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Old 01-27-2020, 12:11 PM   #81
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MakoBuilders: Yes the head is something around 250 pounds. The flywheel is also quite heavy and I had to use my gantry crane to lift it, as is the rear housing. Installing the cylinder head with a gantry crane was easy. At some point I'm going to build myself a portable gantry crane for use in the boat that I can bolt together/break down and keep on board in case I want to do anything that requires heavy lifting. Uniflite was generous with the engine access hatches as well as building in a huge hatch in the Flybridge so nothing had to be cut to get the engine out.

PacificBlue: No I'm not marking them with paint, just using a methodical approach as well as triple checking before sealing up access to any area. When torquing to 185 ft. lbs each bolt is an experience in and of itself.

TwistedTree: I've followed your blog for a long time and have been wondering how the new Nord is coming along.

I'm not sure about the rebuild interval in a boat. On the road, they were known to do 500,000 miles in a truck/bus if well cared for. J&T tended to really extract a lot of power from them which increases wear and reduces life expectancy. With the N80 injectors my particular engine is equipped with, it's rated at 290 HP. The 92 series V motors were known for wearing out main bearings which needed to be changed at regular intervals.

For this particular engine, it was rebuilt sometime in the 90's, the liners I pulled out had 1990's dates on them and someone had noted the hours on one of them, it had less than 500 hours on it since then. Rust and corrosion in the cylinders from non use caused it to need rebuild.

If you are going to have an extended period of non-use in your detroit, one thing you can do is block off the exhaust and intake so that no sea breeze blows through the thing. It's better to run it every couple of weeks but keeping the ocean breeze out of it will also help a lot. Mine has the emergency shut down flaps and I plan to keep them in the closed position just like a sea cock when not using the engine. There is always at least one cylinder that has intake ports and exhaust valves in the open position so there is a free path for a breeze to flow right through the engine pretty much all the time.

Sunchaser: Yes I really like the layout of the aft cabin Uniflite. I know it's not a trawler, but it is well suited to a live aboard couple. This particular boat was used as a live aboard for many years and the house systems were in pretty good shape as is the cabinetry.

Unfortunately the running gear was neglected, but that's why I got the boat for a very low price, realizing it would be my hobby to bring back those systems before the boat could be used. Something happened with the port engine and the previous owner didn't address it and started using only the starboard engine. It sat for at least 10 years unused. The starboard engine is in good shape since it was run fairly regularly.
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Old 01-29-2020, 12:30 PM   #82
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As part of overhauling the engine I'm also replacing all of the hoses. Fuel, coolant, raw water, oil and trans cooler all have hoses of various types and sizes.

All of the fuel, oil and trans cooler lines are pressure hoses made of re-usable hydraulic fittings. I have replaced the hose in these fittings by buying bulk hose from a hydraulic hose shop. I asked fora quote to have all new hoses made with crimp fittings so I could just bolt them on, they estimated around $1,000 for the hoses. By re-using the fittings I have and assembling the hoses myself, it is less than $300 for the same hoses. They said that the fittings I have and the hoses they use are good for 2500 psi (in general, it varies by size of the hose) and are rated about 10X higher than I need for engine oil pressure duties.



Here is a couple I've redone. It doesn't take very long to do.

I spent three hours last night dry fitting all of the coolant lines, fittings, hoses, clamps, etc... and making a list of any hardware I want to replace due to corrosion. Once I get those parts together it should get final assembly pretty quickly.
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Old 01-29-2020, 12:42 PM   #83
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As part of overhauling the engine I'm also replacing all of the hoses. Fuel, coolant, raw water, oil and trans cooler all have hoses of various types and sizes.

All of the fuel, oil and trans cooler lines are pressure hoses made of re-usable hydraulic fittings. I have replaced the hose in these fittings by buying bulk hose from a hydraulic hose shop. I asked fora quote to have all new hoses made with crimp fittings so I could just bolt them on, they estimated around $1,000 for the hoses. By re-using the fittings I have and assembling the hoses myself, it is less than $300 for the same hoses. They said that the fittings I have and the hoses they use are good for 2500 psi (in general, it varies by size of the hose) and are rated about 10X higher than I need for engine oil pressure duties.



Here is a couple I've redone. It doesn't take very long to do.

