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Old 08-02-2020, 11:59 AM   #9041
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Originally Posted by makobuilders View Post
You could power most of the world's pleasure boats with a single Jimmy.... oh, one can only dream....

Did you get a glimpse of that gorgeous bronze windlass and chain stopper with the beautiful verdigris?
And, the teak looking as though restoration needs apparent.
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Old 08-02-2020, 12:19 PM   #9042
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Art youíre not a romanticist are you???
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Old 08-02-2020, 12:21 PM   #9043
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Art you’re too fussy.
Bob’s teak looks fine to me.
I’d oil it a bit if it were mine.
A little Linseed oil (25%) and kerosene to drive it into the wood.
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Old 08-02-2020, 12:49 PM   #9044
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Art youíre not a romanticist are you???
I enjoy romanticism, in several ways... but... not for restoring teak surface!
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Old 08-02-2020, 12:52 PM   #9045
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Art youíre too fussy.
Bobís teak looks fine to me.
Iíd oil it a bit if it were mine.
A little Linseed oil (25%) and kerosene to drive it into the wood.
Surface refinishing is a form of restoration. Fussy is as fussy does!!
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Old 08-02-2020, 01:08 PM   #9046
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And, the teak looking as though restoration needs apparent.


Remember Bob has real teak, logged no doubt with the help of an elephant, fastened to solid wood with bronze screws made by an American machinist, and installed by a craftsman who apprenticed under generations of experience.

I think the decks look just like they were intended to look after 90+ years and hope Bob just proudly keeps them clean.
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Old 08-02-2020, 03:03 PM   #9047
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Remember Bob has real teak, logged no doubt with the help of an elephant, fastened to solid wood with bronze screws made by an American machinist, and installed by a craftsman who apprenticed under generations of experience.

I think the decks look just like they were intended to look after 90+ years and hope Bob just proudly keeps them clean.
When it comes to teak underfoot, 'white' is right.
Just the occasional salt water scrub, please.
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Old 08-02-2020, 03:06 PM   #9048
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Dosn’t salt water cause corrosion?

Like Island Cessna’s comment above.
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Old 08-02-2020, 03:12 PM   #9049
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Dosn’t salt water cause corrosion?

Like Island Cessna’s comment above.
That might cause a problem on a steel deck which is why I'll never own
another steel boat with teak decks.
On a wood boat with bronze fasteners the salt water helps preserve
the teak decks and keep away mold, etc.
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Old 08-02-2020, 04:24 PM   #9050
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So when you comment about teak decks on a steel boat, exactly what type of construction are you referring to?

My steel boat had deck beam angles and the deck was teak fastened to the frames directly. Then caulked as usual. There was no plywood or solid steel deck under the teak.

After 40 years, well, yes it was horrible. But that's real old-fashioned construction.
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Old 08-02-2020, 06:09 PM   #9051
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So when you comment about teak decks on a steel boat, exactly what type of construction are you referring to?

My steel boat had deck beam angles and the deck was teak fastened to the frames directly. Then caulked as usual. There was no plywood or solid steel deck under the teak.

After 40 years, well, yes it was horrible. But that's real old-fashioned construction.
My experience was with teak screwed down onto plywood which had been screwed
to the steel deck on a 1969 hull.
There was a steel lip coaming that contained the plywood and teak sandwich with no
way for water to drain away once it got in. It was very difficult to keep rust-free.
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Old 08-03-2020, 08:09 AM   #9052
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I watch a friend of mine with a 36ft. steel sailboat battle rust. All the deck fittings are SS welded to the mild steel hull. The rust seems to start in those areas and quickly spread. He is constantly grinding away rust. He uses epoxy primer for steel boats along with poly primer and top coat. This year he hauled out and is doing an extensive hull restoration. He has had to grind away so must rust over the year and a half he's owned the boat that the hull is getting to thin in areas. Surprisingly, he isn't getting rust inside the hull. It's my understanding that condensation is the killer of steel boats as they rust from the inside out. He has a special case, I think. One of those one in a million anomalies.
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Old 08-03-2020, 09:00 AM   #9053
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I watch a friend of mine with a 36ft. steel sailboat battle rust. All the deck fittings are SS welded to the mild steel hull. The rust seems to start in those areas and quickly spread. He is constantly grinding away rust. He uses epoxy primer for steel boats along with poly primer and top coat. This year he hauled out and is doing an extensive hull restoration. He has had to grind away so must rust over the year and a half he's owned the boat that the hull is getting to thin in areas. Surprisingly, he isn't getting rust inside the hull. It's my understanding that condensation is the killer of steel boats as they rust from the inside out. He has a special case, I think. One of those one in a million anomalies.
I find it interesting that the concept of interior deterioration keeps appearing on TF. I spent my career working on steel boats. In my experience It's the outside that is the main concern. Other areas are windows and if a traditional stuffing box that is supposed to drip then under the stuffing box. Interior surfaces unless a spot where water pools may see a patina of rust but not significant deterioration.

