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Mule 09-07-2014 01:11 PM

Water Supply
 
Do you fill your water tanks at the marina when slipped, and again and again or do you hook up a hose to the boat. :confused:

RT Firefly 09-07-2014 01:13 PM

Greetings,
Mr. M. Hose. Disconnected if away for more than a day.

siestakey 09-07-2014 01:22 PM

Hose at the dock

disconnect when I leave overnight

when at dock presure pump is off also

psneeld 09-07-2014 03:03 PM

liveaboard and use city water...just turn it off if leaving fo more than an hour or so. (have a ball valve in-line so it's a flick of the foot)

Have a little tag that we put on the lock when we leave saying the water is off to remind us to turn it back on before we get comfortable.

Mule 09-07-2014 03:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psneeld (Post 265354)
liveaboard and use city water...just turn it off if leaving fo more than an hour or so. (have a ball valve in-line so it's a flick of the foot)

Have a little tag that we put on the lock when we leave saying the water is off to remind us to turn it back on before we get comfortable.

I like Da way u think,










Sometimes:angel:

HiDHo 09-07-2014 03:24 PM

We fill and use the boat potable water pump for two reasons. One we have 300 gallons of capacity and two the dock water pressure is 100 psi.
Bill

caltexflanc 09-07-2014 03:58 PM

Both, here. We like to cycle the water in the tanks every so often if we are going to be at the dock any length of time. You can put a pressure regulator/limiter in-line if your boat or the dock doesn't already have one. Under 10 bucks or about 15 with a little gauge built in.

Amazon.com: hose pressure reducer

ranger58sb 09-08-2014 07:53 AM

Usually: fill, with 25/1 micron and .5 micron filters in line. Mostly to cause frequent cycling of fresh water in our tanks, partly because the connection and subsequent hose routing at our home slip would create a bit of a trip hazard unless I did some fancy routing.

Occasionally, as at a transient facility: dock water, usually with only the 25/1 micron filter in line.

-Chris

hmason 09-08-2014 09:01 AM

We use the tanks. I can't trust myself to remember to turn off the dockside connection every time I leave the boat or go to sleep for the night or take an afternoon snooze. A broken hose or loose hose clamp can sink your boat pretty quick with dockside water. Ain't worth the risk IMHO.

rwidman 09-08-2014 09:06 AM

I fill the tanks and refill when needed or before leaving a marina. There is no city water inlet on my boat.

It's not that adding one is beyond my skills, it is not. I just don't think it's safe to have the city water connected, especially if we are not on the boat or are sleeping. If a pipe breaks or leaks in your home, there may be water damage but it won't sink. On a boat, it will sink.

Mule 09-08-2014 09:16 AM

RW, I have a Mainship I lived aboard and fed it off the hose. Had a turn off but no high water alarm. I think I was 'dancin with the devil. I just reworked my bilge pumps on the Present, 5500 GPH theroical pumping capacity, adding a VERY big alarm bell for high water and with 150 gallon water I am ok with on board. I am going to lay back a new, spare fresh water pump though.

rwidman 09-08-2014 09:32 AM

If I have a leak (I did once, a hose came off the fitting), the worst that can happen is that sixty gallons of water will be in a different place (the bilge) on my boat. Some of it will be pumped out of course. Using and then refilling the tanks hasn't proven to be an inconvenience.

MurrayM 09-08-2014 09:34 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Seem to remember a device for automatically shutting off the city water supply to prevent flooding in summer cabins or periodically used apartments...it had a programmable amount it would allow through at one time, then would shut off the water. Might be useful on a boat.

Living where we do, on BC's north coast, fresh drinking water is usually just a short dinghy ride away so we never worry about running out :)

psneeld 09-08-2014 09:48 AM

If you even have one small working bilge pump...it takes awhile to even get a reasonable amount in a 36-40 foot typical trawler to cover anything (many things actually can use a fresh water rinse every once and awhile).

I had a series of splits and leaks in my hot water hose for the 1st 2 years owning the boat...finally figured out about the quality of the hose and the way the PO had it clamped together.

With a high water alarm for when sleeping...I just don't see it as a major issue after 10 years of living aboard 3 different boats.

Having the fresh water pump on will still cause leaks in the vast majority of the system so water damage is possible unless you turn the pump off every time you are done with a fixture (even then residual pressure will result is some water damage).

Forgetting to turn off the water and walking away for the week is a different story.

I have used the water meters that can be set for a total number of gallons allowed...unfortunately the ones I had were plastic and if you forgot to take them off the hose and drain them during an overnight freeze....oooopps...plus it's as easy to remember turning of the water with a "tag" system as it is to remember to reset the meter.

Mule 09-08-2014 09:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MurrayM (Post 265593)
Seem to remember a device for automatically shutting off the city water supply to prevent flooding in summer cabins or periodically used apartments...it had a programmable amount it would allow through at one time, then would shut off the water. Might be useful on a boat.

Living where we do, on BC's north coast, fresh drinking water is usually just a short dinghy ride away so we never worry about running out :)

What about the moose, elk, weasels, bears, skunks and so forth up stream.....I love, just love BC, did a bare (bear) boat charter in Puget Sound.

Ghostrider42 09-08-2014 10:20 AM

Don't have that problem we make 100L/hr

sunchaser 09-08-2014 10:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mule (Post 265604)
What about the moose, elk, weasels, bears, skunks and so forth up stream.....I love, just love BC, did a bare (bear) boat charter in Puget Sound.

Hey Murray, BC is now in Puget Sound. Eh?

Bay Pelican 09-08-2014 10:44 AM

We do both depending upon whether we want to use up older water in the tanks. However, we attach a water meter to the shore water inlet when we are operating on shore water. Meter will only allow 200/300 gallons depending on setting before it shuts itself off. A safety concern if a hose breaks.

caltexflanc 09-08-2014 10:57 AM

While we have a habit of turning the dock water off when away, we are not always religious about it, especially if just gone for the day. I sometime muse about this paranoia. It can and should be mitigated by inspecting and maintaining your plumbing on a regular basis. Having a high water alarm in all bilge compartments that is quite audible outside the boat. Having adequate bilge pumps and back ups.

I see so many people who are freaked by this, yet leave their shore power plugged in and on when away.

bayview 09-08-2014 11:50 AM

The water flow limiters sold in the garden department of stores seems a decent, cheap security measure. They are not perfect and need to be reset before you jump in the shower. [:D]


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