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Old 10-22-2017, 08:47 AM   #21
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Love my twins!
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Old 10-22-2017, 10:55 AM   #22
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Single vs twin

I am the owner of a Grand Banks 36 with a single 120hp Ford Lehman. I have owned the boat for 20 years and I must admit that I enjoy the extra room to work on the engine. I generally run at 1700 rpms with a speed over ground of 7.3 knots using a four bladed prop. We use the boat extensively during the summer months putting on around 300 hours. My fuel burn on average is 1.9gph which includes the diesel heater and generator. One can never argue with redundancy. During our 20 years plus in Southeast Alaska we have been aboard other GBs of the same size with twins and found the holy place to be very vey tight making maintenance a difficult job.
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Old 10-23-2017, 10:17 AM   #23
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If single v twins is your only issue, you need to go aboard both kinds. Get down and dirty in the ER of both. Drive both. Dock both. Dock both in a cross wind and in a cross current.
I once helped a friend learn the ins and outs of his ER in a 36 GB with twins. There was lots of room for both of us in the ER at once. Lots of access to everything that was to eventually be serviced. Mind you, neither of us needed to go to weight watchers, but had that been the case, he wouldn't have been able to service a single in the same ER.
The added maneuverability of twins would be enough to convince me, but I recently had a full summer while my mechanic waited for me to return from my boating vacation, in order to repair one of my engines. I lost no time from doing what I love to do, cruising on my boat. If I only had the one, I would have lost a summer. That alone would also be enough to convince me to go with twins.
You will burn more fuel with twins. That is not due to any extra cost of spinning the extra iron, but will be due to your enjoyment of 8 to 8.5 knot cruising instead of 6 to 7 knot cruising. If you still want to go that slow, your fuel consumption will drop to that of the guys with singles. Try both speeds. See which one you like. 8 to 8.5 knots would again be enough to convince me to go with twins.
You mentioned "the advantages of a single over twins". I don't think you have considered the opposite. You owe it to yourself to consider twins. Then you can make your choice and join the camp that you will then be able to properly defend, from true knowledge, not just from religion.
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Old 10-23-2017, 02:15 PM   #24
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I could give you 600 good reasons not to buy a twin engine boat. Looking for the right single made our search a lot longer than it would have been. It's too long a story why we bought twin screw "Gypsy Star". I still believe every one of those 600 reasons but... I could never go back to single screw. Handling this boat is just too damn much fun.
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Old 10-24-2017, 09:19 AM   #25
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No specific comment about the GB but before deciding check out engine room access to both sides of the single and twin engines. You may decide better access to the single outweighs other considerations (or you may not!).
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Old 10-24-2017, 11:20 AM   #26
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Keith wrote;
“If single v twins is your only issue, you need to go aboard both kinds. Get down and dirty in the ER of both. Drive both. Dock both. Dock both in a cross wind and in a cross current.”

One may learn something about the GB by running into headwind w a steep 2 or 3’ chop. There may not be much difference but the heavier twin may take a lot more water on the wheelhouse windows. I wonder if anyone has some apples to apples experience to apply to this question.
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Old 10-24-2017, 12:26 PM   #27
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If one's rudder and single-propeller are protected by a keel, one can avoid lots of problems. Just ask my two-propeller friends. (If you know me, you know them.)
^^ What he said

LOVE my single fully protected prop on my tug!

...and before you say it; yes i know i'm due for bottom paint


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Old 11-16-2017, 07:43 PM   #28
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Like my Single

I purchased a '77 Grand Banks 36 with a single John Deere. I liked the idea of less maintenance but was afraid of reduced maneuverability. As a few others have commented - I cannot imagine how hard it would be to work on anything in the engine compartment with twins. I've already replaced bilge pumps and fresh water pumps.

We did the big jump across the gulf moving the boat from Ft Myers, FL to Gulf Shore, AL. 56 hours and nary a hiccup from the engine.

I use just under 2 gal/hr at a cruising speed of 1700 RPM. This gives me 7-9 knots depending on currents and wind. Top RPM is 2100 and delivers about 10 knots.

I've learned to dock OK, but I am very aware of wind speed, direction and current. I feel comfortable that I will get better with more practice.
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Old 11-16-2017, 11:47 PM   #29
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I've had twins in most boats I've owned in 60 years. Mostly singles in commercial boats. I like the back up, but have only returned on one engine twice in those 60 years. But they have always been heavy duty diesels. Not yacht duty. I have never damaged a prop on twins. Twins don't take twice as much fuel as a single unless you're running flat out in a sport fisher. Twins allow a faster cruising speed in a displacement hull. I burn 8.5 g/h @ 10kts in an 80 ton, 83' boat. And that's not the most economical speed, but I like it. I've never felt I needed a bow thruster and can dock anywhere there is 83'. I have even backed into an opposite slip in order to enter a slip where the passage between slips was 60'. Even in marinas with multiple 90 turns. Twins make handling so much easier.
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Old 11-17-2017, 02:22 AM   #30
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Based on personal observation, twins are at least as maneuverable as a single with bow thruster. Personally, with a single engine and a bow thruster, I don't feel handicapped.
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Old 11-17-2017, 09:26 AM   #31
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The twin is a wonderful boat.
But the single is a better boat.
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Old 11-17-2017, 09:01 PM   #32
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Here is a single Cummins 210 HP in a Monk 36. I imagine a single in a GB 36 would have similar access to both sides.
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Old 11-17-2017, 09:08 PM   #33
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I have a single and I wish my ER was so clean and accessible

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Old 11-17-2017, 10:03 PM   #34
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Quote:
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Here is a single Cummins 210 HP in a Monk 36. I imagine a single in a GB 36 would have similar access to both sides.
Thats why I would want a single... Great engine room Steve!
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Old 11-17-2017, 10:42 PM   #35
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We have a single and cruised 1,000's of miles with no problems and
we fitted a bow thruster when we bought the boat, the only point I would make is that whatever size bow thruster the manuf recommends for your boat go at least one, preferably 2, sizes up.
If wallet and ER permit the hydraulically driven is by far and away the best because when you need a bow thruster in earnest, a, the larger size is more effective and b, a hydraulic will keep on working whereas an electric has a thermal cut-out.
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