If your friend is grinding his hull away he is using the wrong approach. trying to take all the rust down to shiny metal. Paint can't adhere to a shiny slick surface, it needs a textured surface for the paint to 'grip'. Sand blasting is the perfect texture. A needle gun is a better tool than a grinder and leaves a better surface for painting.

And he needs to reconsider the paints he's using. Talk to a yard that paints steel workboats and see what primer they are using. A decent paint job should go 5 - 10 yrs with minor touch up hear and there except where abraded.

Where the stainless is welded to the mild steel may be a special problem where the different metals meet. Mild, stainless and the welding rod. If that can't be brought under control using the correct tools and primer then I'd change my boat's appearance a bit. A chip brush's width of simpler to maintain coating. When the rust appears, a light attack with a needle gun, a product like coroseal then top coat.

In my opinion the key to happiness with a steel boat unless you have unbelievably deep pockets it to learn to appreciate a workboat finish. I don't mean embrace the rust. Trying to keep a steel boat looking like a fiberglass boat just popped out of the mold will be an endless expense.
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Old 08-03-2020, 09:23 AM   #9054
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While it is out of the water, identify the thin spots and weld a path over them, after proper preparation.
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Old 08-14-2020, 10:01 AM   #9055
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New Pacific

New Pacific Camas Wa. Work boat conversions always catch my eye. A quick search turned up a couple of interesting articles on her state of the art electrical system. Here 1150 AMP hour battery bank is charged in 1 1/2 hours.

New Pacific - Revision Marine
Pacific Powerhouse - Passagemaker
Attached Thumbnails
New Pacific stbd bow.jpg   New Pacific port side.jpg  
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Old 08-14-2020, 12:17 PM   #9056
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New Pacific Camas Wa.
Work boat conversions always catch my eye.
Thanks for posting this. The boat is really eye-catching. Both articles were really interesting and then I found two or three more links (about other boats or people) to open in yet more tabs
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Old 08-14-2020, 12:29 PM   #9057
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[QUOTE=Portage_Bay;911864]New Pacific Camas Wa. Work boat conversions always catch my eye. A quick search turned up a couple of interesting articles on her state of the art electrical system. Here 1150 AMP hour battery bank is charged in 1 1/2 hours.

Not doing it with a 50 amp shore cable...
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Old 08-14-2020, 12:37 PM   #9058
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Now thatís what I call headroom!
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Old 08-14-2020, 01:09 PM   #9059
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Here 1150 AMP hour battery bank is charged in 1 1/2 hours.
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Not doing it with a 50 amp shore cable...
If I understood correctly, they do it with their generator, running it at it's best (most efficient) point. The charging can thus be done quickly (they were having issues prior to that with running generators for hours and hours on end, and not even at most efficient load point). That was the main goal of the project.
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Old 08-14-2020, 01:29 PM   #9060
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If you can tune an engine to run a genset at a specific load, you can optimize everything. I wonder about the heat put into the batteries, charging them that fast... And lithium iron phosphate chemistry batteries are rated low as far as energy density. They won't explode, and they last for years, but you have to have more batteries for the same output compared to Lithium Ion batteries.
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