Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-05-2021, 03:10 PM   #1
Member
 
City: Portland, OR
Vessel Name: Forty Six & 2
Vessel Model: 1984 Albin 49 Tri-Cabin
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 5
Wood to use for furring strips

Hello, I thought I would ask the collective here about this.
I will be installing new headliner/wall panels, and adding insulation behind the panels. To accomplish this I will be attaching with epoxy furring strips that the panels will attach to with insulation between the strips.

What type of wood would be good to use for the furring strips?

Initially, I was using Red Balau, which is used for decking, but this seems like overkill and is expensive. Other options I am thinking about are white oak, red cedar, or just plain marine plywood cut into strips.

Has anyone done this and what did you use?
__________________
Advertisement

J0k3r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2021, 03:18 PM   #2
Guru
 
Cigatoo's Avatar
 
City: Narragansett Bay
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 1,175
I bought a rough cut 5/4 piece of 1x8 teak by 8 feet long. Round over each edge with a router, cut a 1/2 inch strip on a table saw and repeat. It made nice batons. The teak plank cost me somewhere around $200.
__________________

__________________
Charlie0
Cigatoo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2021, 04:18 PM   #3
Guru
 
City: gulf coast
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 3,441
If they are hidden just use pressure treated
bayview is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2021, 04:51 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
guy with a boat's Avatar
 
City: SoCal and Vancouver Island
Vessel Name: Tortuga
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 63
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 240
Cedar can smell pretty strongly and isn't as stable as some others. Teak works but way too expensive and not necessary. Pressure treated is toxic (sawdust etc) and the cut edges aren't protected. Plywood isn't as good as solid wood at holding fasteners.


I would use white oak. It doesn't warp easily, is rot resistant and moisture tolerant, easy to work with, and reasonably priced. Its dense enough to hold fasteners and its widely available.



You could probably get away with almost anything (big box store pine/fir), but use white oak and you know you won't ever have to go back and do that job again.
guy with a boat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2021, 04:59 PM   #5
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11,167
Even Poplar. It is easy to work and will hold screws well. It is a reasonably priced option.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you aren’t one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2021, 07:16 PM   #6
Member
 
City: Portland, OR
Vessel Name: Forty Six & 2
Vessel Model: 1984 Albin 49 Tri-Cabin
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by guy with a boat View Post

I would use white oak. It doesn't warp easily, is rot resistant and moisture tolerant, easy to work with, and reasonably priced. Its dense enough to hold fasteners and its widely available.
Thanks, I think I am leaning to white oak, for the reasons you mention. Also, I only want to do this once.
J0k3r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2021, 08:20 PM   #7
Guru
 
mvweebles's Avatar
 
City: Saint Petersburg
Vessel Name: Weebles
Vessel Model: 1970 Willard 36 Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 2,534
I don't know balau wood so cannot comment.

I have used mahogany. It's a good wood and fairly priced, on par with white oak.

I would not use cedar as it is soft and does not hold fasteners as well as a hardwood. If paint is in the future, it does not hold that as well either. Fir would be better, but it's expensive for quality wood.

White oak would be fine. Poplar too, though it is rot prone with any moisture.

Personally, if go with mahogany (sapel). It's expensive, but all hardwoods are.

Peter .
__________________
M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Trawler
Current Location: Ensenada MX
mvweebles is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2021, 08:28 PM   #8
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 12,116
Meranti seems to match teak and red cedar in grain. Just don`t build a hull with it.
For us, red cedar is a beautiful Australian native timber. Your "red cedar" may be quite different.
__________________
BruceK
2005 Integrity 386 "Sojourn"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2021, 08:56 PM   #9
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 4,210
1. Is this visible? No
2. Is this expose to weathering? No
3. Is it structural? No

Use good quality plywood, glaze it if you want to add strength and I am 100% sure it will still be there when you will bite the dust.
Even properly sealed dry dimensional lumber like SPF will survive you without a doubt.

L
Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2021, 09:51 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
guy with a boat's Avatar
 
City: SoCal and Vancouver Island
Vessel Name: Tortuga
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 63
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou_tribal View Post
Use good quality plywood, glaze it if you want to add strength and I am 100% sure it will still be there when you will bite the dust.
Even properly sealed dry dimensional lumber like SPF will survive you without a doubt.

L
I’m curious: what do you mean “glaze it if you want to add strength”?

I don’t recognize the term.
guy with a boat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2021, 10:47 PM   #11
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 4,210
Quote:
Originally Posted by guy with a boat View Post
I’m curious: what do you mean “glaze it if you want to add strength”?

I don’t recognize the term.
You can glue battens to their underlying supports with epoxy and if you want to add strength you can glazed them with fiberglass (meaning adding epoxy impregnated fiberglass cloth over them to reinforce them).

