Teak Deck Issue

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firstbase

Guru
Joined
Nov 6, 2016
Messages
1,644
Location
United States
Vessel Name
Black Eyed Susan
Vessel Make
Grand Banks 42' Classic
1987 GB 42C, 35 years old with original teak decks. What could go wrong?!?! Well, this, pics. Doing some maintenance today on varnish, a few bung replacements, and I come across two areas where the deck caulking is oozing out (plastic is to cover them overnight while I decide where to go). While I am on the boat a plank springs at one end. It was not sprung when I arrived. I guess it waited for me as a surprise. The two oozing area are separated as shown in the pics. Teak decks are in pretty good shape with the exception of some bung replacements being needed. Nt paper thin although I can tell they have been sanded in the past by PO's.

Any comments on the "why's" of these issues as well as comments on where to start fixing. Take up the sprung plank to see what is underneath would seem to be a first step. And hope for the best I guess!

Apologies for the pic rotations. One day I will figure that function out.
 

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Thanks. I am familiar with replacing/repairing the caulking. I just haven't experienced caulk turning to goo. We haven't spilled anything in these areas, no acetone or other liquids that might affect the caulk. Just wondering what causes it or is it just something that can happen as the caulking ages? My biggest concern is the plank popping up in the same area. Hopefully, that isn't a hint at something more major underneath. There aren't any noticeable soft spots in the deck although I didn't sound the area with a mallet yet. Will be doing that tomorrow.
 
The plank sprung most likely because the screw has broken. You'll need to dig out the bung and you'll probably find a separated screw head. You can try and get out the bottom of the screw from the deck but that rarely worked for me. The "correct" way to fix is to remove the rest of the screws holding the plank and pull the plank. Clean out the old caulk and bed it back down with new caulk and re-screw. The duffer's fix is to just replace the screw. One takes 2 mornings the other a few minutes. Depends on what else you have on your plate for the day.


The oozing caulk is unusual. I've only had caulk ooze out from under fittings never the deck caulk. That usually drys out, cracks and vanishes. I'll bet it's replacement caulk from a previous owner. I'd reeve it out and replace with the good stuff like TDK.
 
The plank sprung most likely because the screw has broken. You'll need to dig out the bung and you'll probably find a separated screw head. You can try and get out the bottom of the screw from the deck but that rarely worked for me
The oozing caulk is unusual. I'll bet it's replacement caulk from a previous owner. I'd reeve it out and replace with the good stuff like TDK.

I used 1/4" diamond coated hole saw, normally used to drill through tile. Once bung is removed drill straight down through fiberglass into core. Remove plug. Fill hole with G10 epoxy, redrill hole, refasten plank. Hole saws are in various diameters to match screw size.

I agree with removing oozing caulk and replacing with TDK SIS 440.
 
Appreciate the comments. As you can tell, I generally freak when there is something going on with the decks. Brought about by their age coupled with my lack of experience with rehabbing teak decks. I know the PO did some seam work in several areas but the boat came with a Teakdecking Systems kit that he put together along with several tubes of the SIS caulk (now expired). Who knows what went on prior to him buying the boat in 2014. Anyway, going to look closer today. Thanks for putting up with me. :)
 
LOL !
That looks like my deck.
Get ready for some fun. Its just time to re caulk the deck. Its some serious time. Remove the caulk , I had to route out all the joints with a router because there was no room/ groove left for the caulk. Then sand joints. and clean, install deck separator membrane, fill with caulk and trowel in. Will look like total ****. Then sand/grind flat. Will take time. You need good quality sanding equipment. You can make like new.

I have 7/ 10 hr days in labor in this so far. I still have my companion ways and the swim platform to do. Looking great though. Make sure you use the right caulking materials. I used a sikafex dc 90 pro that sanded well and did not clog the sander.

The popping area take a multi tool and cut out a piece of teak that is lifted and re set it to the deck, and re screw down. If not you will continue to "pop" the board with the expansion and contraction of the boards. The boards need to be bedded down or they will just tear the screws through the boards.

