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Old 11-29-2020, 06:23 PM   #61
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I cringe when I see divers in our local marina cleaning or inspecting boats. Stray currents can be deadly.
Lotta hull cleaners being hurt or killed in Annapolis, are there?
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Old 11-29-2020, 06:57 PM   #62
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Anyone Try this Dive System

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Old 11-29-2020, 06:59 PM   #63
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Look, diving can be fun if you are trained..... get training with your hookah and if you have the time, get certified in open water.
I dont want to read, we have lost a member due to a diving accident that could have been prevented if the person took a certification course.
I used to dive before certification was required yet, I did get certified maybe 10 years ago when I finally bought SCUBA equipment.

I am a firm believer of remaining tethered to the boat unless you are intent on SCUBA diving, then, do not dive alone. Even anchored, a boat can drift. If you are tethered to the boat, you will drift with the boat.

I am not a trainer nor an authority on diving.
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Old 11-29-2020, 07:06 PM   #64
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I don’t know about there or anywhere else but I’d rather hire a professional to inspect or clean my boat vs. DYI, and I’m not opposed to DYI-ing. When we were in NJ and the State police needed to do an under water crime scene search at our marina they required the marina to shut off the dock power for the entire day each day when the divers were under water. Some things are best left for the pros to do.

Many would rather hire pros than DIY...that doesn't mean DIYers are stupid, risk takers or dangerous.


Taking the necessary precautions after a reasonable amount of training/research....asking a few pros for advice...etc...etc...and a hooka shouldn't be a death defying operation.


Boating in general can be dangerous on many levels...heck go to any thread discussing gasoline boats...according to some here on TF, every marina is a ticking time bomb that could blow at any minute .


Big difference between a crime scene search in a marina covering a lot of bottom and cleaning or working on one boat that can easily be turned off for an hour or so.....
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Old 11-29-2020, 07:11 PM   #65
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When we were in NJ and the State police needed to do an under water crime scene search at our marina they required the marina to shut off the dock power for the entire day each day when the divers were under water. Some things are best left for the pros to do.
In fresh or even brackish water that is not unreasonable if you suspect you have had an ESD.



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Old 11-29-2020, 07:15 PM   #66
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I employ a diver to clean and inspect my hull even though I am capable to performing that myself.
The only rule my diver has, don't start the main engine or generator. Or mess with the thrusters.
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Old 11-29-2020, 07:21 PM   #67
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Have worked many a salvage in marinas with "pro" divers and NEVER have they even shut down a whole dock let alone a whole marina in salt water.


Just no need to unless rapidly moving slip to slip where turning off individual boats that fast would be an issue.


https://www.electricshockdrowning.or...ember_2018.pdf


There are, however, some steps that professional divers can take to reduce their risk of electric shock injury and ESD. Their safety may also include working with marina and boatyard management to properly coordinate and manage diving operations to enhance safety.

1. Marinas and boatyards should be aware of any diving operations in their facilities. They should require divers to formally check in and check out with marina staff. They should ensure that the boat involved in the diving operations is completely unplugged from any potential source of electricity ashore before permitting any diving on that boat. It is also recommended that the boats immediately adjacent to or across from the intended boat be unplugged for diver’s safety
.2.Marinas and boatyards should consider the use of “diving windows” on a periodic basis (e.g. bimonthly) to facilitate diving operations. During this window, diving could be permitted on a complete dock or section of dock by turning off the feeder breakers supplying electricity to these areas. The windows could be published to enable planning for routine maintenance.

3.Marinas and boatyards should have a plan to deal with electrical shock in the water around their facilities.

a.This would include knowing precise locations and having direct access to shutting off electrical power where necessary in an emergency.

b. It would also include emergency notifications (911 call) and a plan to rescue anyone in the water incapacitated or being shocked.
c.A long sturdy non conductive pole should be readily available to push a victim AWAY from the dock to get them farther from the electrical source. d.Throwable life rings should be at the ready (but should not be used to pull a person back to the dock or boat to avoid getting them closer to the electrical source.

e.Facilities should consider installing emergency electrical cut off switches in key locations such as at the head of a dock.

f.Marinas and boatyards should periodically train for electric shock scenarios and include local first responders in this training. It is imperative that the staff and first responders know how to turn power off in an emergency (and before rescuers attempt to get into the water for a rescue).



