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Old 09-19-2016, 03:49 AM   #81
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Oh yes, I recall a local boat, 50ft trawler, where the owner was filling up his fresh water tanks, forgot all about it, went home and then returned early in the morning to find his boat sitting on the bottom......
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Old 09-19-2016, 06:23 AM   #82
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For the truly fearful it would seem fairly easy to use a lawn watering 12V valve on the inlet with a float switch in the bilge, to control it.

Bilge high water = no dock water.
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Old 09-19-2016, 07:07 AM   #83
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I learned to set a timer on my phone when filling the water tank. It's too easy to get distracted doing other things.
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Old 09-19-2016, 07:54 AM   #84
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Oh yes, I recall a local boat, 50ft trawler, where the owner was filling up his fresh water tanks, forgot all about it, went home and then returned early in the morning to find his boat sitting on the bottom......
These stories are out there, but never seem to have any specifics. (Who, What, Why, When, Where?) If this is indeed what sank the boat, was the tank being filled by a hose? If so the top of the tank was open and the water would spill out and overboard. Or, was the tank being filled by a city water connection, in which case why did the tank vent not spill the excess water overboard? And Finally one would expect that a 50 foot trawler wuld have an automatic bilge pump and probably would have had 2 or even 3 bilge pumps. Why did they not handle the water? As previously mentioned we keep our boat connected when we are in a marina, but we live aboard, and we turn off the water if we leave the boat for more than a couple of hours.
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Old 09-19-2016, 09:21 AM   #85
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To be honest, I have not read all the posts on this subject. If not already addressed, what is a "flow restriction in - line governor " ? I am assuming that you are referring to a typical pressure reducing valve that reduces pressure to a pre-set outlet pressure. Then you go on and say that you reduce flow to only a trickle. I assume that you are doing this with some type of valve. If the valve you are using to restrict flow to "a trickle" is a ball valve or gate valve you are probably setting yourself up for a problem. If you must do that use a valve designed to throttle. Second, where are you restricting the flow to a trickle ? Is it before the pressure reducing valve ? If so, you have effectively reduced the performance of the pressure reducing valve (PRV) . I would take a cheap pressure gauge and take a reading of the pressure at the sink or on any of the interior plumbing fixtures. PRV's are flow operated, in other words they need a certain amount of flow to operate correctly extremely low flow will not activate the pressure reducing functions of the valve therefore allowing increased downstream pressures.
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Old 09-20-2016, 04:53 AM   #86
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"flow restriction in - line governor "

Two different items.

A pressure regulator will reduce water pressure to a pre set value .

Some folks think closing the dock valve to almost closed will lower the water pressure.

It will reduce the pressure and volume to an open hose , but as soon as the receiving side is closed the pressure will return to dock line pressure.

A total waste of time.
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Old 09-20-2016, 05:59 AM   #87
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These stories are out there, but never seem to have any specifics. (Who, What, Why, When, Where?) If this is indeed what sank the boat, was the tank being filled by a hose? If so the top of the tank was open and the water would spill out and overboard. Or, was the tank being filled by a city water connection, in which case why did the tank vent not spill the excess water overboard? And Finally one would expect that a 50 foot trawler wuld have an automatic bilge pump and probably would have had 2 or even 3 bilge pumps. Why did they not handle the water? As previously mentioned we keep our boat connected when we are in a marina, but we live aboard, and we turn off the water if we leave the boat for more than a couple of hours.
My recollection is that it occured around 2008 in Newport marina. The marina is shallow and only the back of the boat was resting on the bottom. Why the bilge pumps did not stop it from occurring I have no idea but the boat was well maintained so it's a good question. The boat is a sedan trawler and am assuming the water tanks are located under the saloon and under the waterline so any spill would not be able to spill out overboard.

I could name and shame the boat and the then owner on a public forum, but I don't do that.
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Old 09-20-2016, 06:33 AM   #88
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I find it interesting how each boater evaluates and prioritizes risks...
I am not trying to sway anyone here...just making an observation and a statement.

Many folks feel an open seacock is a risk and close them when not in use...others leave them open even when leaving the boat.

Some see shore water as too high a risk and wont use it...others use it cautiously while aboard. ...awake...etc.

How many have heard of (or have personally -ok I'll confess) boaters putting water in the fuel tank thinking they were filling the FW tank? I'll bet there are many but we interestingly perceive that risk differently.

The second part of the observatipn is that we are usually inconsistent in our risk evaluation...by that I mean...we dont tend to be overly cautious and consisyently choose the safest approach but rather seem to pick and choose where to be cautious.

Certainly there are devices, systems, ways to minimize the risks in all cases but we also frequently choose to not bother with the mitigation side of a risk.

