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Old 04-17-2020, 08:40 PM   #21
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Sadly in a time and place like mine, there aren't many qualified professionals, a lot of them are self proclaimed without any resumes to go along with their claims
I have learned to trust the yard I have used for the last 4 yers.
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Old 04-17-2020, 08:46 PM   #22
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Greetings,
I would highly recommend a good, proper fitting wrench on the hex nut. Pipe wrench anywhere else because IF you chew up that hex nut with the pipe wrench, you then create a bigger problem.
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Old 04-17-2020, 09:27 PM   #23
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Greetings,
I would highly recommend a good, proper fitting wrench on the hex nut. Pipe wrench anywhere else because IF you chew up that hex nut with the pipe wrench, you then create a bigger problem.
I'm currently fabricating a 28 inch wrench handle just for this purpose. Definitely will look out for that problem...
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Old 04-24-2020, 01:43 PM   #24
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I'm still useing packing ; easy to replace so it drippes a little easy to repack even in the water(if you fast enough and have a good belge pump)
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Old 04-24-2020, 02:00 PM   #25
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FYI, I had a Carver that used a taper on the end of the shaft and a nut inside the flex joint housing. You had to disassemble the flex coupling, push the shaft to the stern, remove the nut and use a pulley puller to pull it off the shaft.
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Old 04-24-2020, 04:20 PM   #26
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Looks like the importance of galvanic protection and basic maintenance is highlighted. ��*♂️
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Old 04-24-2020, 05:44 PM   #27
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"...Removing the nut. I've already removed the set screws (i call them grub screws but same ol) without problem..."

Note that in the "morris" taper style couplers there often are usually two sets of stacked screws with the shorter one deep in the coupler bearing directly upon the facet of the nut. It can be really difficult to be seen as is only about 1/8th inch long. Make certain there isn't second set screw. The stainless collar has two O rings that are against the shaft. once dissembled they can be replaced if leaking. The flexible bellows are the tension between the carbon face seal and the stainless steel disk. If the carbon face is scarred or has debris on it's face it will leak. You set the tension by compressing the bellows by sliding the Stainless steel disk back against the carbon disk toward the stern and locking it's set screws against the shaft.
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Old 04-24-2020, 05:56 PM   #28
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Did you look down the threads of the grub screw holes? Often, they use TWO grub screws, one acting as a jam screw for the one doing the work... You usually find it after you cut the coupler off the shaft and then say Duh!!!
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Old 04-25-2020, 05:35 AM   #29
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KP,
If you are making a custom wrench for the hex nut, I would make it similar to a flare nut wrench- this will allow you to catch (4) of the (6) sides of the nut and will handle more torque. Another trick an old mechanic taught me is to use Bees wax. You should be able to find that in your location. Apply heat to the nut with a propane torch or a heat gun, then hold the bees wax against the threads. It will get all the way inside the threads- I have used this after using penetrating oil , heat, etc and was amazed when it came loose. You can also drill a small hole 1/4” in the side of the nut and only go in 1/8 inch. This will allow you to put a drift punch in the hole depression and hit it with a hammer in the direction of loosening. Percussion is your friend when trying to get something unstuck.
Good Luck.
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Old 05-02-2020, 09:08 PM   #30
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Thanks to all those who took the time to read and reply to my post. I still have not succeeded in loosening the nut but have to set that task aside for now as I have to prioritize issues. The flexible drive coupler is not gripping the shaft correctly and often does not transfer all the power from the engine. This is especially difficult to handle when docking and has already been the cause of a tangle. I'd rather keep the topics separated so I'll be making a new post soon.

Thanks again to all
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Old 05-03-2020, 06:05 AM   #31
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There are always large things on board that need a turn to remove.


A chain wrench as plumbers use will do nuts or oil filters , and are robust enough for a hammer or extension handle if required.
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Old 05-03-2020, 07:49 AM   #32
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There are always large things on board that need a turn to remove.


A chain wrench as plumbers use will do nuts or oil filters , and are robust enough for a hammer or extension handle if required.
If you start hitting the handle of a chain wrench with a hammer, watch for the bounce back. A dead blow hammer might be best.
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