Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-21-2018, 10:28 AM   #21
Guru
 
firstbase's Avatar
 
City: Jupiter, Florida
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Black Eyed Susan
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42' Classic
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,474
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keysdisease View Post
If you like it, if it looks as least as bright as the original, and it turns on, well done, don't worry about it, carry on, and have a nice day.

Now how am I supposed to completely overthink a subject with people like you around? You are ruining my whole deal. You didn't happen to write that song "Don't Worry, Be Happy" did you???

I did test the angle of illumination in the slip and it seemed pretty much dead on. At least as close as one can judge these 1/2 a degree things. I still have to check out how they look from straight on, how close someone coming at me has to get in order to lose my lights. I think the angle is ok but not sure.
__________________
Advertisement

firstbase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 10:59 AM   #22
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 14,429
Greetings,
Mr. ASD. "The oil from you hand will reduce the life of the bulb." Well, for all practical purposes yes BUT it's not quite as simple as that.



Halogens run VERY hot and the envelope is quartz glass in order to resist the heat. The moisture/oils from your fingers will be burnt into the surface upon illumination and subsequent heating. Over time, the surface degrades and amount of light put forth diminishes. Internal temperatures increase, thus causing the tungsten filament to potentially evaporate at a greater rate or the surface of the quartz to etch to the point of failure.


IF you happen to handle the quartz bulb, you can readily clean it off with rubbing alcohol with no negative effects BEFORE you turn it on.
__________________

__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 11:38 AM   #23
Guru
 
Keysdisease's Avatar
 
City: South Florida
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 780
LOL, I understand your need to OCD this, there are times and issues where I feel a similar compulsion. The facts are that even the nav light manufacturers think the specifications for "bleed" past the degrees of arc are excessive, and the bulbs they are forced to use to comply do not tolerate the dynamic marine environment well at all, but regs are regs.

112.5 degrees?? 1 mile visibility from a 10 watt bulb?

I know a guy that hooked up his nav light to a running car battery on a couple feet of wire, drove another car 1 mile to see how visible it was, and when he got back the lens had melted. A running car battery on a couple feet of wire was pumping 13.8+ volts into a 12 volt bulb. He was way into overthinking it, and the manufacturer replaced his light, explained what happened, and suggested the light met the USCG and Colregs and no further testing was necessary.

Was that you by chance? If it comes on, you're good.

And I did not write that song, I just have Keysdisease

Here's to you and spending time on more appropriate endeavors, Cheers




Quote:
Originally Posted by firstbase View Post
Now how am I supposed to completely overthink a subject with people like you around? You are ruining my whole deal. You didn't happen to write that song "Don't Worry, Be Happy" did you???

I did test the angle of illumination in the slip and it seemed pretty much dead on. At least as close as one can judge these 1/2 a degree things. I still have to check out how they look from straight on, how close someone coming at me has to get in order to lose my lights. I think the angle is ok but not sure.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	sunset toast.jpg
Views:	48
Size:	30.4 KB
ID:	82174  
Keysdisease is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 11:51 AM   #24
Guru
 
firstbase's Avatar
 
City: Jupiter, Florida
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Black Eyed Susan
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42' Classic
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,474
TO check the illumination angle my wife suggested that she hold a 180 degree protractor on the bottom of the nav light board under the light with a string attached to the bottom of the light. I would then take the long string off the boat and circle aft on the dock. Then I tell her when I can no longer see the light. She would then read the angle on the protractor.

I sure do love that woman. We are quite the match.
firstbase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 01:05 PM   #25
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,641
Quote:
Originally Posted by firstbase View Post
My knowledge of light waves and optics is less than my knowledge of thermodynamics and I know nothing about thermodynamics. BUT....if I remember right...the green/red lenses will let more green/red light through than white light. I think that is the theory. All I know is that they appear brighter than when I had white LED bulbs. I don't think it is due to the newness of the bulb or lumens as the old bulbs were the same manufacturer and design as the new only the new are colored. I did clean the lenses but they weren't in bad shape.



I'm sure someone with some REAL knowledge can chime in and lay some science on the situation but to answer your question, yes, they do appear brighter.

I’ve never seen any specific definitions of red or green in the USCG regulations. I imagine they are there, but I’ve never found them. It would seem odd that the USCG would have requirements for the frequency of a vessel’s horn but not wavelength of the running lights.

Anyway, the only concern I would have about using a colored LED inside a colored lens is dependent on the narrowness of the wavelength of the lens filter transmittance and the LED output spectrum. Most colored lenses, such as used in traditional running lights, have a relatively broad transmittance spectrum. The idea is that if you put white light behind a colored filter then the filter will block out all the light except that which it transmits. A colored LED has a relatively narrow spectral range. The problem would occur if the colored lens also had a relatively narrow transmission band that doesn’t correspond well with the LED spectrum. In that case the lens would be filtering out more of the LED energy making the LED appear less bright.

The same can happen with a white LED. Most white LEDs have a higher Kelvin value than incandescent bulbs, ie more blue light and less red light. The peak wavelength intensity for most white LEDs is definitely in the blue range, less in the green, and even less in the red. So, if you were going to use a white LED behind a colored filter, you would try to pick a “warm” light for the red filter and more neutral color temp white light for the green. Even so, you likely would get more light out of a colored lens by using a colored LED than a white LED.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 03:14 PM   #26
Guru
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Country: US
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 8,933
All this is why I just bought approved LED lights when I replaced mine.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 03:59 PM   #27
Guru
 
firstbase's Avatar
 
City: Jupiter, Florida
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Black Eyed Susan
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42' Classic
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,474
Mine are "Approved" and "Marine". Just not sure how much that really means. I have read that new lights from a quality manufacturer are matched, lens and bulb, to ensure proper wavelength compatibility or emission. If bulb and lens compatibility is that important then I am not sure how "approved" can carry much weight as they haven't a clue which lens I am using.
firstbase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 04:53 PM   #28
Veteran Member
 
City: East Islip
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Giddy II
Vessel Model: 1974 Grand Banks 32
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 37
"......you likely would get more light out of a colored lens by using a colored LED than a white LED."

