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Old 06-02-2018, 02:12 PM   #21
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interested. can i see the boat details?
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Old 06-02-2018, 04:59 PM   #22
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private message sent to paulga
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Old 06-02-2018, 05:25 PM   #23
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For a liveaboard, a sundeck model will give you the most room for its size.
I have a PT35 Sundeck located in Easthampton, Long Island, New York
which I use mostly to liveaboard during the summers. She has a single 225HP diesel which allows speeds higher then normal trawlers but is still extremly
economical to use. With air conditioning, heat, full size fridge, two heads, two staterooms, generator, gas stove etc. she makes a great liveaboard or cruiser.
Contact me if you are interested in coming aboard. As I now live in Florida,
she may become available for sale.
I surely do agree with Ben...

Regarding: Sun deck is a greatly roomy and relaxing out door fun place to enjoy days/evenings at anchor. Nice during slow cruises in calm waters too.

Must say that I also much prefer a flying bridge for even more room aboard and for most of the time piloting too. Good sized swim platform off the transom is also high up on my list. Wife likes galley in the salon and we both love large salon windows. Those items as well as other "things" make boating a real pleasure. Thus the name age old colloquial-marine term "Pleasure Boating".

Item I'd also like to mention: Twin engines are very nice to have for many reasons. For pleasure boating I believe in planing hulls; semi planing is fine too. I don't particularly like displacement hulls for several reasons regarding general "Pleasure Boating". Displacement hull design is very good for very long range at slow speed with active stabilizers whenever sizable seas come into play. Planing hull with hard chines and enough engine HP to enable available speed capabilities can make a boat work well in many sea conditions. In other words: For long range cruising get a displacement hull boat. For general, relaxing pleasure boating get a planing hull boat.

Now back to the item about single or twins. Each to their own on this. Seeing as planing hull is my preferred choice for a pleasure boat the engine or engines need to have considerable HP capabilities to reach speeds whenever I desire or require.

Here are reasons I "really" like twins:
1. Maneuverability at slow speeds in forward or reverse
2. Capability to walk the boat sideways via correct rudder-angles / throttle placement sand opposing transmission directions
3. Extra reliability - I like redundancy on boats - twin screws / pilot stations / heads / sleeping quarters / props / rudders / compasses... etc
4. Capability to shut one engine down and cruise slowly on the other with minimal fuel usage.
5. Last but not least; for when desired: Sheer power to have the "Pleasure Boat" plane over/through the water at a fast enough clip so that destinations can be reached without taking too much time.

Here's the one thing that [in my opinion] twins do have against them - an increase [basically a doubling] of general maintenance costs and efforts... which for me is surely OK when taking into account the five reasons mentioned above as to why I "really" like twins!

Happy Boat-Choice Daze! - Art
PS: The "[basically a doubling] of general maintenance costs and efforts" [for twins compared to a single engine] is meaning the actual parts/product used on the engines. Time and effort for getting tools ready and then putting them away is the same for twins as for singles. Toting new parts aboard and used parts/oils off is double effort for twins.
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Old 06-02-2018, 06:15 PM   #24
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most of the trawlers that come out of search are displacement hull, limited to slower speed.
It's nice to to imagine moving the boat sideways. is it impossible with a single engine?
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Old 06-02-2018, 06:52 PM   #25
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not all twins will move sideways without just the right conditions, hull shape, location and size of rudders/props, etc...

a single pretty much needs thrusters unless it has a modified rudder (shape or max swing) and a dang competent skipoer.

after almost 15,000 miles of ACIW in a single and probably another 40,000 in twins......

if I had to do it over again, I might go twins as they might offer the flexibility to where I spend getting the boat fixed. Especially if it might be weeks or more.....this is because I am a liveaboard and would need to stay onboard or nearby to do most of the work.
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Old 06-02-2018, 07:25 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by paulga View Post
most of the trawlers that come out of search are displacement hull, limited to slower speed.
It's nice to to imagine moving the boat sideways. is it impossible with a single engine?
Paul - Please understand...

The recreational-boating/style-of-boat moniker "Trawler" a few decades ago originated as a promotional enhancement - - > for another way to make it sound sexy while selling more boats!

There seems to be no firm definition as to what a "Trawler" actually is. That fact has been well hashed over on several TF threads. I don't use that term for my current nor any other of my or my family's previous boats.

The term "Trawler" seems to extend as a usable moniker to nearly any boat whose owner likes the word Trawler...

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Old 06-02-2018, 08:11 PM   #27
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I was referring to the boat type used in my search
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Old 06-02-2018, 09:04 PM   #28
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I was referring to the boat type used in my search
I understand. Please don't take offence.


Didn't particularly mean to pinpoint that post only at you, even though I used your name. Just explaining what I know so all could think on reasoning that propels the model-name "Trawler".
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Old 06-02-2018, 09:52 PM   #29
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to say offense, it's not even in the least
as a beginner, I have a lot more to know
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Old 06-02-2018, 11:53 PM   #30
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to say offense, it's not even in the least
as a beginner, I have a lot more to know
Got cha!

Lots will come forward for you from TF members!!
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Old 06-03-2018, 02:10 AM   #31
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Most so-called "trawler" boats have twin engines, capable of surpassing hull speed. So, that's what is most available. Still, high speeds equal high fuel consumption. Too me, the quintessential trawler has a single engine and is not capable of exceeding hull speed, cruising consuming less than two gallons of fuel per hour.. Most people want a fast cruiser, not a trawler.
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Old 06-03-2018, 06:30 AM   #32
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When beginning to look for a cruising home, or hobby , look at "trawlers" but also look at the other variants like "motor yachts" in the same size/price area .

