"The "average" boat in the Sea of Cortez"

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slowgoesit

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Kevin, I've reposted what I had of the thread you started: "The "average" boat in the Sea of Cortez" by ksanders,

The thread was a good one, but was lost in the server crash of yesterday.

These following posts were made to the thread:

The "average" boat in the Sea of Cortez

Posted by: ksanders

On: 04-08-2023 10:14 AM

What kind of boat is the "average" boat in the Sea of Cortez?

Why is it even important?

Here's why. People planning on exploring by water tend to over plan their needs in a boat. Why??? Because they do not know what they need and they make assumptions about what a real cruising boat is, and they overestimate their needs. This can cause them to honestly never go cruising because they think it is out of their reach.

So... Lets talk about the "average" boat in the Sea of Cortez. Why here???Because every boat here made it safely down the 900 mile Baja Pensulia with zero services and few places to shelter.

First lets eliminate sail boats, because they are far and away the most popular boat here. Lets think about power boats.

Here in the anchorage this morning there are...

A Bayliner 4788 (mine)

A sport fishing boat around 40-45 feet

A italian style crusier around 55 feet

A KK42 (owned by a friend)

A Krogen express (a semi displacement big engine Krogen)

Now lets think about the power boats in Marina De La Paz where I call home.

Several 40-45' aft cabin cruisers of various makes. (they are VERY popular)

Several 40-60' sport fishers

Several 40-60' cruiser style yachts

A flemming of around 60'

Domino, a georgous power cat of around 65'

A couple Nordhavn's in the 60' range

A really cool wooden boat from I think ireland but not sure

So... you get the picture

*The average boat here in the Sea of Cortez is in reality your boat.*

So... you think wow, but what about the Baja Bash coming back North????

Well, my good friend Doug just made it to Santa Barbara California having left La Paz two weeks ago in his 30' Willard. If he can do it, so can you.

************


Posted by: Ken E.

On: 04-08-2023 10:25 AM

Kevin, have you gone through the hot season yet?I'm wondering if the usual mode is to run AC nearly all the time, or can you anchor in shady spots for part of the day and get much sea breeze cooling? Also, describe hurricane season down there and what cruisers like you do to prepare for it.

Posted by: mvweebles

On: 04-08-2023 10:26 AM

Kevin - are you hearing any feedback from folks who did the Baja Ha Ha? My wife and I are considering doing it this year as a stake-in-the-calander for absolute cast off. We did it in 2006 on a friend's boat and annoyed it, though being a powerboat is a bit of a red-headed stepchild. CUBAR is too far the other direction for us. My wife has some trepidations since it's been so long since we've cruised distances. Seems like a good entree without burden of taking additional crew.

Appreciate any second had feedback you can relay.

Peter

Posted by: ksanders

On: 04-08-2023 10:59 AM

---Quote (Originally by Ken E.)---

Kevin, have you gone through the hot season yet?I'm wondering if the usual mode is to run AC nearly all the time, or can you anchor in shady spots for part of the day and get much sea breeze cooling? Also, describe hurricane season down there and what cruisers like you do to prepare for it.

---End Quote---

Yes, I was here all last summer but not on my boat. It gets HOT here. The hottest time is August and September.

The typical day is in the low 70's when you wake up. Then by noon it's HOT!!! By 6:00 or so the sun has lowered in the horizon enough that it cools off again.

Daytime you will need AC on the boat. Even with breezes it's still going to be well into the 110's on your boat. Unbearable.

We are planning on taking the boat back north in early July and then come back in October. I love Marina Cortez in Ensenada and the heat and hurricane risk is enough of an excuse to go on an adventure. We will keep our slip in Marina La Paz, and they will sub lease it, splitting the rental income 50/50, which is very nice.

As far as hurricanes go, no place is completely safe of course. That said Marina La Paz has spent a ton of money in breakwaters to mitigate the risk. The marina is also full for summer, which says a lot for the confidence of the local cruising community.

