Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-07-2015, 02:52 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
cool beans's Avatar
 
City: Norfolk, VA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 237
What Happens When You Unplug From the Dock?

Yes, this is a serious question!

Coming from the sailboat world. . .typically I find large battery banks kept full via solar and/or wind vanes with supplemental engine charging. Fridge/Freezers are fed from the battery bank and stoves/ovens are carbon fueled.

In instances like my sailboat that isn't equipped with the above, the fridge is shut down and everything transferred to a cooler for longer trips. This is used as an opportunity to defrost the evaporator Stove is alcohol fueled.

Most of the trawlers/MY I'm looking at online have no solar/wind charging, nor do they have more than 1-2 deep cycle batteries for the house. Hell, I've seen more than a few with electric ranges!

But everyone of them has a generator. . .

Do you guys just run your gennies whenever you shut down the main engines? Or am I mostly looking at boats never setup to leave the dock except every couple years for haulout? If your genny does just run 24/7 at anchor, does it get annoying?

Thanks!
__________________
Advertisement

cool beans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 03:04 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
City: Ft Lauderdale
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 120' Custom, Cat 3512's, 1750 HP ea.
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 159
I'm gen 24/7 away from dock. Annoying? Some, but that's why I get paid to do this job, LOL.
Besides, I like the A/C cold and the food hot just as much as my boss does,
__________________

BerettaRacer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 03:09 PM   #3
Guru
 
Heron's Avatar
 
City: Cypress Landing Marina (NC)
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Heron (2)
Vessel Model: '88 Cape Dory 28 Flybridge #115
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,077
I have very modest Electrical requirements... Less then 100 amp hours per day with fridge, electronics, lights etc. With a 440 Amp hour battery bank (4 golf cart batteries) I can go for 2 days out, not run the engine and still be within the 50% discharge guidelines. The secret to no generator use is big battery banks, and/or wind or solar.

If, by chance, we chose to use the electric range over the alchohol option, or make some hot water for a shower, I have a 2K watt portable generator that we'll run for a short bit. It will also charge the batteries through the onboard charger so I get a few amp hours back as a bonus..

As boats get bigger from here, their energy requirements increase dramatically...Hence the generator being common on 34'+ boats..
__________________
Steve
Heron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 03:14 PM   #4
Veteran Member
 
Paul Swanson's Avatar
 
City: Ventura CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Proud Mary
Vessel Model: Pacific Trawler
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 77
I just came back from 10 days at Catalina Island on a mooring. I have a propane stove, diesel heat (not needed this time of year), no AC and a 12 v freezer/refrig., LED lighting throughout, and a 2.5 kw inverter for occasional AC appliances. The boat does not have a generator but has 240 W of solar panels. By being careful we can just maintain the battery charge this time of year with long days and clear skys. In the winter I run out of battery power after 3-4 days. I could use another 200 W of solar power. This works well if you are willing to forgo 60" color TV, hair dryers, large freezers and heated spas.

Paul
Paul Swanson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 03:33 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Lutarious's Avatar
 
City: Oakland,Ca
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 108
My 44 foot trawler has a house bank of 5 big AGMs. 12v fridge, LED lights, propane stove and BBQ. Diesel heat and no AC. I can stay out pretty much indefinitely using the motor to top up batteries every day. The only real hog is the water heater, and we can run the genset for that every other day for dishes and showers....
Lutarious is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 03:45 PM   #6
TF Site Team
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Country: Texas
Vessel Model: Carver 356
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,630
IT'S OKAY....DON'T PANIC!!!!!
Now take a deep breath. You are going through the transitional phases of a recovering sailboaters. Unlike alcoholics, you can fully recover...but it will take some effort and some time. The one thing you need to say to yourself over and over and over...."It's ok to be comfortable...it's ok to be comfortable...it's ok to be comfortable"!!!!

And if you are ever just sitting there on your trawler and you find everything is just absolutely perfect and you have absolutely no further need to do anything other than enjoy it.....I would suggest getting a hammer and hitting your thumb with it. That way you can experience the misery you used to experience on your sailboat. I know it is not the same, but it helps!!! It's okay to be comfortable!!! Yes there is a bit of guilt, I know. Especially if you are Catholic like me. But it is okay to be comfortable. It is okay to run the generator. It is likely a LOT cheaper to buy install and maintain a generator than all of the crap related to solar and wind charging systems. And get this....a generator actually WORKS!!! You get stable 120 volt power at 60Hz!!!! It doesn't even need to be sunny outside for it to work!!! I'm serious!!!!...