And lastly...the justification tends to be antidotal vs fact or data based...I guess thats what makes us human
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Old 09-20-2016, 07:14 AM   #89
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I find it interesting how each boater evaluates and prioritizes risks...
I am not trying to sway anyone here...just making an observation and a statement.

Many folks feel an open seacock is a risk and close them when not in use...others leave them open even when leaving the boat.

Some see shore water as too high a risk and wont use it...others use it cautiously while aboard. ...awake...etc.

How many have heard of (or have personally -ok I'll confess) boaters putting water in the fuel tank thinking they were filling the FW tank? I'll bet there are many but we interestingly perceive that risk differently.

The second part of the observatipn is that we are usually inconsistent in our risk evaluation...by that I mean...we dont tend to be overly cautious and consisyently choose the safest approach but rather seem to pick and choose where to be cautious.

Certainly there are devices, systems, ways to minimize the risks in all cases but we also frequently choose to not bother with the mitigation side of a risk.

And lastly...the justification tends to be antidotal vs fact or data based...I guess thats what makes us human
Now that is a very astute observation.
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Old 09-20-2016, 07:18 AM   #90
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I learned to set a timer on my phone when filling the water tank. It's too easy to get distracted doing other things.
Nelson Automatic Water Timer | GEMPLER'S
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Old 09-20-2016, 09:01 AM   #91
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[QUOTE=tadhana;470333]
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1) I had a water hose come loose on my boat and dump the contents of the tank into the bilge. Apparently the PO or someone didn't assemble the fitting correctly. Hooked to city water and unattended, this would probably have sunk the boat.

The tank and its plumbing are on the suction side of the pump. The most pressure they will see is the head pressure at the height of the deck fill, perhaps 5-6 pi. The city water pressure is not hooked to the tank. It Ts in on the pressure side of the water pump. In this failure city water would not have flooded the boat.
You missed the point. You are focusing on the location of the failed fitting in my particular case, not the possibility of a fitting failing. If a fitting (or piping) fails on the city water side, the boat will have full city water pressure, limited only by the size of the piping for an unlimited time. You never run out of city water.

Your average bilge pump won't keep up with this flow rate and these pumps are not designed for continuous duty. Bye bye boat.
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Old 09-21-2016, 06:35 AM   #92
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"Your average bilge pump won't keep up with this flow rate and these pumps are not designed for continuous duty. Bye bye boat."

Same for seacock leak , except the flow rate may be higher.
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Old 09-21-2016, 06:46 AM   #93
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Back to evaluating risks.

Some have lived aboard and worked on the water around hundreds if not thousands of boats day in and day out.....and others.....

Well......
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Old 09-21-2016, 10:53 AM   #94
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Since I never will use a city water connection, I removed and capped the water line at the fitting. No worries about a leak there any more.
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Old 09-22-2016, 05:52 AM   #95
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The best way to have little fear from an underwater connection is to have fresh high quality hose fitted to it.
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Old 09-22-2016, 08:47 AM   #96
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Well I think this discussion will be finally resolved right after we determine which is the best anchor, which is better singles or twins, which prop nut goes on first. As one who lives "aboard and worked on the water around hundreds if not thousands of boats day in and day out." many comments here have raised the possible failure modes, but the probabilities are so very low. The examples of hypothetical failures include several simultaneous failures which are necessary to create a sinking. A bilge pump can handle it if large enough. My 1500 does handle it, but the discharge hose run is short, 6 feet. . A longer discharge with higher head might not keep up.. A bilge pump that cannot keep up will none the less slow the problem giving more time for the problem to be noticed. If you leave your boat unattended for long periods with the city water turned on, then you might be inviting trouble. Leaving the boat for a few hours has no demonstrated significant risk.
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Old 09-22-2016, 08:59 AM   #97
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Limit flooding risks and buy quality boat insurance.
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Old 09-22-2016, 01:36 PM   #98
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Some have lived aboard and worked on the water around hundreds if not thousands of boats day in and day out...........
And some of those folks are as dumb as a box of rocks. Doing the same thing over and over again doesn't make someone any smarter than the next guy.
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Old 09-22-2016, 01:40 PM   #99
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But some aren't, and see where real boating issues are...not what they hear or read about...they live it.

Never brought up smarter...just real experience.....
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Old 09-22-2016, 04:23 PM   #100
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And some of those folks are as dumb as a box of rocks. Doing the same thing over and over again doesn't make someone any smarter than the next guy.
Well thanks Wes K. I have been a marine industry professional designing, engineering, building and repairing boats my entire 50 year career. I'll just sit back shut up and let you armchair experts expound on how to do it.
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