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Old 07-04-2015, 03:14 PM   #21
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Sure to be the next 'must have' toy for the mega yacht crowd.

LOL, yeah I can see it now. Daddy everyone else has one except for us they're only $$$$, daddy please! Still waiting on the water slide, then maybe a boom boat!
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Old 07-04-2015, 07:00 PM   #22
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Just to clarify a couple of things about boom boats in general. In BC, Washington, Oregon, and Alaska there are two basic types of boom boat in current use.

The first is the boat in the picture below. It's commonly called a Sidewinder, often shortened to "Winder". These are 15'-18' long and have the engine aft, the operator sits in the bow with the hydrostatic 360-degree drive directly under him. Underwater these boats have a flat bottom with a huge keel aft, with the prop in a cage under the bow. They do most of their work with the bow teeth, hooking logs and pushing. The hydrostatic drive allows full thrust in any direction instantly without ever shifting gears.

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The second type is called a Dozer Boat, or just a Dozer. Picture below. It has the engine forward and a fixed propeller aft. In this case it is equiped with a steering nozzle, but these boats are intended for more towing and are not as maneuverable as the Winder. The problem with the winder is that it will not go in a straight line for more than 2 secs, so is really troublesome to tow with.

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Old 07-04-2015, 07:11 PM   #23
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Thanks for the explanation Tad. I'd found a dozer style for sale out of BC a year or so ago and thought it would be neat to own. The huge Detroit engine in that tiny boat made me think again and I passed.

It'd definitely turn heads.
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Old 07-04-2015, 07:15 PM   #24
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They are amazing to watch as they do their work. We've seen them several times at the Crofton Mill on our way up to Nanaimo. They are indeed fast and good at what they do! Thanks for the more in depth info on them.

There are a couple of them on display in Madeira Park near the grocery store on the mainland side of the Strait.
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Old 07-04-2015, 07:58 PM   #25
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Rick Mercer fooling around in a Sidewinder in the second part of this.....

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Old 07-04-2015, 08:41 PM   #26
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Rick Mercer fooling around in a Sidewinder in the second part of this.....
Helicopter logging.....learn something new everyday. Thanks for posting it Tad.

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Old 07-05-2015, 08:55 AM   #27
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Fast? Are they exceeding hull speed without planing?
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Old 07-05-2015, 09:31 AM   #28
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To Marin and others who contributed, thank you for the enlightenment about something I never even knew existed. It's a fascinating view of man/machine interface. This must be one heck of a dangerous workplace. Thanks, Howard
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Old 07-05-2015, 12:17 PM   #29
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Fast? Are they exceeding hull speed without planing?
No. They are fast relative to the kind of work they are doing. Instead of creeping timidly around the logs as a recreational toy boat driver would do they run around pushing and bashing into things as fast as their boats will go.
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Old 07-05-2015, 01:49 PM   #30
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It's a fascinating view of man/machine interface.
I have been fascinated by logging ever since coming across a book in the Honolulu library when I was a little kid called Railroads in the Woods. The year before I moved to the PNW I had visited a friend in southwest Virginia, then flown to Toronto to try to persuade the CBC to hire me, ridden the CP train across Canada, much of the trip in the cab of the locomotive, and rented a car in Vancouver to drive down the coast to visit my mother who lived in Carmel at the time.

While driving on 101 around the Olympic Penninsula I stopped at a roadside store to ask the counter person if she knew if there were any nearby logging operations I could get close to to take pictures. A fellow in the store heard me and said he'd be happy to show me some. As we walked out of the store he asked me if I has a car. I said yes, and he told me to leave it at the store and ride with him. His "ride" tuned out to be a Peterbilt tractor with a Roadrunner logging trailer and 70,000 pounds of logs he was taking to a sort yard near Port Angeles.

I spent the next four days riding with Pat. He and his family live in Forks and he got me a room in a motel that had a trailer I could stay in as everything else in town was full due to the upcoming Fourth of July weekend. He was working a logging side (not site) deep in the mountains and while his truck was being loaded I watched the trees being cut and limbed and yarded up to the tower skidder. Then we'd race down the mountain, sometimes hitting 60 mph on the dirt logging roads, to 101 and the drive north to Port Angeles, unload, and do it again.

All the while Pat was telling me about logging and how log trucks worked. His father had been a log truck driver and Pat had grown up in logging. I had asked him why, as we barreled around curves on 101 with the cab just a few feet away from the cliffs next to the road, the trailer and logs never hit the cliffs. He explained that and everything else about the truck. He even let me drive it, empty with the trailer stacked on the tractor, on the highway and part of the way back up into the mountains.

if I hadn't been fascinated with logging by before I was after that experience. Since moving here I've toured mills, ridden a log train (the only one that's left), and talked to loggers and retired loggers, captains of tugs that haul log rafts and self-loading barges along the BC coast, pilots who fly for logging companies and even a couple of logging company owners.

I find it an absolutely amazing industry, in the machines that are used and the people who use them. I'm sure I would find the mining and oil and steel industries equally fascinating but I don't live where these industries are.

I feel very fortunate in getting to know, at least a little bit, the people responsible for the wood our house is made of.
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Old 07-10-2015, 01:40 AM   #31
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Thank you Marin.

I have had the opportunity to watch close at hand some of these operations and it is fascinating. A friends [he was a logger and log truck driver] brother owns a small logging show in Clio Channel, near Minstrel. It's nowhere near the size of the operation at Beaver Cove.

We were lucky enough to stay with them for 5 days. Watched the truck loading/unloading, the bundling, the bundles sliding down the skids and setting the house barge rocking and rolling.

The sidewinder then pushed the bundle out to the storage area and pushed the logs from a broken bundle or two back to shore so the logs could be picked up for rebundling.

When we arrived the sidewinder was used to open a channel for us to get our boats to the barge. Once we were in there was no out untill the tug showed up.

One day we watched the boom being put together for towing to market. We awoke at 05:00 and the tug was waiting for us lazy folk to get moving. They had come in in the dark, tied up and had coffee while waiting for us.
The tug and sidewinder assembled the tow and off went the tug.

The whole setup was fascinating.

I used to see these boats assembling flat rafts all over my cruising area. Now, as you point out, the sorting and bundling is almost always done on land and the winders simply push/tow the bundles into storage.

I've seen the Dozer boats moving rafts of logs to storage areas untill the larger tugs arrive with their orders.

Tad,

thank you also as I did not know the difference between a Sidewinder and a Dozer boat even though I'd heard the terms many times. Makes sense, that terrific manouverability comes at a cost on tracking manouvers.
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Old 08-17-2017, 07:28 PM   #32
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Can anyone help with blueprints or 'technical' drawings of these fascinating boats?

Thanks
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Old 08-17-2017, 08:10 PM   #33
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Greetings,
Welcome aboard.
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Old 08-17-2017, 09:01 PM   #34
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Can anyone help with blueprints or 'technical' drawings of these fascinating boats?
Well, you could always have one built:
http://alberni-cae.com/Services/Custom_Boat_Building

Or, just buy one:
https://www.harlowmarine.com/shop/boom-boats-equipment/bv255/

http://www.supplypost.com/dealers/forestech-equipment?ps=1&p=1&f_model_s=18%27+Pod+Dozer+Boat

http://www.tugsrus.com/13__dozer_tug_1_3_grt.htm

http://www.tugsrus.com/16__dozer_tug_1_8_grt.htm

http://www.guysboats.com/578/20-steel-boom-boat-for-sale/

Grab one, measure it all up and resell it.
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