OK, I am officially not the brightest bulb in this conversation because this is all I really understood in this post.
BUT you did answer my question. Thanks!
Mike GB32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 04:58 PM   #29
Technical Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5,831
When looking at your boat from straight ahead at night (dock, other boat, whatever), you want to see both the red and green. A little off to either side, one or the other should vanish.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 05:17 PM   #30
Guru
 
High Wire's Avatar
 
City: Cape May, NJ and Englewood, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irish Lady
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,415
Thought PSNEELD would have responded by now:
https://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageNam...lesAmalgamated
Scan down to Annex I and then look for Intensity. Drink a cup of hi test coffee first.
__________________
Archie
Irish Lady
1984 Monk 36 Hull #46
Currently in New Jersey.
High Wire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 05:49 PM   #31
Guru
 
alormaria's Avatar
 
City: Trenton
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,232
The Coast Guard asked him to come back as a consultant to test pleasure boat navigation lights for proper angle and candlepower.
__________________
Al Johnson
34' Marine Trader
"Angelina"
alormaria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 06:48 PM   #32
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,641
Quote:
Originally Posted by High Wire View Post
Thought PSNEELD would have responded by now:
https://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageNam...lesAmalgamated
Scan down to Annex I and then look for Intensity. Drink a cup of hi test coffee first.

Thanks for the link. It led me to the National Bureau of Standards, “Colors of Signal Lights”. 50 pages of information that I once knew but most of which I have forgotten. It predates LED lights but the concepts they discuss for various light sources still holds true. They discuss the issue of the interaction of the chromicity of the light source and the transmittance of the filter.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2018, 10:38 PM   #33
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 5,897
Quote:
Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
Greetings,
Mr. ASD. "The oil from you hand will reduce the life of the bulb." Well, for all practical purposes yes BUT it's not quite as simple as that.



Halogens run VERY hot and the envelope is quartz glass in order to resist the heat. The moisture/oils from your fingers will be burnt into the surface upon illumination and subsequent heating. Over time, the surface degrades and amount of light put forth diminishes. Internal temperatures increase, thus causing the tungsten filament to potentially evaporate at a greater rate or the surface of the quartz to etch to the point of failure.


IF you happen to handle the quartz bulb, you can readily clean it off with rubbing alcohol with no negative effects BEFORE you turn it on.
100%
Alaskan Sea-Duction is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2018, 07:42 AM   #34
Guru
 
wkearney99's Avatar
 
City: Bethesda, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Solstice
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 47 Eastbay FB
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,386
My Grand Banks has the Aqua Signal series 41 lights. I recently replaced their bulbs with LEDs from Marine Beam. That and the starboard side housing was cracked, and I found a replacement for it via eBay.

My advice is open one of them and look for identifying marks. There should be some kind of label or part number molded into it somewhere. They do look like ones Perko made.
__________________
-- Bill Kearney
2005 Eastbay 47 FB - Solstice
wkearney99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2018, 01:21 PM   #35
Newbie
 
City: Atlanta
Country: USA
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 1
Another component of the light is the interior reflective surfaces of the lamp. They start out shiny chrome or brass but lose a lot of that over time. I put Solas tape in my lamps to restore the reflectivity of the lamp. Using the original bulb, this should not affect the focus of the lens as it is just a restoration to "new" condition. The lights are very noticeably brighter.
K2D2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2018, 05:13 PM   #36
Member
 
City: San Luis obispo
Country: United States
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 5
Keep the lights, but man you need to spring for a new tape measure.😀
Mmfitzpatrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2018, 05:39 PM   #37
Guru
 
firstbase's Avatar
 
City: Jupiter, Florida
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Black Eyed Susan
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42' Classic
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,474
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mmfitzpatrick View Post
Keep the lights, but man you need to spring for a new tape measure.😀
Even tape measures got some mojo in 'em.
firstbase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2018, 05:44 AM   #38
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 21,799
I believe the inside of a light housing should be non reflective.

Like the light screens/shadowboards being painted flat black, if reflective it would make the angle of view too variable.

All measurements in diagrams of lights I see are from the filament.

This is why the argument about replacing incandescent bulbs with some LEDs has merit.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2018, 07:52 AM   #39
Guru
 
firstbase's Avatar
 
City: Jupiter, Florida
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Black Eyed Susan
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42' Classic
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,474
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
I believe the inside of a light housing should be non reflective.

Like the light screens/shadowboards being painted flat black, if reflective it would make the angle of view too variable.

All measurements in diagrams of lights I see are from the filament.

This is why the argument about replacing incandescent bulbs with some LEDs has merit.
I wasn't going to say anything because A) I really don't know much and B) I thought I might have read it wrong or dreamed it but.... In my search for info on the LED's I also read that the inside reflective surfaces should be black not reflective which is the opposite of what I was thinking. Go figure.
firstbase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2018, 10:07 AM   #40
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,641
Quote:
Originally Posted by firstbase View Post
I also read that the inside reflective surfaces should be black not reflective which is the opposite of what I was thinking. Go figure.
Isn't black kind of the opposite of a "reflective surface"?

It is black because it absorbs all colors.
__________________

__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×