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Take Five

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2010
Messages
22
Location
Bahamas
Vessel Name
Take Five II
Vessel Make
Present 42
Hi,* just a FYI,* I have started to refinish my teak railings, decided to try the new "Cetol* Natural Teak"** I did not like the orange colour that the original Cetol gave,* but the Natural is looking very nice.
 

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I use the same and am happy with it, easy to apply and satin finish
Steve W.
 
Take Five wrote:
Hi,* just a FYI,* I have started to refinish my teak railings, decided to try the new "Cetol* Natural Teak"** I did not like the orange colour that the original Cetol gave,* but the Natural is looking very nice.
*I usually start out with one coat of the original Cetol and then the rest of the coats are all Cetol Light, for the same reason.* Easy to maintain and offers good protection.
 
motion30 wrote:
Cetol did not last long enough for me
*The first time we used the new Cetol, it didn't last for us either.* We then started all over agin and put 3 coats of Cetol "Gloss" on top of 3 coats of Ceto Light.* It lasted maybe 10+ months in the Mexican sun before we had to renew.* It seems that the "Gloss" has more UV protection in it.* There is*no perfect product but the new Cetols are easy to put on,*easy to*renew and pretty forgiving.
 
I use my own oil in Alaska so I never need to wood down and refinish. One usually dos'nt get phenolic resin and tung oil in a non gloss varnish. Re Cetol here in Alaska it's VERY popular and people put it on everything. I prefer my own oil or McKloskies gloss spar varnish or Interlux Schooner varnish. Both excellent products. I prefer a high tech precoat technique and a high quality low tech topcoat.

Pic is of my caprail w home made oil finish.

High Five, * How many coats have you got on there? Is it straight Cetol?







-- Edited by nomadwilly on Tuesday 22nd of November 2011 11:54:17 AM
 

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I have 4 coats of Cetol Natural, rubbed after each coat coat with a green 3m scrub pad, and then 2 coats of the Cetol Clear.**** I plan to scrub with the pad at the end of May or early June and apply one coat of clear, ready for the summer.

Regards

Graham
 
FWIW we have used Bristol on all the exterior teak on our boat. In the places where we've had the time to apply eight to ten coats we generally can go as long as six years without having to add another finish coat. A few years ago we took a shipwright's advice on the Grand Banks owners forum and have started putting a couple of coats of CPES on bare wood before applying the Bristol, and then applying the first coat of Bristol while the CPES is still a bit tacky. On some of the cabin trim strips where we applied the CPES but the weather and my scheduled to conspired to give us time for only one or two coats of Bristol after the CPES, the Bristol lasted for two years in the weather with no sign of deterioration. Not that we want to do this--- our minimum number of finish coats is eight if we can get that many on. But I was impressed to see how well just a one or two coats of finish held up with a CPES coating on the bare wood first. The CPES base process will not work on wood that already has a finish on it, by the way. It is for use on bare wood only.


-- Edited by Marin on Tuesday 22nd of November 2011 01:46:22 PM
 
Of course, where Marin lives one does not need UV protection :)
Bill
 
Take Five wrote:
I have 4 coats of Cetol Natural, rubbed after each coat coat with a green 3m scrub pad, and then 2 coats of the Cetol Clear.**** I plan to scrub with the pad at the end of May or early June and apply one coat of clear, ready for the summer.

Regards

Graham
There is no need for sanding or scrubbling between coats as long as the next coat is applied within 24 hours. The Natural without the Gloss over it does not last long. But with the gloss we only need to apply a maintenance coat once a year and that is here in south Florida. Our standard practice is three coats of natural and three coats of gloss. Lots of photos on our Beach House site. We have been using Cetol for years now after trying about every other finish. We will never use anything else and Beach House has lots of teak. Chuck
 
Yes, I'm a Cetol Man as well. - Just once or twice a year is all it needs, after a very quick light sand & wipe down. I don't apply anything over the top though. Chuck are you saying you apply a clear varnish over the top of the Cetol natural.? If so what type of clear do you use.? Or does Cetol now have a clear varnish type of finish coat out now I have not heard of...?
 
bnoft wrote:
Of course, where Marin lives one does not need UV protection :)
Bill
That would be true if UV did not penetrate cloud cover.** Unfortunately, it does.* Also, Bristol has more UV protection than any of the other finishes we have either tried or looked in to.
 
Peter B wrote:
*...*are you saying you apply a clear varnish over the top of the Cetol natural.? If so what type of clear do you use.? Or does Cetol now have a clear varnish type of finish coat out now I have not heard of...?
*

Peter

I think Sikkens is still making just the four types of Cetol for marine use.* Cetol gloss is the Clear finish product,*the other three are described as being translucent.* I've never tried the gloss, but Cetol is definately*the best product on the market that I have seen.