4. Divers should consider taking the following steps to reduce their risk of injury or death in the presence of electricity while diving on boat in facilities using electrical power.

a.Ensure, as a minimum, that the boat they are diving on is UNPLUGGED (not just turned off at the pedestal). Hang a “lockout” tag on the receptacle and breaker to preclude a passerby or the owner from plugging boat in while diving operations are in progress

b.Unplug boats adjacent to the one(s) being worked on.

c.Wear a rubber wetsuit to include gloves and booties to improve insulation to electrical current.

d.Check into the marina or boatyard facility so somebody knows where you will be diving. Strongly consider having a buddy stationed on the dock who knows where to secure dock power, and who can call 911 if required.

e.If you feel even the slightest of tingling sensations when entering the water, STOP and leave the water. Report the situation to the facility for investigation.
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Old 11-29-2020, 07:23 PM   #68
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Have worked many a salvage in marinas with "pro" divers and NEVER have they even shut down a whole dock let alone a whole marina in salt water.
Right, pros would know that to be pretty silly, in salt water.



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Old 11-29-2020, 07:25 PM   #69
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Let me put all this into perspective:

I have been a professional hull diver in the San Francisco Bay Area for 26 years. I conservatively estimate that in all that time, over 1.5 million in-water hull cleaning events have occurred here, virtually every single on of them at a dock with shorepower and certainly the very great majority of them performed on hookah. To my certain knowledge, not one of those hull cleanings has resulted in the serious injury or death of the diver due to ESD (electric shock drowning) or the failure of the air supply. That's a pretty impressive safety record. In point of fact, you are likely in more danger driving to the marina than you are diving in the marina.

All that said- its a different story when you're dealing with freshwater.
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Old 11-29-2020, 07:31 PM   #70
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Anyone Try this Dive System

[QUOTE=fstbttms;947546]Lotta hull cleaners being hurt or killed in Annapolis, are there? [/....
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Old 11-29-2020, 07:35 PM   #71
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Hmm thought I was on TF not FB.

Be careful what you post then....if you make fairly absolute sounding statements "Some things are best left for the pros to do. "....more than a occasional event or personal opinion backing that, is nice to keep the critics away...like my link above to the organization that is pretty involved with ESDs.
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Old 11-29-2020, 07:44 PM   #72
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Be careful what you post then....if you make fairly absolute sounding statements "Some things are best left for the pros to do. "....more than a occasional event of personal opinion backing that is nice to keep the critics away...like my link above to the organization that is pretty involved with ESDs.


Thx psneeld
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Old 11-30-2020, 10:51 PM   #73
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Getting back to the OP's first post. Here is another option for a compact scuba setup for short dives in shallow water. As always, anyone using SCUBA equipment of any kind should have proper training. But the system is pretty cool, but expensive:

https://www.mantusmarine.com/mantus-scuba/


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Old 12-01-2020, 08:17 AM   #74
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Some scuba divers think that hookahs are unsafe and like to tell others all about a subject they know little about.
Well-designed surface supplied air systems are not unsafe. I don't think anyone has stated that. I'm a scuba diver and I made my living in 1971-'72 diving on surface supplied air ever day in Bermuda working for a marine construction company. What can be unsafe is a person using surface supplied air who does not understand Boyles Law or the physiology of overexpanding your lungs. That can be easily learned by taking a basic scuba class.
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Old 12-01-2020, 08:58 AM   #75
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Getting back to the OP's first post. Here is another option for a compact scuba setup for short dives in shallow water. As always, anyone using SCUBA equipment of any kind should have proper training. But the system is pretty cool, but expensive:

https://www.mantusmarine.com/mantus-scuba/


IMO,
To me, the disadvantage of the Mantus system is the time limitation. Maybe 1/3 of a larger tank. I guess you could refill the Mantus tank from a larger tank? But when all the tanks are empty, the problem of finding a shop to refill all the tanks.

When it comes to a hookah, the disadvantage is dragging the hose behind you.
I like being tethered to the boat for one reason. If the boat drifts, you will drift with it.
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Old 12-01-2020, 09:09 AM   #76
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Hookas are like power tools, corded and battery powered.

Both have advantages and disadvantages. Both have similar dangers in using them. Granted power tools may not kill you outright...but just go with the concept.

Not following safety advice in operating anything can be dangerous and people prove it all the time...look at the warnings and cautions in owners manuals for the simplest of gear.

I tend to think the average TFer is smarter than a pet rock....more than one or two suggestions for training and warnings of misuse was plenty.

If they aren't smarter than a pet rock or don't research......even the best advice might be given into thin air.
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