There are far more non trawlers built in most sizes , so the creation of big numbers keeps the boats improving over the years.

Many are better cruisers for folks that spend 90 % of their time dockside , and only do the 200 Hours a year norm.

There is still the same huge difference in gear selected for dockside living or anchoring out, but "trawler" is not the only deck house style that will cruise comfortably and well.
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Old 06-03-2018, 08:02 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulga View Post
I was referring to the boat type used in my search
When Kim and I were looking at boats we would use the search feature as you are doing. We also would use the option of multiple boat types in our search

Aft Cabin--Trawler--- Motor yacht Combos like that
It will depend on how the broker listed the boat that will show in searches
At least on YW... Sometime you find the boat you are looking for under a different search due to poor listing conditions.
Must say Love the Sundeck Love the twins Love the FB

Enjoy the search
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Old 06-03-2018, 10:12 AM   #34
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Grand Banks...... nice boats BUT, maintaining the exterior teak will be expensive. Based on my own experience, when I was looking a used boat, if it had exterior teak, I took it off my list of "possibles".
You might be able to find a decent 34 American Tug. The only caution I will give you about the AT is what I consider a lack of (for me and a mate) storage for clothing if you are moving to a year round live aboard. The ATs (fast trawler) seem to hold their resale value.
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Old 06-03-2018, 11:23 AM   #35
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Getting back to the original questions...I agree with others to set your price range first, then find the best you can there. It all depends on your needs, but Iíve enjoyed getting a bit more space and features by sacrificing age. And contrary to many, I love the exterior teak, no matter the work.
There are plenty of ways to get loans and insurance for older boats. Check out LightStream. Check out GEICO. I donít think youíll be able to deduct the interest though.
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Old 06-03-2018, 11:39 AM   #36
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Getting back to the original questions...I agree with others to set your price range first, then find the best you can there. It all depends on your needs, but Iíve enjoyed getting a bit more space and features by sacrificing age. And contrary to many, I love the exterior teak, no matter the work.
There are plenty of ways to get loans and insurance for older boats. Check out LightStream. Check out GEICO. I donít think youíll be able to deduct the interest though.
Teak; I learned my lesson with my Nordhavn, no thank you.

Interest on a boat loan? Check with your CPA or tax preparer. Generally speaking, if you fulfill the requirements for a second home, you can deduct the interest.
Galley, (fridge, stove, sink, running water), separate head and shower, sleeping quarters, for a start.
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Old 06-03-2018, 12:09 PM   #37
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live aboards are allowed in 79th boat basin and some marinas that I confirmed. otherwise it's on a case by case basis.
Took us 10 years on the waiting list to get into the 79th St BB. We don't sleep aboard but gets rough when the ferry traffic starts up way before the morning and evening rush hours. $120/ft for the summer season, maybe $90-$100 for winter and they only offer it based on seniority because they only have water/electric(?) on a couple of docks. They did start offering it to me after about 4 years. During the lowest tides of the year (only January) there is maybe a foot of water there on a couple of days for a couple of hours. During the rest of the year you'll just be kicking up mud if you leave/return around low tide so be careful about draft.
They of course require insurance.

I have a love/hate relationship with that marina. Super convenient for me and very nice people in the office but rocky,shallow and tight with few normal marina amenities. NYC runs a marina in Brooklyn and another in Queens that are probably a little cheaper and probably don't have the wait list.
Then of course there is always one15 marina by the Brooklyn Bridge at only $315/ft Oneį15 Brooklyn Marina – Welcome to New York's Newest and Finest Marina or the marinas in NJ like liberty landing at $250-$320/ft for the year.

Right now we have this guy anchored right outside the 79St Boat Basin.

https://www.boatinternational.com/ya...p-yacht--36319

Regarding the 78 vs 79 Albin, that 78 looks like you can move in and not worry about anything for a while though the price seems on the high side. The less expensive 79 looks like there might be some deferred maintenance, especially if you want to cruise it.

Best of luck in your search.
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Old 06-03-2018, 12:14 PM   #38
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Irrespective to if exterior boat wood is teak, mahogany, oak or any other type... Having spent many of my young years on and about wooden boats, in family and working for boat yards, I strongly recommend "No Exterior Wood".


Unless, maybe, you like to spend hours after hours keeping the wood in good condition... or letting the wood go to crap... or taking the time and expense to remove the wood for replacement with much less work-required materials.


That's my feelings. Yours may vary greatly!


Happy Boat-Search Daze! - Art


PS: Interior wood is a joy to have and little effort to keep in great condition.
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Old 06-03-2018, 02:13 PM   #39
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If you're preference for diesel is flexible...consider the Carver 326 Aft cabin..seems to be in your price range, and readily available and much newer. Diesel purists will liken a gas boat to having live grenages in your bilge....but educate yourself.....the more a boat is stationary..ie: dock condo.....gas might be a viable way to get more boat for less money
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Old 06-03-2018, 03:11 PM   #40
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Generally speaking, if you fulfill the requirements for a second home, you can deduct the interest.

Galley, (fridge, stove, sink, running water), separate head and shower, sleeping quarters, for a start.


Thanks! I think you just saved me some money!
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