I think I am going to sell(to recovering sailboaters) a hammer encased in a glass tube..."Break in case of emergency"....so that way if you find yourself just having way too much fun and being way too comfortable, you can break the glass and get the hammer and smash your thumb!!!!

PS....while yours was a serious question....this is not a serious answer!!!..
__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 04:26 PM   #7
TF Site Team
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Country: Texas
Vessel Model: Carver 356
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,630
My set up:

5 105ah AGM batteries. 4 for house and start and 1 isolated for generator start battery. I can isolate the house batteries but I don't. I feel that isolating the generator battery is enough backup as well as jumper cables. I rarely hang on anchor for days without using the generator. I live in Texas. It is either hot or cold. If I feel the need for the generator, I run it. If I don't, I don't. Rarely is it perfect like it is every day in SoCal. If I lived in SoCal I cold see how a set up like Mr. Swanson's could be desirable. In the PNW you could probably get by with his setup plus diesel heat. But, I like to be comfortable!!!! And I have the resources to be that way. And I am not afraid to use them nor do I feel guilty using them!!!
__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 04:50 PM   #8
Guru
 
hfoster's Avatar
 
City: Cleveland
Country: USA
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker View Post
IT'S OKAY....DON'T PANIC!!!!!
Now take a deep breath. You are going through the transitional phases of a recovering sailboaters. Unlike alcoholics, you can fully recover...but it will take some effort and some time. The one thing you need to say to yourself over and over and over...."It's ok to be comfortable...it's ok to be comfortable...it's ok to be comfortable"!!!!

And if you are ever just sitting there on your trawler and you find everything is just absolutely perfect and you have absolutely no further need to do anything other than enjoy it.....I would suggest getting a hammer and hitting your thumb with it. That way you can experience the misery you used to experience on your sailboat. I know it is not the same, but it helps!!! It's okay to be comfortable!!! Yes there is a bit of guilt, I know. Especially if you are Catholic like me. But it is okay to be comfortable. It is okay to run the generator. It is likely a LOT cheaper to buy install and maintain a generator than all of the crap related to solar and wind charging systems. And get this....a generator actually WORKS!!! You get stable 120 volt power at 60Hz!!!! It doesn't even need to be sunny outside for it to work!!! I'm serious!!!!...

I think I am going to sell(to recovering sailboaters) a hammer encased in a glass tube..."Break in case of emergency"....so that way if you find yourself just having way too much fun and being way too comfortable, you can break the glass and get the hammer and smash your thumb!!!!

PS....while yours was a serious question....this is not a serious answer!!!..

LOL: This was a hoot!. Thanks for the good laugh Baker

Happy cruising.

H. Foster
hfoster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 05:21 PM   #9
Guru
 
Carolena's Avatar
 
City: DC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carolena II
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 32/34
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 605
Similar set up to Heron. We have 4 golf cart batteries. We also have a diesel generator and two AC units. Generally, with led lighting, we can go a couple days without running the engine or genny. In reality, we run the generator for a couple hours in the evening to cool down the cabin, make hot water, and charge up the batteries (if the genny is on, we use it for as many systems as possible to load it up). We then shut down before bed and run a 12 volt fan. Come morning, we usually run the genny to make coffee, heat water, and top up batteries (and maybe run AC). Most days, we don't run it during daylight hours. Instead we open up the boat. ON the sailboat, we had a single house battery (group 31) and with an icebox that we converted to a very efficient fridge, led lights, and efficient 12 volt fans, we could still go at least two days without running the engine. LED lights have made a huge difference. Oh, and on the current boat if we want to watch TV and the genny isn't running, we have a small 100 watt inverter that plugs into a cig. lighter outlet in the pilot house and has no problem running the TV. In the past three years, we have only run the genny non stop one weekend (temps around 100). On the other hand, we have friends who start the genny the moment they leave the dock and don't shut it down until they return. As I recall, they sold their last boat with around 2000 hours on the mains and around 13,000 hours on the genny.
Carolena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 05:25 PM   #10
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: East Greenwich, RI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bella
Vessel Model: Mainship Pilot 34
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2,875
Cool Beans:


You have received several answers from trawler owners who have different DC needs, DC battery capacities and recharging capabilities. It all depends on how you use your boat. Different usage requires different systems to keep up.