Posted by: ksanders

On: 04-08-2023 11:04 AM

---Quote (Originally by mvweebles)---

Kevin - are you hearing any feedback from folks who did the Baja Ha Ha? My wife and I are considering doing it this year as a stake-in-the-calander for absolute cast off. We did it in 2006 on a friend's boat and annoyed it, though being a powerboat is a bit of a red-headed stepchild. CUBAR is too far the other direction for us. My wife has some trepidations since it's been so long since we've cruised distances. Seems like a good entree without burden of taking additional crew.

Appreciate any second had feedback you can relay.

Peter

---End Quote---

I have not heard anything. In reality when we left last November there were several other cruisers in every anchorage we stayed in.

I would recommend you maybe buddy boat with someone for fun and company. We will be going north to Ensenada in early July, and coming back south in October if that works for your plans, we would be happy to go together.

Posted by: SteveK

On: 04-08-2023 12:21 PM

Average 40-60. That suggests there are an equal number over 60 and under 40.

Care to guess on percentages of the three groups to better put into perspective.




Posted by: O C Diver

On: 04-08-2023 01:30 PM

---Quote (Originally by ksanders)---

So... Lets talk about the "average" boat in the Sea of Cortez. Why here???Because every boat here made it safely down the 900 mile Baja Pensulia with zero services and few places to shelter.

---End Quote---

Actually that's only mostly true. When I looked at buying a 40' Willard (Aloha), my plan was to truck it from the Sea of Cortez. Was able to find trucking companies that would haul out of Guaymas and Puerto penasco across to Tucson. I'm sure it works the other way.

Ted


Posted by: ksanders

On: 04-08-2023 02:13 PM

---Quote (Originally by SteveK)---

Average 40-60. That suggests there are an equal number over 60 and under 40.

Care to guess on percentages of the three groups to better put into perspective.

---End Quote---

Not many under 40' power boats, but a lot of 40-60 footers. A lot of 40-50 footers as well.

Yes there are a fair number of really large power boats as well, in the 60-100 foot class.


Posted by: Airstream345

On: 04-08-2023 02:44 PM

Great post and reminder that average people can do this on average boats. Thanks Kevin.


Posted by: Simi 60

On: 04-08-2023 03:09 PM

Time is what you need.

If you insist on travelling to a schedule you either need a big, well prepared vessel or enjoy getting your arse kicked.

Out at the reef a week or so ago, a boat turned up bleating about their rough passage out but had a schedule to keep to meet people at the next port.

We left two days later when it was a glassout.



Posted by: heysteve

On: 04-08-2023 07:56 PM

This will be our fourth summer down hear in Mexico. The Covid summer was spent at Marina Mazatlan and the rest at Marina de La Paz. We pretty much turn into vampires from early July to the end of September as we don't go out in daylight. The town goes into a long siesta every day but comes alive as the sun sets. The Mexicans have it figured out.

We leave our boat in the water as I think it's easier on it due to the mitigating effect of the water. Boats on the hard all summer need to be sealed up to prevent the ubiquitous dust from getting in so you can imagine the inside temperatures.

We run the aircon a lot in the summer and it keeps the boat nice and cool. We also try to cover as much of the boat as possible with awnings to keep the sun off the deck as it really helps everything cool down in the evening if the boat itself hasn't absorbed so much energy.

We're in Marina Fonatur now which seems like it has great hurricane protection as there's almost no fetch in any direction. It also has cheap slip fees but it has low pressure non-potable water (city water) and the voltage likes to stay around 132. :) It's also WAY down the channel from all the other marinas but as we have a car it's fine for us.

I think the biggest hurricane in modern times to hit La Paz was Odile in 2014. I think it was a Cat 2 and a couple dozen boats were lost. I saw a video of Marina de La Paz during the storm and it was frightening... but also before all the new sea walls were installed so I'd imagine things would be much better now. The La Paz harbor area is large so depending on wind direction there can be miles of fetch affecting the marinas near downtown. However, I'd imagine the narrow, heavily shoaled entrance to the basin would also limit any potential storm surge. I suspect the big, fast yachts simply head far north into the sea whenever it looks dicey as storms tend to diminish in strength as they move north.



Posted by: Nomad Willy

On: 04-08-2023 08:25 PM

Informative post,

I have a hard time thinking of Kevin having a good time for over a week south of the border.

