Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-24-2020, 09:54 AM   #21
Guru
 
Brooksie's Avatar
 
City: Cape Cod, MA
Vessel Name: Island Seeker
Vessel Model: Willard 36 Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,199
Quote:
Originally Posted by tedt_2778 View Post
I am about to do this job on my Golden Star 38. I will need to shift/slide the starboard engine forward with crow bars as there is not enough room to move the shaft back 6" before hitting my packing gland. My main concern is a bottle jack on the bottom of the hull lifting/supporting the 6 cylinder Perkins I am worried I may but a hole in the bottom of my boat, still in the water - any thoughts?
I have Perkins HT6.354 in my lobster boat. I have done this several times but my keel will accommodate a 2x3 first to spread the load. I have also lifted my engine using cross beams, ½” threaded rod, & coupling nuts to raise it enough to remove the oil pan, check the bearings and replace the oil pumps.
I don’t think you actually need 6” to get the transmission out, more like 2 – 3” for a Velvet Drive
__________________
Advertisement

Brooksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2020, 11:02 AM   #22
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11,806
We just did one of mine. Our engine and transmission were out so it was pretty easy. We could have gotten the damper out by sliding the transmission back about 3” but since we had the engine out we went ahead and slid the transmission back about a foot just to make it easy.
__________________

__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you aren’t one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2020, 11:30 AM   #23
Member
 
City: Sausalito
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 8
Thanks for the great advise, the stbd engine sits down in between the lateral stringers hence needing to bottle jack from fibreglass hull. I could rig a beam across the flooring above the engine room giving both top and bottom support.
tedt_2778 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2020, 11:33 AM   #24
Member
 
City: Sausalito
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 8
I guess I may be able to lift the back end enough so the gearbox clears the shaft and then pull back. Like the idea of threaded Bar to make a jack - Thanks
tedt_2778 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2020, 12:05 PM   #25
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11,806
Get some all thread the same size as the transmission mounting bolts. Cut it about 8” long. Remove a couple of bolts and thread in the all thread. That will allow the transmission to be slid back enough to get to the damper plate. And you won’t have to support the weight of the transmission. Depending on the weight of the transmission you might want 4 pieces of all thread.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you aren’t one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2020, 11:11 PM   #26
Guru
 
kapnd's Avatar
 
City: hawaii
Vessel Name: #31
Vessel Model: ex-Navy MUB 50 fish/cruise
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 708
I put a sandbag down first, with a bit of plywood under the jack to spread the load evenly.
__________________
You can lead a horse to water,
But you can't make him ski...
kapnd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2020, 12:23 AM   #27
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11,806
I had the engine and transmission out and on the deck in the salon. I had fabricated some LVLs into temporary stringers for it to sit on. I took a floor jack with plywood under the oil pan on the transmission and used it to roll the transmission back far enough to get the old plate out and the new one in. Simple and easy.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you aren’t one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2020, 06:56 AM   #28
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 4,247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Comodave View Post
Get some all thread the same size as the transmission mounting bolts. Cut it about 8” long. Remove a couple of bolts and thread in the all thread. That will allow the transmission to be slid back enough to get to the damper plate. And you won’t have to support the weight of the transmission. Depending on the weight of the transmission you might want 4 pieces of all thread.
This is the way to go if at all possible.
__________________
Jay Leonard

New Port Richey,Fl
jleonard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2020, 09:20 AM   #29
Newbie
 
City: Summerdale
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 3
I removed my damper and it just fell apart. It was in pieces. I still cannot get the engine to turn. I'm suspecting their are pieces still left in flywheel. Is it hard to remove? I'm stuck in Orange beach and a possible tropical depression in enroute. Should I be able to turn engine? Is their a trick to getting it to turn. Flywheel seems like it has some serious torque. Please I need advice quick!!
THE FROG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2020, 09:31 AM   #30
Guru
 
Brooksie's Avatar
 
City: Cape Cod, MA
Vessel Name: Island Seeker
Vessel Model: Willard 36 Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,199
Quote:
Originally Posted by THE FROG View Post
I removed my damper and it just fell apart. It was in pieces. I still cannot get the engine to turn. I'm suspecting their are pieces still left in flywheel. Is it hard to remove? I'm stuck in Orange beach and a possible tropical depression in enroute. Should I be able to turn engine? Is their a trick to getting it to turn. Flywheel seems like it has some serious torque. Please I need advice quick!!

