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Old 04-03-2016, 08:46 PM   #1
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Quality Weather Gear

As we live in Florida we seldom need foul weather gear.

However we have decided to add some to the inventory on Sonas.

Sailing in Ireland we had some pretty heavy stuff that both kept us dry AND warm.

We feel we don't require warmth but weather resistance.

What do people recommend for good quality weather (water) resistance without being "heavy or hot?
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Old 04-03-2016, 09:37 PM   #2
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Try www.gillna.com
They handle various weights and supply gear to the sailing community.
Excellent quality.
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Old 04-03-2016, 11:10 PM   #3
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Grunden's
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Old 04-03-2016, 11:25 PM   #4
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A contradiction in terms in this part of the world. You can choose rain soaked or sweat soaked. On the boat, I go for the former.
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Old 04-04-2016, 01:53 AM   #5
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I keep a suit of Grundens. Petrus I think. Fairly light, so you can wear layers when it's cold, but not get too sweaty when it's warm. They're flexible and stretchy, so they're comfortable. you can get regular pants too, instead of bibs. I've worked mine pretty hard and they've held up well. They're pricey, but I'm very happy with them.

The Shirt
And the pants
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Old 04-04-2016, 06:13 AM   #6
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Traditional foul weather gear is hot, can't get away from it....

New sports gear is better, especially the high end stuff but it isn't very forgiving about getting snagged and ripping or breaking zipoers, etc.

I have always heard good things about Frog Togs....but any goretex or equivalent will be lighter and breath. Go to high end fishingvsites, Cabelas, Bass Pro, and the likes to see the selections of concepts, materials and styles. It almost boggles the mind.
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Old 04-04-2016, 07:04 AM   #7
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Traditional foul weather gear is hot, can't get away from it....

New sports gear is better, especially the high end stuff but it isn't very forgiving about getting snagged and ripping or breaking zipoers, etc.

I have always heard good things about Frog Togs....but any goretex or equivalent will be lighter and breath. Go to high end fishingvsites, Cabelas, Bass Pro, and the likes to see the selections of concepts, materials and styles. It almost boggles the mind.
My son rides a motorbike over the winter in the UK, and has tried every brand and type of wet weather gear .

These are the only type that are 100% wet proof, lightweight, breathable don't sweat; he even wears them on his mountain bike.

Alpinestars isTop quality manufacturer; I'm sure there available at your local m' bike shop, or on Amazon.


Alpinestars El Nino Suit - Black / Grey - FREE UK DELIVERY
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Old 04-04-2016, 09:34 AM   #8
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I recomend Grunden's as our friends in Thorne Bay Alaska that have been running a fishing/hunting lodge for several decades highly recomend them. These people know rain gear.

We had some lightweight stuff we got at REI and thought their opinion on rain gear would be worth hearing. They say Grunden's are the best they have found. Used them for many years. Most really good rain gear is like wearing a tarp. Walking is impared and sweating is profound. Helly Hanson is the name of the old type rain gear. You wear them awhile and even the rain gear stinks. Grunden's are lightweight and even the hunters don't tear them up in the woods. It's kinda like the new anchors and the old anchors. And you get what you pay for. We still have our REI stuff and they are good for using several times a year but for serious rain gear Grunden's seems the best. I got mine in the "Salmon" color and don't recomend it unless you need a bright color ... it's like they're illuminated from within.
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Old 04-04-2016, 09:44 AM   #9
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Grundens are a working mans suit. Heavy duty and hot. Favored by fishermen, but that makes the practical, not necessarily the best.

Similar to grundens but less expensive when I bought my set are Carharts.

In Temps exceeding 65 or so degees, any of the heavier suits like Grundens are miserable and actually make doing tasks harder from their weight and lack of "giving" in the right places.

Which is exactly what the OP doesn't want, heavy and hot.
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Old 04-04-2016, 10:55 AM   #10
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Menzies, I have to question why you need foulies at all? There is a huge difference between marine foul weather gear, as you used to wear, and what you may need now.