The heat would definitely keep me away. I was born in Juneau so probably didn’t see the sun til I was several months old.

Going to eastern Wash in the summer is something for me to avoid. But I did go to school in Ellensburg for three years.

Have fun guys … and make pictures.



Posted by: ksanders

On: 04-08-2023 08:40 PM

---Quote (Originally by heysteve)---

This will be our fourth summer down hear in Mexico. The Covid summer was spent at Marina Mazatlan and the rest at Marina de La Paz. We pretty much turn into vampires from early July to the end of September as we don't go out in daylight. The town goes into a long siesta every day but comes alive as the sun sets. The Mexicans have it figured out.

We leave our boat in the water as I think it's easier on it due to the mitigating effect of the water. Boats on the hard all summer need to be sealed up to prevent the ubiquitous dust from getting in so you can imagine the inside temperatures.

We run the aircon a lot in the summer and it keeps the boat nice and cool. We also try to cover as much of the boat as possible with awnings to keep the sun off the deck as it really helps everything cool down in the evening if the boat itself hasn't absorbed so much energy.

We're in Marina Fonatur now which seems like it has great hurricane protection as there's almost no fetch in any direction. It also has cheap slip fees but it has low pressure non-potable water (city water) and the voltage likes to stay around 132. :) It's also WAY down the channel from all the other marinas but as we have a car it's fine for us.

I think the biggest hurricane in modern times to hit La Paz was Odile in 2014. I think it was a Cat 2 and a couple dozen boats were lost. I saw a video of Marina de La Paz during the storm and it was frightening... but also before all the new sea walls were installed so I'd imagine things would be much better now. The La Paz harbor area is large so depending on wind direction there can be miles of fetch affecting the marinas near downtown. However, I'd imagine the narrow, heavily shoaled entrance to the basin would also limit any potential storm surge. I suspect the big, fast yachts simply head far north into the sea whenever it looks dicey as storms tend to diminish in strength as they move north.

---End Quote---

Please stop by and say hi! We are in slip B137, right at the end of the float at the marina entrance!
 
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Thanks!!!!! Server crash's are No fun!
ir house bank
Last night we spent the night in a georgous anchorage with friends.

This morning their inverter/charger stopped working and they are heading into port. We are heading north to Isla San Francisco and are hoping for a nice dorado along the way.

Our friends problem brings up a good topic of discussion, Redundancy.

Mexico is a wonderful country, but what it lacks is a good parts supply infrastructure. For example I would be shocked if you could get a new inverter/charger here in less than a couple of weeks.

Our friends are in a bit of a pickle. They cannot charge their house bank except using their engine alternator. So... even plugged into the dock their house bank needs a way to be charged.
 
Kevin - I didn't realize you had spent time in Mazatlan. It's on our list - thinking La Paz has become a bit gringo. But we dont have serious plans. Cheryll (my other half) and I were talking yesterday about spending a few months in the Sea of Cortez, then headed to Mazatlan or PV to leave the boat for a while. We've never been to either, and flights in/out seem easy.

Guessing that since you will retain your La Paz slip while you head to Ensenada over the summer that you are pretty happy there. Would be very interested in your feedback.

Hoping AKDoug will share highlights of his trip north with stops/anchorages. Whether he single-handed or had company.

Thanks for these threads - Peter
 
Kevin - I didn't realize you had spent time in Mazatlan. It's on our list - thinking La Paz has become a bit gringo. But we dont have serious plans. Cheryll (my other half) and I were talking yesterday about spending a few months in the Sea of Cortez, then headed to Mazatlan or PV to leave the boat for a while. We've never been to either, and flights in/out seem easy.

Guessing that since you will retain your La Paz slip while you head to Ensenada over the summer that you are pretty happy there. Would be very interested in your feedback.

Hoping AKDoug will share highlights of his trip north with stops/anchorages. Whether he single-handed or had company.

Thanks for these threads - Peter

I'm sorry, no I've never been to Mazatlan, but want to go...

Marian La Paz is far and away the most cruiser friendly marina in La Paz. The facilities are fantastic, and the friendly welcoming staff make it all the better.

Marina La Paz is full, and we have in my opinion the best slip in the marina. I would never dream of giving that up.
 
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