I transitioned from a full time livea board sailing catamaran with lots of solar and 600 amp hours of battery capacity. I was able to stay on the hook for weeks at a time with only occasional engine running (with a high output alternator) after several cloudy days. I did use a solar shower.


My current boat, a downeast style trawler has an electric stove, a genset, no engine heated hot water, only electric, 220 AH of batteries and no solar. But we move every other day on a week long cruise.


So I run the genset for 30 minutes at night to heat water for showers and maybe cook. I run it again for 15 minutes in the morning for coffee. That 45 minutes of genset running probably only adds back 50 amp hours at best. We use about 100 amp hours a day.


But that works fine because our net loss of 50 AH a day for a couple of days is easily made up when we crank up the engine and motor for 4-5 hours to the next anchorage.


If we wanted to hang out on the hook for more days routinely, I would do one or more of the following: run the genset more, add a couple of hundred watts of solar, add more batteries, change the engine alternator to a 100 amp high output one. Since all but the first one cost more money, I would probably just run the genset more.


David
djmarchand is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 05:26 PM   #11
Wannabe
 
Britannia's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Stillwater
Vessel Model: Kadey-Krogen 54
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 766
I've just made the shift from sail to power. It was a bit shocking at first - but not too hard to get used to the good life!

My house bank is 5 x 225Ah 8D batteries - these will last me 2-3 days without charging. I'd like to add more so I can run generator free for longer. I have an espar diesel heater for heat on the hook. I also have 4 Cruisair systems (240V) for heat and a/c - but rarely need a/c here in CA. Two generators - 20kW and 8kW both 120/240V. Gens and main engine have their own starting batteries. Charger is 130A.

It seemed like a lot of stuff at first - but now it seems just right - and I have no qualms running my espresso maker. Heck - I even ran the water heater from the inverter by mistake one night. No problem!

My generators are pretty quiet inside the boat and also outside - so I don't feel too bad running them in an anchorage.

Richard
Stillwater
KK54
Britannia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 05:40 PM   #12
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by hfoster View Post
LOL: This was a hoot!. Thanks for the good laugh Baker

Happy cruising.

H. Foster
Howdy Henry! LTNotSeen ya posten...

Baker is a hilarious HooT!! Just wish he could begin again including his picts of pretty young gals. In that range he's a hilarious ol' BooT. Similar to you and me - but even funnier!

Cheers to you and yours! - Art
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 05:42 PM   #13
Moderator Emeritus
 
jwnall's Avatar
 
City: St. Marks, Florida
Country: US
Vessel Name: Morgan
Vessel Model: Gulfstar 36
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker View Post
The one thing you need to say to yourself over and over and over...."It's ok to be comfortable...it's ok to be comfortable...it's ok to be comfortable"!!!!
Priceless! And, as a (fully recovered) sailboater I can vouch for that feeling of guilt when comfortable, at first. :-)
__________________
John
jwnall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 06:02 PM   #14
Guru
 
MYTraveler's Avatar
 
City: West Coast
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 850
Genset is on 24/7 if I am not plugged into shore power. But my genset is so quiet, I often worry about forgetting to shut it off.
MYTraveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 06:06 PM   #15
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,979
My lil ol' Tolly tri cabin is full equipped as a comfortable anchor-out stay aboard. Really fun to play with, inexpensive to maintain.

Easy to keep powered. Twins' stbd engine charges all house batts when running. 7.5 Kw Kohler gen set usually fired-up 45 min to an hour in morn and eve; runs 60/80 amp batt charger as well as heats water, cools AC refrig, charges cell phones & computers, runs lights and AC tools if needed or charges tools portable batts as needed.

We have house bank containing 4 deep cell group 31's (also used as twin engine starters). Gen set has separate group 27 starter batt that charges off gen set when running and from small solar panel trickle charge all day. Also keep a totally isolated group 27 combo batt in it's own black batt box and 100% charged by a 2 amp trickle charger when gen set runs or plugged into dock power upon loading to cruise or returning to off load.

