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Old 08-15-2022, 10:06 AM   #1
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GB 42 Classic, ~1999

hi all, looking at a GB 42 Classic, ~1999. Boat is seemingly well maintained, but curious any known issues to look out for. Teak decks, assuming screwed down versus glued, so already thinking about deck core and fuel tank issues. Anything else to comes to mind?
my thanks in advance.
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Old 08-15-2022, 02:53 PM   #2
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Which engines? I looked for a friend of a friend at a similar size GB but don't remember the year. I believe the engines were GMs but only available for maybe one year. No significant parts were available, period. Ok boat otherwise, but if you had a major problem, repower time. Make sure of availability for engine, transmission, and generator parts.

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Old 08-15-2022, 05:46 PM   #3
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Window leaks are common, and if left unattended the water intrusion can cause rot in the deckhouse walls.

Not sure what vintage you mean by "~1999," but it was common for GB's in the '90s to come with Caterpillar 3208 TAs - a suboptimal choice, IMO, for two reasons. The turbos and aftercoolers require periodic and rather costly service, and the extra width of twin 3208s with all the turbocharging and aftercooling hardware tacked on requires a lot of space in the engine compartment. Too much for comfort, especially if you intend to do your own maintenance.
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Old 08-15-2022, 06:24 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blissboat View Post
Window leaks are common, and if left unattended the water intrusion can cause rot in the deckhouse walls.

Not sure what vintage you mean by "~1999," but it was common for GB's in the '90s to come with Caterpillar 3208 TAs - a suboptimal choice, IMO, for two reasons. The turbos and aftercoolers require periodic and rather costly service, and the extra width of twin 3208s with all the turbocharging and aftercooling hardware tacked on requires a lot of space in the engine compartment. Too much for comfort, especially if you intend to do your own maintenance.
And if you are paying someone to do the work poor access means more dollars.
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Old 08-15-2022, 08:38 PM   #5
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Hulls are typically bullet proof. Condition of teak decks, railing and window frames are important. You'll spend lots of time and/or money if these have been neglected. Diesel tank installation / corrosion were improved by 1999 but still good to check tanks for leaks both top and bottom.
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Old 08-18-2022, 09:13 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blissboat View Post
The turbos and aftercoolers require periodic and rather costly service, and the extra width of twin 3208s with all the turbocharging and aftercooling hardware tacked on requires a lot of space in the engine compartment. Too much for comfort, especially if you intend to do your own maintenance.

The 3208 TA's in my 92, 46Cl have the after-cooler and turbo mounted on top of and behind, respectively, the engines. Their width is from the exhaust manifolds on each side of these smooth running V8s. Access is relatively good. Sitting on the battery boxes, outboard of both. I was able to descale and paint both engines without too much effort. The 42 has about a foot less beam, and I've never been in the ER of one, so can't comment about access.

I removed both the ACs and the turbos myself. Had the turbos professionally rebuilt (2k ea) and cleaned and pressure tested the coolers myself.

It's not rocket surgery. The turbos are heavy, (but they come apart into manageable pieces)


Fuel burn at 8kts. and 1500 rpm is about 7gph total.


If they had cylinder liners.


IMO 3208's.
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