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Old 05-31-2021, 08:22 AM   #21
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I just wanted to repost Cigatoo’s link to the stainless elbows. https://hdimarine.net/?s=Lehman&post_type=product%5B/url

I cannot believe i did not realize they made that elbow in stainless! I have to admit I almost did an impulse purchase, lmao. Thanks for posting Cigatoo.

The 2715 is not listed as a one of the engines in the product description, but it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, so to speak, so it must fit the 2715.

Are there downside to stainless? I know that sort of a dumb question, but since i am gonna spend an 80% premium for stainless, just wanted to make sure its worth it.

Thoughts?
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Old 06-01-2021, 10:54 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Pete Meisinger View Post
Personally, I would buy new elbows and gaskets but I would NOT install them. Keep them for when the present ones fail. This forum is literally full of members who are asking for advice on how to get broken exhaust elbows out of the manifold, etc. It can be an easy job but it can be a real pain.

Why not get new ones and give the old ones a substantial rap with a hammer. It might tell you something. And since you will have to remove the exhaust host anyway to replace them, I agree that you should take a look inside.

But my best advice is to leave them alone.

If, and when they fail, it will not be a catastrophic failure. It won't damage your engine or boat. The cabin and engine compartment may get smelly or wet but you will be able to get to port or finish your trip.

pete
If you are lucky it will rust through when it fails. Worst case it clogs with rust / rot and backs up salt water into the engine. I would consider that catastrophic. I bet the engine would agree.
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Old 06-01-2021, 12:10 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alisske View Post
I just wanted to repost Cigatoo’s link to the stainless elbows. https://hdimarine.net/?s=Lehman&post...product%5B/url

I cannot believe i did not realize they made that elbow in stainless! I have to admit I almost did an impulse purchase, lmao. Thanks for posting Cigatoo.

The 2715 is not listed as a one of the engines in the product description, but it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, so to speak, so it must fit the 2715.

Are there downside to stainless? I know that sort of a dumb question, but since i am gonna spend an 80% premium for stainless, just wanted to make sure its worth it.

Thoughts?
Stainless can be treacherous due to crevice corrosion which happens in corrosive environments with little oxygen.

The photo below is a shaft key from a Groco Model K manual head. It has spent many years submerged in an oxygen-free, corrosive environment and corroded significantly. The bronze shaft to which it was attached was in good shape.

I don't know if crevice corrosion can be an issue in exhaust elbows but would suspect American Diesel has an opinion on this.
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Old 06-01-2021, 12:42 PM   #24
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Elbow looks new but as suggested, pull exhaust hose off to check.
The anti-seize suggestion applies to any bolt anywhere near the rear of the engine.
The drips from the shaft turn into a fine salt mist and instant rust.
I would add hoses and clamps to your replacement budget.
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Old 06-04-2021, 12:57 PM   #25
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As others have said buy a replacement Stainless one. Once you have bought it I would install it. If you wish to carry an emergency spare perhaps hang onto the old one. Waiting for it to fail is in my opinion a risky strategy and one that’s has little merit and the cash has already gone out of the boat account for a new one. I changed mine along with all the coolers, fluids, belts, etc when taking over custody of our boat. Of all the things that can and will go wrong I try and eliminate the easy stuff. What ever you choose, good luck!
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Old 06-04-2021, 01:28 PM   #26
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For all things Lehman Ford, contact American Diesel. (804) 435-3107
Also, on their website they've got a lot of information about all these engines.

For those of you not familiar with them, Bob Smith was CEO of Lehman Ford USA. He worked with Roger Lehman to marinize the Ford tractor engine. I took his diesel engine class at TrawlerFest many years ago. Bob's deceased.

For many years, Bob wrote the Engineers Corner Q&A in the MTOA magazine (Marine Trawler Owners Association). I know he's addressed the elbows many times with pictures.

American Diesel is now in the hands of his son, Brian. They have all the parts, specs, tips and tricks, and so on about the engines. After Lehman Ford discontinued production, Bob started building the American Diesel engines with all the improvements developed over the years. He built about 100 engines a year.

Everybody had Bob's phone number, you should have American Diesel's on speed dial. LOL
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Old 06-04-2021, 01:39 PM   #27
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Lehman elbow

Taking the elbows off can be a challenge. Years ago, I replaced mine and broke one of the bolts off. I tried everything with no success. $200 later a professional with an acetylene torch got it out. When I installed with new ones, I used anti seize. Last year, I replaced those ones. Again, one of the bolts would not come out but I did not break or strip the head. I ended up using an air powered impact wrench and that worked. I would recommend the impact wrench. Start with low torque and build up as needed...
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Old 06-04-2021, 05:42 PM   #28
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Exhaust risers

On my 120 Lehman’s I have Chrysler type exhaust risers. Knowing they are guaranteed to rust through, I installed new ones. Here is what one of the old ones looked like:
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Old 06-04-2021, 05:44 PM   #29
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We had to cut one of the bottom bolts on the adapter between the Lowe elbow and exhaust manifold. Don’t forget to chase the female threads on you exhaust manifold before installing the new elbow.
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Old 06-05-2021, 07:31 AM   #30
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The key to ensuring those bolts come out easily is, indeed, an anti-seize compound but that is not enough. Once a year, sometimes sooner, I loosen the bolts and retighten. Do not expect them to not possibly to become seized again after many years in place. Takes maybe 10 minutes to do both engines. They loosen quite easily every time I do it.
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Taking the elbows off can be a challenge. Years ago, I replaced mine and broke one of the bolts off. I tried everything with no success. $200 later a professional with an acetylene torch got it out. When I installed with new ones, I used anti seize. Last year, I replaced those ones. Again, one of the bolts would not come out but I did not break or strip the head. I ended up using an air powered impact wrench and that worked. I would recommend the impact wrench. Start with low torque and build up as needed...
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Old 06-05-2021, 07:59 AM   #31
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When you inspect or replace your exhaust elbow, chase the threads. Any little piece of rust, thread or debris left behind will only make it harder the next time. Also, loosening the bolts when the engine is hot can make things easier.
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Old 06-05-2021, 08:05 AM   #32
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A no brainier. Buy an exhaust elbow from American Diesel and CHANGE it. In the worst case, the elbow was at its end of life and you would have prevented a dangerous failure. In the best case, you would have a spare elbow and a date to plan its replacement.
If I remember correctly, in salt water the elbow should be replaced (unconditionally) after only three years, extended up to five years in fresh or lake water.
For the modest price of an elbow, it is worthwhile replacing it at an interval that assumes the worst case.
Trust me. It is worth it. Don't ask me how I know this.
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Old 06-05-2021, 09:34 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Cigatoo View Post
If you are lucky it will rust through when it fails. Worst case it clogs with rust / rot and backs up salt water into the engine. I would consider that catastrophic. I bet the engine would agree.
Yes, a hydrolocked piston engine is not a desirable thing.
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Old 06-05-2021, 06:43 PM   #34
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After removing the bolts wouldn’t replacing them with studs be a better bet ? Stainless steel bolts with brass manifold nuts makes sense to me.
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Old 06-08-2021, 01:39 PM   #35
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I had one that looked perfect outside. A tap withva ball peen hammer caused it to crumble. Re maintenance, recommend you plan a top end recondition and cylinder inspection at 5,000 hrs
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