Larry B*


-- Edited by Edelweiss on Wednesday 23rd of November 2011 09:04:39 PM
 
I think all the products are good. It's the applicators that are frequently bad. That is .....bad preparations, no preparations or applications beyond the range of suitability for the product. Painting and clear coating is not rocket science nor is it witchcraft. Actually house paint is frequently more durable than marine finishes ....but it dos'nt have the wet look of a high gloss marine coating. Cetol is beyond a doubt very popular but I'm not convinced it's better than most other products formulated for the same purpose. In the 60s Chevrolet said in ads "x million people can't be wrong" but the people that bought Fords and Plymouth's were probably equally happy.
 
Like Marin I use Bristol Finish on my outside teak.* The last time it was coated was in August of '07.* 9 coats in 2 days time.* It still looks good, but I will probably do about 3 maintenance coats in the next few months.* That should take 1 day to mask off and buff over with a Scotchbrite pad and 1 day for putting on the finish.* It is the best system that I have used.* The boat has spent time in Maryland, South Carolina, and Florida.* I have used sikens, teak oil, Cetal, and a number of other finishes over the years.* By far the best results and looks have come with using Bristol.* It looks and shines like varnish.* The photos were made within the last couple of months.



-- Edited by Moonstruck on Wednesday 23rd of November 2011 09:45:54 PM


-- Edited by Moonstruck on Wednesday 23rd of November 2011 09:54:47 PM
 

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Forgive my ignorance, but in the second picture showing the power cords is that a custom made cord lifter or is it off the shelf? Wife and I have toured many marinas lately and have not seen anything quite so clean for the purpose.
Moonstruck wrote:
Like Marin I use Bristol Finish on my outside teak.* The last time it was coated was in August of '07.* 9 coats in 2 days time.* It still looks good, but I will probably do about 3 maintenance coats in the next few months.* That should take 1 day to mask off and buff over with a Scotchbrite pad and 1 day for putting on the finish.* It is the best system that I have used.* The boat has spent time in Maryland, South Carolina, and Florida.* I have used sikens, teak oil, Cetal, and a number of other finishes over the years.* By far the best results and looks have come with using Bristol.* It looks and shines like varnish.* The photos were made within the last couple of months.



-- Edited by Moonstruck on Wednesday 23rd of November 2011 09:45:54 PM



-- Edited by Moonstruck on Wednesday 23rd of November 2011 09:54:47 PM
*
 
I find that the Cetol does not flow out like a vanish, so on areas like a hand rail or grab rail I find that a light rub with the pad gives a nicer feel to the finish. but thats just me.*** You and I have about the same climate conditions, so I hope to only have to do a maintenance coat once a year, once I get on top of it.* The PO let it go pretty bad.

Graham
 
Take Five wrote:
Capn Chuck,

I find that the Cetol does not flow out like a vanish, so on areas like a hand rail or grab rail I find that a light rub with the pad gives a nicer feel to the finish. but thats just me.*** You and I have about the same climate conditions, so I hope to only have to do a maintenance coat once a year, once I get on top of it.* The PO let it go pretty bad.

Graham
*


-- Edited by Take Five on Thursday 24th of November 2011 07:46:19 AM
 
CPseudonym wrote:Forgive my ignorance, but in the second picture showing the power cords is that a custom made cord lifter or is it off the shelf? Wife and I have toured many marinas lately and have not seen anything quite so clean for the purpose.
*Nothing to forgive.* It is a stock stainless steel boarding assist handle that is curved at the end to fit in a rod holder.* You can also get a stock, shorter chord holder that rod holder mounts.* I use te longer handle to keep the chords off the teak covering boards.* We sue it for both especially when we are at a dock where we can't use the convenient transom gate.

*
 
Moonstruck wrote:CPseudonym wrote:Forgive my ignorance, but in the second picture showing the power cords is that a custom made cord lifter or is it off the shelf? Wife and I have toured many marinas lately and have not seen anything quite so clean for the purpose.
*Nothing to forgive.* It is a stock stainless steel boarding assist handle that is curved at the end to fit in a rod holder.* You can also get a stock, shorter chord holder that rod holder mounts.* I use te longer handle to keep the chords off the teak covering boards.* We sue it for both especially when we are at a dock where we can't use the convenient transom gate.

*

*I will definitely put that item on my shopping list. If I cannot locate one locally I'll PM you later for a link. Very classy.*
 
I tried store bought teak oil *....SEA-FIN .....a Dalys product. Daly products in general are VERY good but the SEA-FIN turned black fairly quickly and it had enough build it required stripping off. That's when I started mixing my own oil. Linseed oil is known to be "mildew food" so I incorporated some things in it to fight the black mould and it seems to work. I would'nt recommend my oil for warm climates as it is a bit tacky for a week to a month after it's applied. In time you can sit on it but it never looses all of it's tackiness. Could be a really really good base for an oil based gloss varnish. So far for me I've not had any build, almost no blackness at all and my teak is thoroughly protected and looks great from a distance and good rather close and beads up water really well. For my extremely wet and cool climate I ca'nt imagine a better teak finish.
 