We do keep drink bottles in smaller coolers filled with ice and we have a big super cooler inside added insulation that we reload with ice as required. The AC refrig has a slide in plastic container we also keep filled with ice. Between the AC refrig cooling activated by gen set each morn and eve as well as it's small ice container all food stays well cooled.

Happy Boat-Energy Daze! - Art
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 06:25 PM   #16
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: JAX, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hobo
Vessel Model: Krogen 42-120
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,725
We have ~1100 amp hours in 10 Trojan T-105's. We converted the boat to mostly DC (water maker, microwave and water heater are AC). The fridge and freezer are custom DC units. We can leave the boat for 5 days at anchor and only be down 50% when batteries are full when we leave. All our lights are LED. Our generator run time is less than 2 hours per day. When we charge batteries the make water, heat water and any thing else that needs AC loads are on. Till recently we'd anchor our 6 months at a time and as much as 11 months out of 12. No solar and that may change. Insulation on the fridge and freezer and having an efficient higher output AC charger are critical.
Larry M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 06:49 PM   #17
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
I start the genny before I'm about leave the dock so I can seamlessly transfer the HVAC's and other 240/120v items. At anchor we run it, once we ran it 5 days in a row while at anchor.
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 07:09 PM   #18
Guru
 
TDunn's Avatar
 
City: Maine Coast
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Tortuga
Vessel Model: Nunes Brothers Raised Deck Cruiser
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 670
I have five grp 31 deep cycle batteries for 650 amp-hours capacity. I also have 100 watts of solar panels on the cabin top. I do not have a generator or shore power. The solar panels more than keep up with my power usage (refrigeration on all the time, webasto heater for cold nights, 100% LED lighting (except the trawler lantern which burns lamp oil), pressure water). I also have a small inverter to charge my computer battery and my Torqeedo outboard. When I am on the go the combination of solar and the output of my 115 amp alternator more than keeps up with my power usage. I don't have AC, but 9 of the 19 windows in the main cabin can be opened. I have gone for four years without using an AC powered battery charger and my batteries are currently at 100% charge.
TDunn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 07:22 PM   #19
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 4,806
My boat now has 900 +/- amp hours of storage. Finishing the conversion to all LED lights. While I do have an electric stove, the gas grill represents over 90% of my cooking. Should be able to sit for 3 or 4 days on the hook without charging. Expect to run the genset an hour per evening to make hot water and put some amps back in the bank. Maybe once every 5 days run for 3 or 4 hours to completely recharge, do a load of laundry, etc. As I expect to be under way every 2 or 3 days, batteries get charged and water gets heated as a function of motoring. Have a 3, 000 watt inverter than will run anything except washer / dryer, stove, water heater and AC units. Under comfortable conditions, very little generator use. Now if it gets hot, I'll run the generator as needed to stay reasonably comfortable. I'm fine with being efficient and conserving energy, but I'm not going to miserable when I cruise.

Ted
__________________
Blog: mvslowhand.com
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 07:40 PM   #20
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 10,170
Before unplugging at the dock, I switch on the inverter and transfer power of the backup 120V fridge to inverter. Underway the alternators individually charge the 660AH house bank (120A alt) and 8d start battery (55A alt) and heat the water. At anchor, no switching required to isolate the banks. No solar or wind power, but the Honda eu2000i generator runs a couple hrs morning and evening to provide power for Keurig coffee and microwave while charging house bank or heating water or running electric heat. We also have propane heat available if needed. No air conditioning needed in Northern CA but we run a couple of 12V DC fans and a 120V AC fan when needed. Shade screens and Breeze Booster help keep the interior from getting too hot.

I typically use about 180AH per day. If I don't reposition the boat, I can generate about 100-150AH with the Honda. If I run the mains a couple of hours to reposition, the house bank can get another 100-150 AH, if needed.

The two requirements that bring me back to a dock are water (75 gallons) and pumpout (40 gallons). Each of those can last a week (and more if I'm solo). I can easily carry and cool 2 weeks supply of food.

Without a doubt, my biggest power consumers are the refrigerators. Using iced coolers for drinks saves lots of electricity.

All lighting is LED including anchor light on/off via photocell. Propane stove/oven and grill for cooking. Microwave and Mr. Coffee can be run via inverter if needed while underway. (Yes, the Mr. Coffee serves as backup to the Keurig.)
__________________

__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012