Instead of asking what marine foul weather gear to use, instead ask yourself what you wear if you were going to leave your apartment and go for a walk in the rain? What would you wear to watch a kids soccer game in the rain?

As you know, marine foul weather gear is designed to keep all the water out when you are sitting in a cockpit in a torrential rain while beating upwind with waves and spray coming over the high side. I don't see you and Sonas being in that situation.

If I am on the boat in foul weather, I wear foul weather gear. If I am watching my kid play soccer in the wind and rain, I wear lightweight rain pants and a decent rain jacket. Those you can buy at any sporting goods store or outdoor equipment store such as REI. I suggest just go shopping, try stuff on and buy what fits and is comfortable.
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Old 04-04-2016, 11:03 AM   #11
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All good points, and ones that we have discussed.

We plan on doing the Great Loop and, after that, the islands down to the ABCs and back.

So we could possibly meet enough difficult weather.

However I suspect that it's use, with the pilothouse, may be for short-term anchor and docking work, as well as doggie-to-shore work where the weather is inclement.

We have the lighter stuff now, but were thinking of having some "real stuff" in the closet just in case.

Maybe not required?
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Old 04-04-2016, 11:16 AM   #12
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As long as you are on the boat and there's a chance of a Noreaster or thunderstorms....you can be out in the worst of things...maybe not for days...but looping you will probably see both.


Have I worn mine in 4 roundtrips to FL back to NJ? Occasionally, and a lightweight pair would have been fine.


But at anytime on one of those trips something might have broken loose at the dock or came undone on the boat and being out in it for an hour might have existed. What kind of gear do you want then?


Had I anchored more, especially in thunderstormy weather...the chances of needing it might have skyrocketed ....either my own issues or others dragging, etc.
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Old 04-04-2016, 11:42 AM   #13
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But at anytime on one of those trips something might have broken loose at the dock or came undone on the boat and being out in it for an hour might have existed. What kind of gear do you want then?
True, but in those situations I likely would grab whatever was hanging on the hook handy and head out on deck. I probably wouldn't go below, and dig out the foulies from behind whatever was packed in front of them in the locker, pulled on the overalls, and then jacket, located my deck boots and only then headed out to deal with the situation.

Again, I have no experience outside of sailing, but I am trying to imagine what would be the best use of what is always limited storage space on a boat. I have great foul weather gear, but don't plan on putting it on board my new boat.
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Old 04-04-2016, 12:23 PM   #14
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Grundens are a working mans suit. Heavy duty and hot. Favored by fishermen, but that makes the practical, not necessarily the best.

Similar to grundens but less expensive when I bought my set are Carharts.

In Temps exceeding 65 or so degees, any of the heavier suits like Grundens are miserable and actually make doing tasks harder from their weight and lack of "giving" in the right places.
In Alaska of course we consider Grunden's as lightweight.
Which is exactly what the OP doesn't want, heavy and hot.
psneeld,
You are right.
I misread the OP and thought he was headed for Ireland.
I haven't worn my Grunden's much here as I find I like wool (light or heavy depending on the temp) better.
I wouldn't wear Grunden's on the loop either.
Good call ... I'd be really sorry if the OP actually bought Grunden's on my reco.
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Old 04-04-2016, 12:51 PM   #15
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True, but in those situations I likely would grab whatever was hanging on the hook handy and head out on deck. I probably wouldn't go below, and dig out the foulies from behind whatever was packed in front of them in the locker, pulled on the overalls, and then jacket, located my deck boots and only then headed out to deal with the situation.

Again, I have no experience outside of sailing, but I am trying to imagine what would be the best use of what is always limited storage space on a boat. I have great foul weather gear, but don't plan on putting it on board my new boat.
I have been working and living on boats and docks pretty much since the 80's.

Running out to snug up on a line is one thing...heck often I just throw anything on...but when a boat breaks loose in a marina...it can be hours before several people get it under control. It's those times it is nice to be comfy as it can happen again in a few hours...then again and again all night.