Check out Andy at Boatworkstoday.com he has great videos on this topic.
 

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1987 GB 42C, 35 years old with original teak decks. What could go wrong?!?! Well, this, pics. Doing some maintenance today on varnish, a few bung replacements, and I come across two areas where the deck caulking is oozing out (plastic is to cover them overnight while I decide where to go). While I am on the boat a plank springs at one end. It was not sprung when I arrived. I guess it waited for me as a surprise. The two oozing area are separated as shown in the pics. Teak decks are in pretty good shape with the exception of some bung replacements being needed. Nt paper thin although I can tell they have been sanded in the past by PO's.



Any comments on the "why's" of these issues as well as comments on where to start fixing. Take up the sprung plank to see what is underneath would seem to be a first step. And hope for the best I guess!



Apologies for the pic rotations. One day I will figure that function out.

That is one ugly and very compromised deck. Aside from fixing upturned individual planks, IMHO, I think your deck needs a complete rehab. This is how my deck looked after I removed all of the bad caulking, recaulked, and then sanded down to new wood. As in the Sika document shows, I had a number of spots where water was getting underneath the decking due to shrunken or missing caulk. My deck was not nearly as bad as yours. After recaulking, there was no more wet-spotting of teak.20210429_112717.jpg
 
Problem solved.
 

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The planks upturned at the end indicate to me that the underlayment has rot, it cant hold the screws.

The oozing caulk is probably a previous repair job using a cheap caulk.

Both are bad signs.

good luck,

pete
 
Apologies for the pic rotations. One day I will figure that function out.

I used to have this problem posting pictures to forums. Now I edit them to ‘square’. Seems to have solved the problem of rotated photos.
 
If you have an iPhone then take the photos with the camera in the up or to the top and the rotated photos will probably go away.
 
You have a job ahead of you. I have done that before. The way I did it was to remove all bad planking and check the support under it. If it is OK then plan on replanking the reseal.

Good luck :)
 
You are screwed. 35 years on a teak deck is pretty good.
The bad news is that no matter your best intentions, hopes, whatever, there is water between the fiberglass deck and the teak. That water is working its way in or out whatever way it can. Every warming and cooling cycle, it is trying to move. It is extremely likely that the water is penetrating the glass and into the core.
Keep a very sharp lookout for a couple days after your next heavy rain in the area of your fuel tank fills, look for any moisture on the tanks. This is very common on this age boat, especially with the teak deck.
Also look for areas of the deck that take longer to dry.
You can patch up the existing teak, but the underlying problem of water underneath will still be there, working.
Only way to save bigger issues down the road is to get rid of the teak, dry the core where need be, and finish off in Fiberglass., Paint and nonskid.
 

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Thanks for all the comments. I'm still working on it. The 35 years is attributed to her being a Great Lakes trawler for 26 of her 35 years. In a boat barn for 1/2 the year and then cruising around up there. in 2014 the PO bought her and did the loop and a trip to Bahamas. Then sold to me in 2017. I had a big time teak deck guy onboard to give me his thoughts and his reply was what I thought it would be, replace them, the only thing to do. $130,000. Then I had 2 others who work on decks and aren't focused on the big time replacement jobs. Neither found any soft spots and from what we could tell there is reasonable thickness left to work with. We pulled the screw from the end of the lifted board. It had gone through the bottom of the plank and was firmly in the deck. For the time being, I used some 5200 underneath and sistered the screw. It fastened strongly. However, I intend to pull up that plank and look at it more closely. I will add that the pictures I uploaded are the worst area of the deck. It is the port side where we enter and exit, on and off the dock, and gets much more wear than other areas. Seams are tight in most other areas.

All that being said, I'm not trying to fool myself. I know that the decks are end-of-life. Just trying to squeeze a couple more years out of them before ripping them up ad doing something else. In the mean time I am waiting on some supplies from TDS so I can deal with the most obvious seams and bungs.
 