CPseudonym wrote:Moonstruck wrote:
Like Marin I use Bristol Finish on my outside teak.* The last time it was coated was in August of '07.* 9 coats in 2 days time.* It still looks good, but I will probably do about 3 maintenance coats in the next few months.



-- Edited by Moonstruck on Wednesday 23rd of November 2011 09:45:54 PM



-- Edited by Moonstruck on Wednesday 23rd of November 2011 09:54:47 PM
*I`m trying 2 products.

1. Cetol Gloss which is lasting much longer on exposed teak work than usual polyurethane varnishes.

2. A product called "Deks Olje"(Olje pronounced Olya), sounds a bit like "Bristol" described by others.

It has 2 parts:

No.1 is an oil, you saturate the wood over about 5 hours,coat after coat,until you wipe off what is no longer being absorbed. You can leave it like that,as an oiled finish, and apply a maintenance coat every 3 months or so. Non slippery,it can be used where you walk.

No.2 is a clear gloss product,you apply 5 coats over 5 days over the oil. Looks much like varnish when complete.If you started by sanding back you get a nice natural gloss showing the wood features; if you don`t sand back you just get a dark varnished look,no real grain showing.I have some fully sanded,some not. Full sanding is best.

The makers say you should almost never have to go back to bare wood to maintain it. No.2 reapplied revives the gloss finish,even a recoat of no.1 over old no.2 seems to do that too. Early days, but the makers promise it can be revived and maintained seem true.

Available in USA? Don`t know. Sounds Scandanavian, but it`s made here in Australia,maybe under license.

BruceK IG36 Australia

*

*
 
I can't say enough good about Honey Teak. Polyurethyane, durable, leaves a beautiful finish. Been using it for 10 years on* my Krogen. http://www.fabulainc.com/
 
Bruce Kops wrote:
*2. A product called "Deks Olje"(Olje pronounced Olya), sounds a bit like "Bristol" described by others.

Available in USA? Don`t know. Sounds Scandanavian, but it`s made here in Australia, maybe under license.

BruceK IG36 Australia

*
"Deks Olje" products have been marketed in*the U.S. for a long time.* We have a couple*of old cans of their cleaner and teak finish in our paint locker.* I think my dad must have bought it many years ago.*I don't know if they have changed their product over the years or if it is the same. We did the same as you, tested many products*summer after summer, with less than stellar results.*

Until Cetol came along we spent most springs sanding down and refinishing the teak rails.* In this case the sun is your enemy.*

I think you will be happy with the Cetol results, however by experience you will find the proper method for installing and re-coating*that works best for you.*The number of coats varies.* The manufactures*directions suggest that more coats are better, but there is a limit to that advice.**Most Cetol users here*have suggested*a light sanding before*applying a maintenance re-coat each year*and that has been my experience too.

Be sure and lift your rail stancions and treat the wood beneath them as well.* Moisture will cause the finish to lift.

ps* "Dekk Olje" is*Norwegian*for*"deck oil", so*maybe there is something there in the name?*
smile.gif
*


-- Edited by Edelweiss on Sunday 27th of November 2011 10:06:28 AM
 
I can't agree with Keith more. Honey Teak*is an outstanding product. We have been using it for about 8 years also, on our teak hand and cap rails. Once the base coats of the UV resistant Honey are applied, you can apply as many coats of the clear topcoat as necessary, or wanted. The good news about this product is that you can apply subsequent coats as soon as the previous coat solidifies. No sanding between coats. Also, when we overcoat (only once per year) with the clear, we just rough up the surface with a red Scotchbrite pad, then apply. We suspend the brushes in a jar of the solvent fluid and have been re-using them for 8 years! This finish is the best of the many we have tried, and holds up very well in the Mexican sun and humidity.

*

*

*

*
 
Keith wrote:
I can't say enough good about Honey Teak. Polyurethyane, durable, leaves a beautiful finish. Been using it for 10 years on* my Krogen. http://www.fabulainc.com/
*Thanks Keith and BahaTrawler,

Followed the link,Honey Teak sounds good,not seen it here (and I`m a chandlery catalogue addict), will watch for it.

Cetol (8 coats),18months old on a teak grating in full sun looks good and shipwright scratching the Deks Olje was easily restored.

Products like these improve the balance* between maintenance and usage; though maintenance with results, is itself a reward.

BruceK
 
You can only buy Honey Teak direct from Fabula. They don't have any distributors nor do they sell through any of the big box stores. Tom is very helpful and a great guy to work with.
 
Tried Deks Olje several boats ago. Always looked like it was time for a new coat. Way more work than varnish, never the nice look.
 
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