If you think the marina handles situations like that....good luck...maybe during working hours...and how many hours out of a week is that for many places?

When looping, you may find you are not deep storing your foulies....and realistically, depending on where you might be on a loop per season, most will bring heavy foulies and float coats (like I do) as temps can swing quite a bit. Wrightsville Beach North Carolina tomorrow is a high of 58 and low of 39. Rain rolls through pretty much every 4-7 days this time of year. Often violent cold fronts with severe thunderstorms and tornado watches.
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Old 04-04-2016, 01:04 PM   #16
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In CA, it doesn't rain much, but when it does, it's relatively warm. I found a couple brands that help in the "dry, but not too hot" category.

I have a set of Frogg Toggs onboard and have used them often, but they are VERY lightweight and susceptible to tearing. Very comfortable to wear though. So far, they have served me well.

In the more durable department, I have a pair of Columbia bibs in bright red that are just the right weight for the job...not too heavy and hot, strong, durable and stain resistant. I wear them while cleaning sturgeon which can be a messy job. They always clean up beautifully.

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Old 04-04-2016, 01:49 PM   #17
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All good points, and ones that we have discussed.

We plan on doing the Great Loop and, after that, the islands down to the ABCs and back.

So we could possibly meet enough difficult weather.

However I suspect that it's use, with the pilothouse, may be for short-term anchor and docking work, as well as doggie-to-shore work where the weather is inclement.

We have the lighter stuff now, but were thinking of having some "real stuff" in the closet just in case.

Maybe not required?
I like the light weight Columbia stuff.
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Old 04-04-2016, 02:31 PM   #18
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I like the Frabill gear myself. Its pretty lightweight and has been durable so far.

http://www.amazon.com/Frabill-Surge-...ilpage_o00_s00
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Old 04-04-2016, 03:49 PM   #19
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I don't like rubber rain gear. As others have mentioned, it gets hot inside. I end up just as wet from sweat as if I'd been if I was wearing no rain gear.

I also don't like having multiple sets of rain gear on board. The same gear needs to work in the dinghy, the kayak, or hiking ashore. I've been using Arcteryx and Patagonia rain gear for years when skiing/backpacking/etc. and use their stuff on the boat with good results. Spendy, but long lasting, breathable, and very water resistant in my experience. My current gear is about 10 years old and made from Gore-Tex XCR fabric, which has proven to be very durable.

The newer ultralight fabrics often sacrifice durability for light weight. Important for certain activities, but not a good compromise for boating IMHO.
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Old 04-04-2016, 09:57 PM   #20
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All good points, and ones that we have discussed.

We plan on doing the Great Loop and, after that, the islands down to the ABCs and back.

So we could possibly meet enough difficult weather.

However I suspect that it's use, with the pilothouse, may be for short-term anchor and docking work, as well as doggie-to-shore work where the weather is inclement.

We have the lighter stuff now, but were thinking of having some "real stuff" in the closet just in case.

Maybe not required?
We have been using a mid-grade Frogg Togg product for exactly the use you describe. I have worn it all, from the PVC to the Gore-Tex to Mustang Survival. It's certainly in the "lighter stuff" category. We also stay in the (little) pilothouse unless docking or emptying the Pug during rain.

If it's in the 40's or less and windy, we wear Mustang Survival parkas with floatation. It's used if there is a chance of going overboard, and kept aboard for abandon-boat gear as needed. This stuff is way too warm for the places you are headed, except the Great Lakes before June 1 (cold water).

We use the Frogg Toggs for everything else. They are a good price for the useful life we are seeing, they breathe well, they are light on the body, and they dry fast. We have separate pants/jackets with hoods. I have owned them for 13 years of light use, and I am on my second set.

I have a West Marine jacket (sale/impulse purchase) that I mostly wear ashore. It does a great job keeping water out and has high-visibility features that I appreciate around parking lots and such. It is heavier, does not breathe as well, and does not dry as fast as the FT.

Good Luck
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