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Old 12-04-2020, 05:19 PM   #101
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42' GB Classic

My GB 42' is a 1978 classic. I agree with most of the experienced comments on old boats. Even though mine is a fiberglass hull I have some teak decks and they require a lot of recurring maintenance to keep them looking good and remain watertight. More important: you can expect everything else that has not been replaced, to wear out just due to age and weather.
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Old 12-04-2020, 05:32 PM   #102
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Occurs to me this thread (or those like it) need some direction.

There are some boats that are worthy of restoration regardless if construction material. They are just simply classic designs or have a certain attribute that makes them worthy of restoration. Not economically, but certain boats that should not be lost to the proverbial wrecking ball. Old mahogany Chris Crafts come to mind.

There are also owners with a certain attachment to a boat that make irrational restoration decisions. They have reached a certain point in life where they can over improve simply to fulfill a dream.

And there are those with rose colored glasses who approach a project with what seem like reasonable expectations and only learn later they are in over their head. Worse, due to financial constraints, that happens very quickly.

None of the above is wood vs fiberglass, but I will note that going with wood is the Vegas equivalent of going from a $0.50 slot machine to a $5.00 slot machine. When you lose, you lose big and fast.

There are no good approaches, just variations of less-bad. Let's face it: owning a boat is second only to marrying the wrong spouse in the pantheon of bad financial decisions.

When Paul Djorka, billionaire owner of Patron Tequila wanted a super yacht, he didn't go for the 350 ft Vegas condo look. He wanted something he could captain himself and had a sense of nostalgia. He restored the last mahogany Chris Craft 57 Connie, likely at a cost of well over $1m. I respect that.

https://robbreport.com/motors/marine...-stars-230038/

Peter
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Old 12-04-2020, 05:52 PM   #103
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So if the reports are true that the the OP bought the boat, then he MUST start a new thread to tell us how it all goes. I'm sure even the nay-sayers (myself included) wish you the best of success, and would love to follow progress.
Ditto!! OP - please keep us apprised and best luck ever!!
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Old 12-04-2020, 06:49 PM   #104
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Interesting thread...

Always fun to read the comments from guys who like to present subtle put-downs, like "tupperware", or "plastic" boat. Just like the self-righteous sailboaters who refer to all of us as "stinkpotters", etc. Ridiculous, in other words...
..

What do think the " P" in FRP stands for?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibr...forced_plastic
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Old 12-04-2020, 07:20 PM   #105
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He bought it. We're now friends on Facebook. I'm glad he listened to US,not the "nay-sayers" that have nothing good to say about woodies.
I'm still thinking we should have our own Grand Banks Woodies forum.
What think you all ?

Ya you should have one! You can post pictures of you both working on all your 'projects' along with your invoices to west marine and other boat yards for us to admire..
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Old 12-04-2020, 07:26 PM   #106
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What do think the " P" in FRP stands for?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibr...forced_plastic



Polymer...
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Old 12-04-2020, 07:58 PM   #107
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Originally Posted by mvweebles View Post
Occurs to me this thread (or those like it) need some direction.

There are some boats that are worthy of restoration regardless if construction material. They are just simply classic designs or have a certain attribute that makes them worthy of restoration. Not economically, but certain boats that should not be lost to the proverbial wrecking ball. Old mahogany Chris Crafts come to mind.

There are also owners with a certain attachment to a boat that make irrational restoration decisions. They have reached a certain point in life where they can over improve simply to fulfill a dream.

And there are those with rose colored glasses who approach a project with what seem like reasonable expectations and only learn later they are in over their head. Worse, due to financial constraints, that happens very quickly.

None of the above is wood vs fiberglass, but I will note that going with wood is the Vegas equivalent of going from a $0.50 slot machine to a $5.00 slot machine. When you lose, you lose big and fast.

There are no good approaches, just variations of less-bad. Let's face it: owning a boat is second only to marrying the wrong spouse in the pantheon of bad financial decisions.

When Paul Djorka, billionaire owner of Patron Tequila wanted a super yacht, he didn't go for the 350 ft Vegas condo look. He wanted something he could captain himself and had a sense of nostalgia. He restored the last mahogany Chris Craft 57 Connie, likely at a cost of well over $1m. I respect that.

https://robbreport.com/motors/marine...-stars-230038/

Peter
Interesting. I would've speculated that old Chris Craft's were made for the wrecking ball. Talk about mass production...

Grew up around a marina that had a "mahogany row". Owens and Chris Crafts galore. Even as a kid I thought "meh". Same with a 55-57 Chevy (Exception maybe for the Nomad). Horses for courses, I guess.

This is from a guy that has every Woodenboat magazine, and calendar, and small craft.
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Old 12-04-2020, 07:59 PM   #108
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Polymer...
One of the Herreshoff boys nailed it with "frozen snot".
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Old 12-04-2020, 09:02 PM   #109
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One of the Herreshoff boys nailed it with "frozen snot".