Lay out the pieces you have and see what is missing, then you will know what you are looking for. I don't know what you are trying to turn the engine with, but to free up the jammed piece, you want to turn it backwards a little. Get a mechanics magnet and sweep around the bell housing also look with a mirror and flashlight. A mechanics "3 fingered grabber" is the tool of choice to pull out pieces that the magnet won't lift. You may, in the end, have to shore up the engine and pull the bell housing if the rear mounts are on it.
Brooksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2020, 07:13 PM   #31
Newbie
 
City: Summerdale
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 3
Thanks man I ended up pulling the bell housing and gear. It was a pain in the butt. I got it all fixed up headed out the Frog handled weather like a champ. All this for one smal piece of spring I pressed home and then I lost thrust. Anchored in direct winds and rough waters to inspect the issue. Apparently my transmission oil cooler is leaking internally. I lost all my transmission oil. I allowed to cool filled it and anchored in Ingrams Bayou. Which is very secluded. Holding out here in the bayou until storm subsides then will determine if I can either fix the leak or bypass and limped It home. I flew Chinooks for the Army and even though I am not familiar with boats I have definitely learned how to improvise when Murphy rears his ugly head. Take care all and wish me luck. Weather report here in Orange beach is crappy as Hell but oddly calming and very exciting. Well I am gonna grab a drink and enjoy the show.
THE FROG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2020, 07:20 PM   #32
Guru
 
Brooksie's Avatar
 
City: Cape Cod, MA
Vessel Name: Island Seeker
Vessel Model: Willard 36 Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,199
Quote:
Originally Posted by THE FROG View Post
Thanks man I ended up pulling the bell housing and gear. It was a pain in the butt. I got it all fixed up headed out the Frog handled weather like a champ. All this for one smal piece of spring I pressed home and then I lost thrust. Anchored in direct winds and rough waters to inspect the issue. Apparently my transmission oil cooler is leaking internally. I lost all my transmission oil. I allowed to cool filled it and anchored in Ingrams Bayou. Which is very secluded. Holding out here in the bayou until storm subsides then will determine if I can either fix the leak or bypass and limped It home. I flew Chinooks for the Army and even though I am not familiar with boats I have definitely learned how to improvise when Murphy rears his ugly head. Take care all and wish me luck. Weather report here in Orange beach is crappy as Hell but oddly calming and very exciting. Well I am gonna grab a drink and enjoy the show.
Isolate the tube in the cooler that is leaking and, if the offending tule lines up with the water ports, block both ends with a tapered wood plugs. Good luck
Brooksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2020, 05:44 PM   #33
Member
 
City: St. Petersburg
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 6
Golden Star thin gelcoat/fiberglass hulls???

I know this is an old post but I see you have a Golden Star trawler. Im looking at a 1988 42 Golden Star but I've never heard of these. I inspected the hull and bridge and they seem very thin!! Not sure if this is one of those boats that has very little gelcoat /fiberglass. Do you have any opinion or heard any comments regarding this with Golden Star trawlers? Any input will be greatly appreciated. Thank You!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooksie View Post
I have Perkins HT6.354 in my lobster boat. I have done this several times but my keel will accommodate a 2x3 first to spread the load. I have also lifted my engine using cross beams, ½” threaded rod, & coupling nuts to raise it enough to remove the oil pan, check the bearings and replace the oil pumps.
I don’t think you actually need 6” to get the transmission out, more like 2 – 3” for a Velvet Drive
__________________

ervonna is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×