But for the usage the PO describes it would be just overkill. He just want some battens where to screw on cosmetic panels, nothing structural or anything that would need to held heavy weight.

L
Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2021, 11:23 PM   #12
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11,167
I usually coat the wood with epoxy before installing it. Then if it will show I paint it if not just leave it and use thickened epoxy to glue it to the boat.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you aren’t one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2021, 08:34 AM   #13
Guru
 
catalinajack's Avatar
 
City: Edgewater, MD
Vessel Name: Catalina Jack
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,311
I'm not understanding why pressure treated is not a good choice. It will last longer than the boat and no need for epoxy coating. Toxicity of sawdust? Wear a mask. Plenty around these days. Aesthetics? It will all be covered, no need for painting. Fasteners will hold well but will fasteners even be used anyway?
catalinajack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2021, 08:50 AM   #14
Guru
 
fryedaze's Avatar
 
City: Solomons Island Md
Vessel Name: Fryedaze
Vessel Model: MC 42 (Overseas Co) Monk 42
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,513
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvweebles View Post
I don't know balau wood so cannot comment.

I have used mahogany. It's a good wood and fairly priced, on par with white oak.

I would not use cedar as it is soft and does not hold fasteners as well as a hardwood. If paint is in the future, it does not hold that as well either. Fir would be better, but it's expensive for quality wood.

White oak would be fine. Poplar too, though it is rot prone with any moisture.

Personally, if go with mahogany (sapel). It's expensive, but all hardwoods are.

Peter .
My vote would be Mahogany. Price is ok and the workability is better than most.
__________________
Dave Frye
Fryedaze, MC 42 (Monk 42') 1989 Overseas Co
https://mvfryedaze.blogspot.com/
fryedaze is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2021, 09:04 AM   #15
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,325
Greetings,
Mr. c. It is my understanding that PT wood (some types of) does not play well with epoxy. IF an adhesive other than epoxy will be used it may be OK.


I'm with M. L_t on this one. Use plywood strips. An exterior grade will have water proof glue so moisture shouldn't be a problem. Cheap, easy to work with and will flex to conform to any radius. I don't see much advantage in coating the slats with epoxy for this particular application. A coat of paint would probably serve as well if you're concerned about sealing the plywood.



I have had good success with using construction adhesive in dry areas on board. A few advantages of the tube adhesive are no mixing, exact application amounts, no drips and easy clean-up.


__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2021, 12:08 PM   #16
Guru
 
mvweebles's Avatar
 
City: Saint Petersburg
Vessel Name: Weebles
Vessel Model: 1970 Willard 36 Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 2,534
Quote:
Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
Greetings,
Mr. c. It is my understanding that PT wood (some types of) does not play well with epoxy. IF an adhesive other than epoxy will be used it may be OK.


I'm with M. L_t on this one. Use plywood strips. An exterior grade will have water proof glue so moisture shouldn't be a problem. Cheap, easy to work with and will flex to conform to any radius. I don't see much advantage in coating the slats with epoxy for this particular application. A coat of paint would probably serve as well if you're concerned about sealing the plywood.



I have had good success with using construction adhesive in dry areas on board. A few advantages of the tube adhesive are no mixing, exact application amounts, no drips and easy clean-up.


PT also eats standard fasteners so special screws are recommended. I assume SS would be fine, but don't know for sure.

Not talking about much wood. Not sure why not use traditional marine grade materials such as mahogany.
__________________
M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Trawler
Current Location: Ensenada MX
mvweebles is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2021, 12:21 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
guy with a boat's Avatar
 
City: SoCal and Vancouver Island
Vessel Name: Tortuga
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 63
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by catalinajack View Post
I'm not understanding why pressure treated is not a good choice. It will last longer than the boat and no need for epoxy coating. Toxicity of sawdust? Wear a mask. Plenty around these days. Aesthetics? It will all be covered, no need for painting. Fasteners will hold well but will fasteners even be used anyway?
If you are referring to my comment, I’m just not of fan of pressure-treated for anything other than a few construction applications, such as next to concrete that might have some moisture in it.

The treated part doesn’t penetrate all the wood, so when you rip it into strips (or otherwise make cuts) you have no protection on the cut sides. Now you don’t have uniform rot resistance and you still have to deal with the toxicity issues with no great benefit.

Plywood works but the screw-holding isn’t as good as solid wood, if that is a factor.

For this application, probably any kind of wood will do fine. The boat shouldn’t have enough moisture inside to be an issue. We didn’t discuss what quantity is needed, but I didn’t get the idea that the volume is enough for cost to be a major issue. If it were me, I would go to the wood supplier and buy either white oak or mahogany, depending on which was a better price and available.

If this was boating season, this thread would be 2 posts long. I guess we have to talk about something in the meantime.
__________________

guy with a boat is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
diy, furring, insulation

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×