Steel boat is "super-frozen snot"... that too soon rusts and flakes.

Aluminum boat is "frozen lightweight snot"... that loves to corrode and dislikes paint.

Wood boat is "mulch-food"... wanting to be eaten by bugs and rot.

Fiberglass boat [i.e. polymer based plastic] is "a product mixture that lasts"... with reduced material deterioration rate and fewer maintenance requirements.

You make the call - I did!!
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Old 12-04-2020, 09:24 PM   #110
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The Wonderful 32

Two years ago I sold my 1972 woodie which I loved and owned for 24 years. Now have a 1988 GB42. I still love the 32. Itís not a big deal to pull the tranny for new seals and pressure plate. New tanks a bigger project that may cost the value of the boat unless you do it yourself. I had the house and top sides painted along with teak trim varnished. Three coats on the house, two on topsides. Did the rails myself every year. Paint job was $21,000 and looked wonderful $60.00 labor by an independent painter.
Some soft wood along the fly bridge side bottoms. Pieced in and glassed new wood, epoxy filled and painted. Looked great. If I were to do again I would remove the entire side panel on both sides, seal, prime and paint. look for soft wood on fly bridge seat supports. Rebuilt one side. They need ventilation. Also soft wood along aft cockpit sides at the deck. Removed and replaced sides of cockpit. Look for soft wood under cockpit decking along sides and forward along main bulkhead.
May need a new muffler depending on whatís been done. Also water pump may need new gear type rather than slotted shaft. Install an overflow tank for coolant if it doesnít have one. American Diesel has both new style pump and tank conversion kit.
Pulled several screw at my selling survey and all bright and solid. Slightly pink around forward thru hull for head.
Never had any leaks in hull or soft wood.
Change all lighting to Led. Refinish teak floor after sanding old stuff off with orbital sander. As mentioned remove all half round around house and rebed with sikaflex. Removing window frames a chore depending on whatís been done by PO. Had one bedded with 2100 and destroyed about everything getting it off. Had to have new teak frame mad. Screw heads holding frames typically on inside of boat but some of mine had been screwed from the outside and plugged. Investigate motor mounts. May need replacing.
Replaced electrical panel and breakers. Installed macerating head and a second holding tank with separate macerating pump for discharge.
You will love this boat. Take your time and enjoy it.
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Old 12-04-2020, 09:46 PM   #111
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Go for it, lifes short

The beauty of a woodie is that most of the work can be performed by an average Joe with some pretty rudimentary tools. There is nothing that cannot be repaired and or replaced and sure, there are crappy jobs that may need doing, but the satisfaction of completing a job is the real payday. I'm looking at another woodie now, going to the dark side and considering a classic sailboat, mahogany and oak, a beauty and while reasonably tight and trim, she'll surely consume many hours of time but I like woodworking, built cabinets in my youth, nice cabinets in a good shop so it's a win-win. Pride in ownership extends far beyond the checkbook and the gleaming plastic boat that, while practical, will not speak to your soul the way a woodie will. If you go into this with eyes wide open and she passes a rigorous survey without too many issues, run with it, not from it, you'll learn a lot and also swell with pride when people comment on what a beautiful classic you have.
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Old 12-04-2020, 10:08 PM   #112
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The beauty of a woodie ... the satisfaction of completing a job is the real payday. ... you'll learn a lot and also swell with pride when people comment on what a beautiful classic you have.
Open up the chocolate box. Some like cabinet making and some like boating.
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Old 12-04-2020, 10:10 PM   #113
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Open up the chocolate box. Some like cabinet making and some like boating.


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Old 12-04-2020, 10:15 PM   #114
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Well Forest, for many, the ability to create and enjoy has been lost or perhaps never existed. I have the luxury of several boats at hand and should I choose to take on a classic beauty to while away my time when not cruising, I'd hardly call it folly. Incidentally, when I pass my craftmanship still admired today in museums and several churches, it goes far beyond cabinet making.
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Old 12-04-2020, 10:36 PM   #115
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Sometimes you gotta chase a rabbit down a hole, all the way. To see what it`s really like. Let`s hope it`s a good rabbit, and there`s no bunny.
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Old 12-04-2020, 10:49 PM   #116
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If everyone followed the most practical and well advised course through life, this planet would be boring as heck.
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Old 12-04-2020, 11:00 PM   #117
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What is with the aversion to oneself working on their own boat in this thread?

Discussion about tens or hundred of thousands of dollars changing hands to make something "right".

Do none of you have calloused hands? Or have none of you experienced the joy of making something "good" again?

I may not know the difference between a cravat and an ascot, but I can cut and set a bung.

If one man can build it, another man can repair it.

