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Old 02-22-2020, 02:53 AM   #21
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Besides all the solids from combustion and additives in the oil, there can be corrosive acids that accumulate in the oil over time. That is the culprit in the discussion about whether to change oil before putting an engine into storage or after it comes out of storage. I think the majority would say change before storage to get those corrosive compounds out before sitting for a period of time. Sulphur in the fuel will combine with condensed water and form a mild acid which can go to work on close tolerance fuel injection components and damage them. Maybe this is not a big problem since Lepke is just centrifugeing his oil to clean the particles out but wouldn’t do anything for liquids ???

I wouldn’t burn used engine oil in any new high pressure common rail system for sure and probably wouldn’t on any system.
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Old 02-22-2020, 06:54 AM   #22
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I worked for a company in the 90's that got involved with a company selling waste oil heaters. They were a fuel oil heater modified to burn waste oil. Company bought 15 or 20 heaters thinking they would be easy to sell to the trucking companies-lots based in the metro Atlanta area. Should have done their research because all the big trucking firms mixed their waste oil into truck fuel. Didn't sell more than 1 or two. Granted this was 25 years ago and have no idea if it is still the norm with the newer engines of today. Turns out the heaters were super high maintenance-hard to keep burner nozzle clean and the fuel pumps didn't last trying to pump dirty oil. Probably a good reason not to burn oil in a modern engine, wouldn't risk it on my old Lehman either. As far as I know they still have a stack of heaters in the back corner of the warehouse.
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Old 02-22-2020, 08:43 AM   #23
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rns out the heaters were super high maintenance-hard to keep burner nozzle clean and the fuel pumps didn't last trying to pump dirty oil.
My son has been heating his automotive repair shop for about 15 years with only waste oil.
He never had a nozzle or pump issue. The only problems were clogged pick up screens and of course filter changes.
He burns used motor oil, tranny fluid, brake fluid, etc. If you look at the chimney there is no visable smoke.
Waste oil heaters have come a long way.
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Old 02-22-2020, 09:48 AM   #24
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I was trying to figure out why someone would want to do this and had to go back to the first post. I guess it’s for convenience? I have 12v71 Detroits and change nearly 15 gallons every 100hrs and have never had a problem disposing of the oil and the 4 huge filters when traveling. Either a marina will take or I can get a lift to an Autozone or other parts seller who will take it. Sometimes I have to hold it for a week or so, but so what? Even here in the Exumas I can find a place to take it, if I want to pay a bit: $2 a gallon, the same price as for a single bag of trash in Georgetown Harbor. It’s in 5 gallon pails with caps so it’s not like it can’t sit in the cockpit or engine room indefinitely until I find a place to accept it.
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Old 02-22-2020, 07:09 PM   #25
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for eons i have been using a by-pass filter system that is called, "GULF COAST OIL FILTERS," they have one model that filters oil, and another for fuel...they also sell thier own filter replacemets. since mine were new, i have the purchased the 6" bounty paper towels at Costco, i think they filter down to abt 1, to 1.5 microns...been on our 40ft skookum built in port townsend, wa. for 30 yrs, between oil changes is about 300 to 350 hours, have sent samples in, and the oil is very clean! the name is derived from being produced on our southern gulf coast!
i have a 1992 dodge/cummins pickup, with a "frantz" toilet paper oil filter on the dodge since it was new, i change the toilet paper roll every 2500 miles, and the oil at abt 15,000+ miles! the first several times, i sent samples in, and there never was anything in the oil, no blowby, silicon/dirt, water, nada ever! have always used Scott 1000 toilet paper! the website to buy the frantz toilet paper filters, for oil/fuel, is "WE FILTER IT" they have kits, i would buy a gas or oil filters, and buy all the hose/fittings, etc, locally! have been using the Frantz since 1962! have had mechanics tell me that the newer engines are more sophfisicated, etc, so my answer is always, were only filtering the oil from the engine, then back to the engine, for fuel, from the fuel tank to the engine thru the smaller "pre-filters" my email is garbage7@wavecable.com. i also flush the volvo single and genset we have, with fresh water every time we park it in our boat house! i run fresh water thru to flush the salt water out! salt water helps cause corosion!...clyde
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Old 02-22-2020, 07:19 PM   #26
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it`s a little different than your question, my wife is from germany, in the cold winters, they added abt 10% gas to their diesel fuel...clyde
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Old 02-22-2020, 08:43 PM   #27
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Waste engine oil is useful for fueling oil-fired steam engines.

