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Old 09-29-2019, 08:23 AM   #1
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Inflatable Boat UV Protector

I have purchased and will be receiving this week a new inflatable boat (Zodiac RIB Aluminum) . I plan to apply a UV inhibitor on the new boat. I have used the 303 Marine & Aerospace in the past. I just saw on Defenders website a product called "August Race" Tube UV Conditioner. August Race notes that the product only needs to be applied on an annual basis.

Seems like the company is from the UK. Has anyone out there used this product? If so, please comment.

Thanks!
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Old 09-29-2019, 12:15 PM   #2
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I just saw on Defenders website a product called "August Race" Tube UV Conditioner. August Race notes that the product only needs to be applied on an annual basis.



Seems like the company is from the UK. Has anyone out there used this product? If so, please comment.

It would seem to me that just about any snake oil would seem to be effective at protecting a RIB from UV in the UK....
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Old 09-29-2019, 12:36 PM   #3
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I have purchased and will be receiving this week a new inflatable boat (Zodiac RIB Aluminum) . I plan to apply a UV inhibitor on the new boat. I have used the 303 Marine & Aerospace in the past. I just saw on Defenders website a product called "August Race" Tube UV Conditioner. August Race notes that the product only needs to be applied on an annual basis.

Seems like the company is from the UK. Has anyone out there used this product? If so, please comment.

Thanks!
No , but we always had best results with Aurora products for the inflatables.
Poly guard was easy to apply and resisted UV , dirt, stains etc

https://www.auroramarine.ca/store/poly-guard.html
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Old 09-29-2019, 01:35 PM   #4
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It would seem to me that just about any snake oil would seem to be effective at protecting a RIB from UV in the UK....
That was my very first thought. Lol
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Old 09-29-2019, 02:13 PM   #5
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I find it hard to believe that ay rub-on solution can effectively block UV and protect your RIB. Think about that thick white goop you need to apply as sun block for your skin. That sort of works but not for long in the water. Usual approach I have seen that probably does work is to cover as much tube as practical with cloth "saddles". Not only protect the tubes but also keeps them cooler to sit on.
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Old 09-29-2019, 02:58 PM   #6
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I find it hard to believe that ay rub-on solution can effectively block UV and protect your RIB. Think about that thick white goop you need to apply as sun block for your skin. That sort of works but not for long in the water. Usual approach I have seen that probably does work is to cover as much tube as practical with cloth "saddles". Not only protect the tubes but also keeps them cooler to sit on.

Excellent point Chris.
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Old 09-29-2019, 03:27 PM   #7
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I find it hard to believe that ay rub-on solution can effectively block UV and protect your RIB. Think about that thick white goop you need to apply as sun block for your skin. That sort of works but not for long in the water. Usual approach I have seen that probably does work is to cover as much tube as practical with cloth "saddles". Not only protect the tubes but also keeps them cooler to sit on.
Waxes and sealants on your car and boat reflect UV - same with the coatings on glasses.
UV protection on RIBS does help - we have had our share of RIBS to see the results.
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Old 09-29-2019, 03:46 PM   #8
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...Usual approach I have seen that probably does work is to cover as much tube as practical with cloth "saddles". Not only protect the tubes but also keeps them cooler to sit on.
Or also referred to as "dinghy chaps". There are some YouTube videos on how to make them as do some sail makers/canvas shops.
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Old 09-29-2019, 04:54 PM   #9
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Interesting. So instead of a full cover (which I would love to do, but is hard when on anchor), you use a cover that just go over the tubes? I’ll check out the “Dingy Chaps”. Thanks
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Old 09-29-2019, 04:59 PM   #10
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What originally caught my attention was the “annual application” on the August Race website. 303 recommends monthly applications. My concern (had this happen in the past with a different product) is “stickiness”. Ever had that, you restore or treat an inflatable and end up with a sticky feel, which also holds on to dirt.
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Old 09-29-2019, 05:24 PM   #11
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Here’s a Sailrite vid on dinghy chaps.

https://www.sailrite.com/How-to-Make-Dinghy-Chaps-Video
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Old 06-06-2020, 05:35 PM   #12
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We recently bought a new inflatable tender so I decided to have a go at making dinghy chaps. I followed a sailrite video for the most part. Very happy with the result. Click image for larger version

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Old 06-06-2020, 06:17 PM   #13
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No , but we always had best results with Aurora products for the inflatables.
Poly guard was easy to apply and resisted UV , dirt, stains etc

https://www.auroramarine.ca/store/poly-guard.html
Is this Poly-Guard product any relation to Poly-Glow?

Hopefully users don't get the same negative results after a couple of seasons...
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Old 06-06-2020, 08:11 PM   #14
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If your new dinghy is made from PVC, and you want a reasonable life out of it, then go for the "chaps". Unless you reapply the protectant very regularly, you will get sticky tubes, and sooner if you live in a very sunny locale. Like was stated, think about the fact that you have to reapply sunscreen, and it would be similar for a dinghy where the product is rubbed and is "slid" through the water at speed!
If the material is hypalon, then a product application may be effective enough. The chaps will provide the best protection, but will need replaced themselves over time.
Good luck with your decision, but I hate sticky tubes!
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Old 06-06-2020, 09:49 PM   #15
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If your new dinghy is made from PVC, and you want a reasonable life out of it, then go for the "chaps". Unless you reapply the protectant very regularly, you will get sticky tubes, and sooner if you live in a very sunny locale. Like was stated, think about the fact that you have to reapply sunscreen, and it would be similar for a dinghy where the product is rubbed and is "slid" through the water at speed!
If the material is hypalon, then a product application may be effective enough. The chaps will provide the best protection, but will need replaced themselves over time.
Good luck with your decision, but I hate sticky tubes!
I've used 303 protectant on Hypalon and PVC boat tubes. I've never encountered stickiness. On the hypalon tubes you don't really notice the 303. However, I found that the 303 makes the PVC more slippery, not sticky.

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I find it hard to believe that ay rub-on solution can effectively block UV and protect your RIB. Think about that thick white goop you need to apply as sun block for your skin.
There are plenty of clear solutions that you apply to your skin that block UV. Even the white goop becomes transparent as you rub it on (except for zinc oxide ointment). Lots of chemistry involved that makes creams, lotions, and sprays UV blocking.
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Old 06-07-2020, 12:17 AM   #16
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The manufacturer of my Korean built PVC (Island Inflatables brand)dinghy makes a good quality cover for it. Seems to do well,doesn`t cost much. I had one from another maker and it was a pos, dying in months. They make a range of dinghy sizes,hypalon as well as PVC, which should also fit dinghies they didn`t make. Possibly easier to attach a cover than smear on protectant.
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Old 06-07-2020, 12:56 AM   #17
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Agree Bruce.
SSbol, I wasn't talking about the 303 making the PVC sticky....... that happens over time by sun damage, quicker in areas with more direct sun. It happened to my old dinghy even up here in the North. My suggestion was, if you are looking for the longest life out of a PVC dinghy, especially in sunny areas, then 'chaps" maybe your best option. There are other options as well. If left in the sun, a PVC dinghy will definitely deteriorate faster than a Hypalon one, and unless you are "religious" with the wiped on protectant, then it will only provide a limited amount of protection.
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