I spent three hours last night dry fitting all of the coolant lines, fittings, hoses, clamps, etc... and making a list of any hardware I want to replace due to corrosion. Once I get those parts together it should get final assembly pretty quickly.

I take it you were able to sort out what hose type is compatible with each fitting type? The few times I've looked at this my eyes started to glaze over trying to figure it out. Each manufacturer will tell which of their fittings work with each of their hose types, but trying to match each to an SAE or ISO standard, and cross between manufacturers is where I lost it.
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:02 PM   #84
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I take it you were able to sort out what hose type is compatible with each fitting type? The few times I've looked at this my eyes started to glaze over trying to figure it out. Each manufacturer will tell which of their fittings work with each of their hose types, but trying to match each to an SAE or ISO standard, and cross between manufacturers is where I lost it.
The hose shop figured that out for me, they knew exactly what worked with what.
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:10 PM   #85
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Those reusable fittings are nice. If you keep reusable hose onboard you can repair a hose anywhere you are yourself. All you need is a decent vice and wrenches.
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Old 01-30-2020, 07:34 AM   #86
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"Those reusable fittings are nice. If you keep reusable hose onboard you can repair a hose anywhere you are yourself. All you need is a decent vice and wrenches."


If purchasing these fittings , be sure to purchase swivels on BOTH ends .
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Old 02-10-2020, 01:21 PM   #87
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Very close to startup now, all that remains is to complete a couple of small hoses/connections in the cooling system, pressure test it, then hook up/prime the fuel. Starter spun it over last night very nicely and all the adjustments have been made (valve clearance, injector timing, rack controls).
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Old 02-10-2020, 03:48 PM   #88
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Need to see Video with good sound of the first time run!!!!! Great work.
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Old 02-12-2020, 12:26 AM   #89
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Added some dial gauges for the test run.



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Old 02-12-2020, 10:44 AM   #90
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To prep for a first startup, I hooked up an electric diesel pump to prime the fuel system, filled the fluids (10 gallons coolant, 7.5 gallons Delo 100 Oil), wired up the starter with a push button and plumbed the fuel from a jerry can of diesel.

I put vice grips on the rack and disconnected the governor. This is done so that you have direct control over the fuel and can start/stop the motor with the vice grips. I had never done that before on a detroit, so this was a new experience. This allows me to crank it with the full 'off' a bit and prime the injectors. The injectors are a through flow so a lot of return fuel goes to the tank which really helps purge the air.

I had cranked about 2 seconds before my friend started videoing, with the fuel in the cutoff position. In the video, the first part of the cranking, I kept the fuel at cut off and then about 5 seconds in I started opening the injectors up a bit and it fired pretty much right away. The second time cranking it I opened it up more and it fired up.

https://youtu.be/d8wLLwONlII
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Old 02-12-2020, 10:53 AM   #91
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And not only does he have a Detroit to mess with, he has a Cessna!!!!! Is that a 170? I had a 170B.
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Old 02-12-2020, 01:52 PM   #92
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Cool. Nice work!
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Old 02-12-2020, 01:53 PM   #93
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And not only does he have a Detroit to mess with, he has a Cessna!!!!! Is that a 170? I had a 170B.
It's a 140 that belongs to a friend. My plane is a LongEZ in another corner of the hangar. If he had a 170B, I'd probably try to buy it from him, I really like those.
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Old 02-12-2020, 03:10 PM   #94
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Cool. Nice work!
What he said. Congratulations!
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Old 02-13-2020, 10:47 PM   #95
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Very nice and most informative thread. There's a pair of 8V71's or 92's in my future so the more vids I watch the better.

Looks like you weren't running any raw water, just kept it short enough to not get hot. Did you leave the raw water impeller out?

And, did you consider putting a filter in the fresh water system? Or are you going to flus h it out now?

Thanks.
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Old 02-14-2020, 01:55 PM   #96
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Very nice and most informative thread. There's a pair of 8V71's or 92's in my future so the more vids I watch the better.

Looks like you weren't running any raw water, just kept it short enough to not get hot. Did you leave the raw water impeller out?

And, did you consider putting a filter in the fresh water system? Or are you going to flush it out now?

