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-   -   Trash handling aboard (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s30/trash-handling-aboard-61927.html)

BandB 01-19-2022 04:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by O C Diver (Post 1069962)
Laziness.

Ted

That was all I could think of, so I was hoping someone would have a better explanation.

Comodave 01-19-2022 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 1069960)
I return to the OP and others talking about throwing trash in the ocean and ask, "What is the problem you're having and trying to address?" Are you cruising months without going near shore? Is it cans, cardboard, glass? The example used of wine bottles just seems so obvious to me, that you rinse it and put it right back where you got it. If you don't go anywhere for more wine, then the space is available. If you go for more, then that's where you dispose of the bottle.

I just don't grasp the burden that is forcing people to dump in the ocean. Perhaps those who spend months at sea and far from any land, but I don't know many of those active here and the ones I do know are not the ones indicating a problem.

I choose not to litter but it's not just because of laws against littering. I've never been in a situation in which it was necessary. Even if it's cans, crush them and you have less than you brought with you. Even cardboard, less than at the start. Only thing we put in the water is food. So will someone please explain the need and desire to me.

Thanks.


Absolutely. We do not throw anything in the water. It all adds up.

Sealife 01-19-2022 05:52 PM

Don't want to become a "target"....but biggest difference is in international vs. domestic travel. Domestic, no excuses, but international (Central America, Caribbean) can be difficult. Several times where there was a trash receptacle, it was overflowing. So trash gets washed to sea/beach etc. Other times, a local will take it for a $1 or 2 rhan ditch it in mangrove etc. So sometimes you sink what you can (in very deep water), burn what you can, and minimize your footprint as muxh as possible.

Shrew 01-19-2022 06:01 PM

Glass isn't really littering. It sits on the bottom and slowly turns back into sand. The reason the bottoms are cut out is the shape makes them have a tendency to float. If/when water partially fills the body, it goes to the bottom and tips the neck up and can float around for a long time like that. Plus the sharp edges tend to promote the breakdown faster than the thick, rounded mouth and smooth sides.

Think about how you find seaglass

BandB 01-19-2022 06:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sealife (Post 1069990)
Don't want to become a "target"....but biggest difference is in international vs. domestic travel. Domestic, no excuses, but international (Central America, Caribbean) can be difficult. Several times where there was a trash receptacle, it was overflowing. So trash gets washed to sea/beach etc. Other times, a local will take it for a $1 or 2 rhan ditch it in mangrove etc. So sometimes you sink what you can (in very deep water), burn what you can, and minimize your footprint as muxh as possible.

We've done lots of international cruising and were always able to find ways to handle our trash. Yes, sometimes receptacles overflowing, but same problem domestically. Had only a couple of times we had to wait for the next stop. Admittedly, we don't always know what the international marina will end up doing with our trash.

Do appreciate your response.

JWellington 01-19-2022 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 1069960)
I return to the OP and others talking about throwing trash in the ocean and ask, "What is the problem you're having and trying to address?" Are you cruising months without going near shore? Is it cans, cardboard, glass? The example used of wine bottles just seems so obvious to me, that you rinse it and put it right back where you got it. If you don't go anywhere for more wine, then the space is available. If you go for more, then that's where you dispose of the bottle.

I just don't grasp the burden that is forcing people to dump in the ocean. Perhaps those who spend months at sea and far from any land, but I don't know many of those active here and the ones I do know are not the ones indicating a problem.

I choose not to litter but it's not just because of laws against littering. I've never been in a situation in which it was necessary. Even if it's cans, crush them and you have less than you brought with you. Even cardboard, less than at the start. Only thing we put in the water is food. So will someone please explain the need and desire to me.

Thanks.

No problem if you want to carry garbage around with you for weeks on end. Most dont. Nobody even suggested anybody was 'forcing' them to.

JWellington 01-19-2022 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 1069997)
We've done lots of international cruising and were always able to find ways to handle our trash. Yes, sometimes receptacles overflowing, but same problem domestically. Had only a couple of times we had to wait for the next stop. Admittedly, we don't always know what the international marina will end up doing with our trash.

Do appreciate your response.

In landfill or sea, not much difference for stuff like wine bottles, tin cans, etc.

