torque wrench, tap and dies, two drills, Sawzall, many screwdrivers, many types and sizes of pliers, hammers, die grinder, impact wrench, large diameter impact sockets, and the list goes on. There is almost no job I cannot do on board and, at one time or another, I have had need of them all including the Sawzall and the tap and dies.
catalinajack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2023, 12:09 PM   #20
Guru
 
tiltrider1's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Vessel Name: AZZURRA
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 54
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 3,622
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
Totally agree. 12-point are pretty useless.
Not completely worthless. In some tight recesses you canít get enough angle to get a 6 point wrench on. In this case the 12 point will save you.

On rare occasions there are 12 point bolts. Here a 12 point socket will save the day.

Point of note. My boat sockets are all 6 point but my wrenches are all 12 point.
tiltrider1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012