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Old 12-04-2020, 11:09 PM   #118
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Originally Posted by Tim View Post
Two years ago I sold my 1972 woodie which I loved and owned for 24 years. Now have a 1988 GB42. I still love the 32. Itís not a big deal to pull the tranny for new seals and pressure plate. New tanks a bigger project that may cost the value of the boat unless you do it yourself. I had the house and top sides painted along with teak trim varnished. Three coats on the house, two on topsides. Did the rails myself every year. Paint job was $21,000 and looked wonderful $60.00 labor by an independent painter.
Some soft wood along the fly bridge side bottoms. Pieced in and glassed new wood, epoxy filled and painted. Looked great. If I were to do again I would remove the entire side panel on both sides, seal, prime and paint. look for soft wood on fly bridge seat supports. Rebuilt one side. They need ventilation. Also soft wood along aft cockpit sides at the deck. Removed and replaced sides of cockpit. Look for soft wood under cockpit decking along sides and forward along main bulkhead.
May need a new muffler depending on whatís been done. Also water pump may need new gear type rather than slotted shaft. Install an overflow tank for coolant if it doesnít have one. American Diesel has both new style pump and tank conversion kit.
Pulled several screw at my selling survey and all bright and solid. Slightly pink around forward thru hull for head.
Never had any leaks in hull or soft wood.
Change all lighting to Led. Refinish teak floor after sanding old stuff off with orbital sander. As mentioned remove all half round around house and rebed with sikaflex. Removing window frames a chore depending on whatís been done by PO. Had one bedded with 2100 and destroyed about everything getting it off. Had to have new teak frame mad. Screw heads holding frames typically on inside of boat but some of mine had been screwed from the outside and plugged. Investigate motor mounts. May need replacing.
Replaced electrical panel and breakers. Installed macerating head and a second holding tank with separate macerating pump for discharge.
You will love this boat. Take your time and enjoy it.
Amazing info @Tim. Thank you very much!

Re the window frames, can you provide more info here. There is one window above the sink thats cracked and all the tracks need to be cleaned and new felt added. The surveyor also thought rebeding the portlights would be good, but not an urgent task. Do you have any info on how to get those out and does the trim all need to be remilled?

And yes, replacing the half round around the house would be the first project on the list. Thats worn and some crappy caulk jobs done in places. Any tips there appreciated.
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Old 12-04-2020, 11:34 PM   #119
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And thanks for the continued feedback all!

The survey went surprisingly well. I had the yard on standby to cancel the haul out and the surveyor came in expecting the worst after my description. However....while the boat looks like shit its in shockingly good structural and mechanical condition.

The surveyor found no rot, planking, frames and butt blocks all in very good shape, bilge is dry, shaft log good, batteries and electrical good, flybridge was replaced 10 years ago and has no rot, $10k rebuilt Ford Lehman installed 5 years ago and is strong, new engine mounts last year, survey was done 2 years ago for insurance and all items identified were rectified, and the hull is in fantastic shape (but needs a new bottom job). Pulled 6 fasteners and couldn't get any to budge, which they felt was a great sign. All looked new and appeared some had already been replaced in the past.

The amazing thing is the project manager at KKMI has known and worked on the boat for 30 years. He thought it was a great boat and knew the current owner used the shit out of it (which is why he felt it was in such good structural and mechanical condition). He was sad to see the owner had to sell it and let it go cosmetically. They also provided me 10 years of service records.

The bad parts were already known: transmission leak, bad port tank and identified a leak in the hose fitting on the "good" starboard tank, surface corrosion on the transmission and rudder quadrant, need to replace/rebed the deck/house half round, sand, scrape paint or varnish every inch of the boat...basically everywhere you look is a project.

One of the worst parts was we found somebody has used bronze nails to fasten sections of the aft teak deck. That had everyone scratching their heads. After some deliberation everyone felt it should be left as is. The teak wasnt leaking, the caulking was good, so they felt the best course was to leave it be. Trying to remove would cause a lot more damage. So the recommendation is just to clean, bleach and treat with semco every 6 months.

We also found the tanks had already been replaced sometime 10+ years ago. While the port tank didnt last, the good part of the bad part is there is at least 1ft of clearance above them so its looking like they can be slid straight back out of the aft lazaret and replaced with plastic tanks. But thats looking like a project for a few years from now.

Next step is engine survey and insurance quotes on monday.

So not there yet, but a good step. I was also very impressed with the surveyor, broker and project manager at KKMI. They were all wood boat owners and were happy to share their knowledge and passion. Thats a big plus when taking on a project like this.


So I think we will have a final decision next week. And if I do purchase, yes I will certainly create a new thread on the projects and progress. Some of you might enjoy a couple "I told you so's" along the way . But I appreciate the support all the same.
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Old 12-04-2020, 11:43 PM   #120
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What is with the aversion to oneself working on their own boat in this thread?

Discussion about tens or hundred of thousands of dollars changing hands to make something "right".

Do none of you have calloused hands? Or have none of you experienced the joy of making something "good" again?

I may not know the difference between a cravat and an ascot, but I can cut and set a bung.

If one man can build it, another man can repair it.

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Those that can do
Those that can't say run away.
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