JWellington 01-19-2022 07:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alaskan Sea-Duction (Post 1069945)
Reminds me of the central Pacific with miles and miles of trash floating on top. Sad

Not me, I dont remember ANY.

rslifkin 01-19-2022 07:30 PM

The only thing that makes sense to me to dump is biodegradeable food waste. If you'd be keeping it on board for more than a few days to a week otherwise, it'll get gross and stinky. And it's got minimal impact to dump, provided it's not in overly large pieces (I think regs require maceration to 1" or smaller) and not a massive quantity all at once.



Everything else can stay on board. As others pointed out, if there was space for it before use, there's space for it after.

JWellington 01-19-2022 07:35 PM

"Most normally, yachts will follow a similar strategy as other sea faring vessels, in that they release waste straightforwardly into the seas. Many the advanced vessels have holding tanks for human waste (dark water), yet wastewater (dim water) is generally emptied into the actual sea."

JWellington 01-19-2022 07:39 PM

"Under federal law, it is illegal to toss ANY garbage from a boat while you are anywhere in lakes, rivers, bays, sounds, and offshore in the ocean less than 3 miles."

psneeld 01-19-2022 07:41 PM

In my language and opinion...garbage is different than trash.

I believe MARPOL.. addresses this somewhat.

Garbage will generally cause a health hazard if not attended to well if kept onboard....trash to a much lesser degree.

JWellington 01-19-2022 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psneeld (Post 1070031)
In my language and opinion...garbage is different than trash.

I believe MARPOL.. addresses this somewhat.

Garbage will generally cause a health hazard if not attended to well if kept onboard....trash to a much lesser degree.

For most people garbage and trash are synonyms.

psneeld 01-19-2022 07:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JWellington (Post 1070034)
For most people garbage and trash are synonyms.

That is your opinion...the way landlubbers see it....but mine is because I hang around mariners who know/get the difference between organic and not.

JWellington 01-19-2022 07:58 PM

"Ships operating close to the USA can’t discharge untreated sewage inside the 3 mile limit. Once outside that, they can, except for the waters surrounding Alaska. There is a higher standard for those areas."

JWellington 01-19-2022 08:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psneeld (Post 1070037)
That is your opinion...the way landlubbers see it....but mine is because I hang around mariners who know/get the difference between organic and not.

We did too, the organic..the cat that died.....the non organic, all the wine bottles, buried at sea.

Alaskan Sea-Duction 01-19-2022 08:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JWellington (Post 1070043)
"Ships operating close to the USA canít discharge untreated sewage inside the 3 mile limit. Once outside that, they can, except for the waters surrounding Alaska. There is a higher standard for those areas."

Higher standards for Alaska? Unless you are talking cruise ships.

JWellington 01-19-2022 08:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alaskan Sea-Duction (Post 1070049)
Higher standards for Alaska? Unless you are talking cruise ships.

I keep reading how many just dump at night.

O C Diver 01-19-2022 08:35 PM

This thread reminds me of stopping for a few days at Beaver Island in Lake Michigan. The interior of the island is a junkyard. Everything on the island arrives by ferry. So when something is worn out, you discard it on your property for free or pay the ferry cost to have it removed. Obviously biodegradable stuff isn't a problem, but there are hundreds of cars and trucks littering a great number of the properties. Add refrigerators, washers, dryers, and just about anything people or businesses have that goes bad.

I don't give 3rd world countries a blanket pass, but there's just no excuse in 1st world countries. If you're ok with dropping garbage in the ocean while out cruising for a week, would you be ok with somebody dropping the same garbage in your yard? Do you think you're some how better because your garbage isn't littering your yard?

Ted

JWellington 01-19-2022 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by O C Diver (Post 1070058)
This thread reminds me of stopping for a few days at Beaver Island in Lake Michigan. The interior of the island is a junkyard. Everything on the island arrives by ferry. So when something is worn out, you discard it on your property for free or pay the ferry cost to have it removed. Obviously biodegradable stuff isn't a problem, but there are hundreds of cars and trucks littering a great number of the properties. Add refrigerators, washers, dryers, and just about anything people or businesses have that goes bad.

I don't give 3rd world countries a blanket pass, but there's just no excuse in 1st world countries. If you're ok with dropping garbage in the ocean while out cruising for a week, would you be ok with somebody dropping the same garbage in your yard? Do you think you're some how better because your garbage isn't littering your yard?

Ted

Who said they were ok with dumping on a one week cruise? Tell me his name and ill have harsh words with him!


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