Thanks.
Oscar,

I was not running the raw water system at all. The pump was not mounted to the engine. With the new rebuild, I really don't want to run it much, just enough to finish tuning it up and setting the idle. I put a manual temp gauge and the coolant only reached 85 degrees, the thermostat didn't even open yet.

The service manual says not to run it more than 5 minutes after a rebuild before putting a load on it. This is really common for rebuilds, you want to run them hard right away while respecting RPM limitations for the break in period. This is to seat the rings and wear them to the face of the cylinder bores. Failure to follow this protocol can result in an engine that burns more oil than desired.

I have not considered a coolant filter, I'll be flushing and replacing all of the fluids after the first few hours of use on the boat.

The 8V92 is known for having higher levels of bearing wear than the other detroits. A turbo charged 8V71 might be susceptible to that as well. This isn't a big deal but most operators replace the main and rod bearings as preventative maintenance on a schedule. This can be done in place if you can get the oil pan off, or you might have to lift the engine to do it.

For me, I really prefer the inline engines (no matter the brand) because it is easier to get to both sides of them for service and repair.

If you are interested in Detroit Diesel videos, you can't beat Bus Grease Monkey on Youtube. His channel is full of rebuilds, tune ups, service, etc... you can skip past the bus parts if you only want to see the engine stuff.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTe...uu-odJld157e6Q

He did a good video of adjusting the rack a while back which was really helpful for me. I read the description in the service manual, it's a very long two page wall of text and it's really hard to understand what they are telling you to do. Seeing his video on it put all the pieces together for me. It's mainly done by 'feel' and how do you write that in a service manual?
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Old 02-14-2020, 03:53 PM   #97
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Sound Great . Thanks for the video.
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Old 05-26-2020, 12:03 PM   #98
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This is a bit out of sequence time-line wise if you have followed my uniflite refit thread, but I had been chasing down an oil leak that originated around the remote oil filter adapter hose fittings. I tried extra teflon tape, liquid teflon, etc... but nothing would stop the leak that appeared to be coming from the 3/4 NPT threads/hose going to the oil filter.

On close inspection, I found a crack in the casting, apparently I had over-tightened the hose and cracked the housing, I circled in it red in this photo.



This resulted in a steady stream leak. I ordered a used housing from Powerline Components, found the part number right on the casting after removing it.

The housing sits behind the oil cooler housing, so all of the coolant had to be drained. I get about 8 gallons out of it, with a couple of gallons left in the system somewhere since it holds 10. I also took the opportunity to replace the coolant drain plug.

Here you can see the housing sitting behind the oil cooler housing/heat exchanger.



I also sourced belts for the raw water pump. The J&T uses a belt driven pump and Gates Green Strip 9435 is the correct belt. It uses two in a pair.



Final assembly including the raw water pump, fuel cooler, and re-installation of the exhaust manifold will happen with the engine in the boat. The static test runs are completed, all issues addressed and the engine is now in the boat.
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Old 05-29-2020, 06:45 AM   #99
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SB, was wondering if you feel that you need that hp rating on your boat - do you find yourself running it hard and fast?

It would be quite easy to de-rate the engines a bit if you don't need all that horsepower. Running 6-71's at a continuous 60% instead of 30% (for example) makes for happy Jimmies. I had that problem on mine, ran a wee bit too low, and that big blower was cooling the block down too much.
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Old 05-29-2020, 08:30 AM   #100
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SB, was wondering if you feel that you need that hp rating on your boat - do you find yourself running it hard and fast?

It would be quite easy to de-rate the engines a bit if you don't need all that horsepower. Running 6-71's at a continuous 60% instead of 30% (for example) makes for happy Jimmies. I had that problem on mine, ran a wee bit too low, and that big blower was cooling the block down too much.
I don't really know, I've not run the boat with both engines yet, the one engine was not running when I purchased the boat. The only difference between the J&T and stock Detroit is the injectors, so some N60 injectors would put it back to stock power levels. I installed N80s per the J&T configuration as that should match up with the propeller loading curve, where the N60s would fall short.

The stock power rating from the factory was 170 hp, J&T rated it at 190HP, with the N80 injectors so if the throttle is held back a bit then the extra power isn't used. No matter the amount of power rated, running the engine hard enough to get the exhaust and combustion temps up on a regular basis will help keep carbon and other build ups at bay and is what I intend to do.
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