Would not think of adding it to the boat's diesel fuel.

Have no oil-disposal concerns since I let the boatyard/engine mechanic deal with it every year or so.
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Old 02-23-2020, 01:04 PM   #28
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i see, you don`t do your own work, you let someone else do it! waste oil also runs heaters in large shops, in some places used oil is used on dirt roads, to keep the dust down in the summer! when i was a kid, used oil was re-refined, and sold cheep in service stations ($0.25) a quart! as i said, in europe most add 10% gas to diesel in the winter! i rremember in warm states, like california, they sprayed used oil along side the roads to prevent the grass from growing!...clyde
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Old 02-23-2020, 02:19 PM   #29
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But I suppose it's an approach that could work for garbage disposal too? You could mix a little bit of your garbage in with your food, and might not notice it. Just think of the saved trips to the dump.[/QUOTE]

Good one.
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Old 02-23-2020, 03:15 PM   #30
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funny...i was involved in the family garbage business for approx 40 yrs! one thing, i commercial fished for 20 years, from the seattle area/san juans, to the kodiak area, always was out of bed by 02:30, during summer fishing season, after unloading our catch, cleaning up the boat, eating dinner, we usually got into our bunks about 10pm or later, so when i started to haul garbage, getting up early was`nt new! i never ate much more than a coupla pieces of toast before i left the house, cause it`s difficult to work/lift etc, this was before containers, so it was by hand lifting cans, which is difficult after eating much! i would haul commercials early, and start the residences about 0700! i remember the biggest resteurant had about 18 cans, and it was difficult to smell all the roasted beef/garlic bread, etc, i usually stopped to eat at a small place around 11am...
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Old 02-23-2020, 03:25 PM   #31
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that was very dry humor!
i rememer when hiring people, taking them out on a route, with a side, or rear loading truck, some, i think, thought the garbage jumped/flew into the truck by itself...clyde
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Old 02-23-2020, 04:15 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by clyde View Post
i see, you don`t do your own work, you let someone else do it! waste oil also runs heaters in large shops, in some places used oil is used on dirt roads, to keep the dust down in the summer! when i was a kid, used oil was re-refined, and sold cheep in service stations ($0.25) a quart! as i said, in europe most add 10% gas to diesel in the winter! i rremember in warm states, like california, they sprayed used oil along side the roads to prevent the grass from growing!...clyde
It has been decades since waste oil was sprayed on roads or weeds.
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Old 02-23-2020, 08:28 PM   #33
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There are no corrosives in oil until the TBN is reduced to the point of ineffectiveness. Oil analysis reveals the TBN. Lots of boat owners throw away perfectly good every fall out of misplaced fear. The TBN stays high for hundreds of hours. I have tested oil with 500 hours that was reported by the lab as still good to use. Soon, there will come along those who say they change the oil cuz it's cheap insurance. Remember when we all changed vehicle oil every 3,000 miles because the conventional wisdom dictated so? Manufacturers today do not recommend 3,000 mile change intervals. What makes boat engines any different?
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Besides all the solids from combustion and additives in the oil, there can be corrosive acids that accumulate in the oil over time. That is the culprit in the discussion about whether to change oil before putting an engine into storage or after it comes out of storage. I think the majority would say change before storage to get those corrosive compounds out before sitting for a period of time. Sulphur in the fuel will combine with condensed water and form a mild acid which can go to work on close tolerance fuel injection components and damage them. Maybe this is not a big problem since Lepke is just centrifugeing his oil to clean the particles out but wouldn’t do anything for liquids ???

I wouldn’t burn used engine oil in any new high pressure common rail system for sure and probably wouldn’t on any system.
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Old 02-24-2020, 07:05 AM   #34
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'Manufacturers today do not recommend 3,000 mile change intervals. What makes boat engines any different?'

My Sprinter 3500 has a factory 20,000 mile oil service interval on Mobile !.

Not yet on boats . Used on cars for30+ years.
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