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$130,000? That seems at least twice what I would have expected for the replacement of the teak decks.
 
That would be about 10 times more than I would pay for teak decks. I would much prefer painted fiberglass.
 
I've done several teak decks and repaired many more. New they look nice but a lot of care. On my own boats I have painted non-skid. Most plank decks leak. The boat builder just screws them down into whatever is underneath, fiberglass or core. Eventually they leak down the screw holes. Most builders use a good caulk, but it's only good for about 10 years. Cheaper black caulk can ooze out in hot weather.
If you really want teak decks you can read a book and watch videos. It goes fast until you get to the curved or out of square sections. When you drive the screws, put a few drops of epoxy down the screw holes. Epoxy holds to the fiberglass or wood better than the screw alone. And it usually solves the problems of leaks.
 
Teak Deck Systems will make you teak decks that you just glue down so no screws. You pattern the area and send it to them. I believe they will make sections up to 40’ long. Boatworks Today had a video where Andy used them for a sailboat decks.
 
My boat was a Europa giving some protection. I did side decks and cockpit in fresh teak and the bow in painted non slip on f/g. But even if yours is not Europa, your teak lasted 30+ years, depending on budget and aesthetics, fresh teak isn`t out of the question. Most mfrs seem not to use teak fwd these days.
Pre fabricating,as Comodave suggests, would lower cost and install time.
 
Yes, the $130K was a surprise and made me think I was talking to a guy who was looking for all the money on a big job. He also said that he couldn't schedule it until July of next year. I got an estimate of $75K from another respected teak guy about a year and a half ago. That seemed about right. Big time guy said it was the "cost of material" that had gone up. Anyway.... Replacing them on my own is beyond my knowledge and energy level. No way. Just pulling off the teak and prepping is beyond it much less the entire project. If I keep the boat and do anything in total it would be fiberglass and non-skid. In the meantime, I will be re-caulking and bunging where needed. I can handle that but bet it will be more of a job than I anticipate. I would also like to minor league sand it to get rid of some of the ridges. Just delaying the inevitable, I know. Wondering what others who have done similar projects think is the most efficient way to go about it. I would think that it would be to re-caulk and bung and then sand as the last step? I will have to do it in stages of course. Re-seam and bung and leave it alone until I am finished and then sand in total? I am prepared to pull the boat and go the fiberglass route if needed so I don't think I can do any real harm. Famous last words.
 
Decided I didn't like the repair I did on the lifted plank so I pull it completely. Deck seems solid underneath, sounds solid when tapped. Teak is 3/8" thick. I would upload pics but I think everyone knows what a missing teak plank looks like. Question, what is the best product to use as adhesive for the new plank? I'm trying to avoid spending $45 on a sausage of TDS adhesive for one 4' plank. I spoke with 3M and they suggest 5200 but with the teak primed/sealed. Is there a better alternative?
 
Decided I didn't like the repair I did on the lifted plank so I pull it completely. Deck seems solid underneath, sounds solid when tapped. Teak is 3/8" thick. I would upload pics but I think everyone knows what a missing teak plank looks like. Question, what is the best product to use as adhesive for the new plank? I'm trying to avoid spending $45 on a sausage of TDS adhesive for one 4' plank. I spoke with 3M and they suggest 5200 but with the teak primed/sealed. Is there a better alternative?

Black Sikaflex
 
I would not use 5200. At some point you will likely have to bite the bullet and pull the teak off and either replace it with teak, bring your wallet, or glass the decks. And then the 5200 will be a real pain getting off. I also would go with Sika. It isn’t as strong of an adhesive but do you need the strength of 5200?
 
I would not use 5200. At some point you will likely have to bite the bullet and pull the teak off and either replace it with teak, bring your wallet, or glass the decks. And then the 5200 will be a real pain getting off. I also would go with Sika. It isn’t as strong of an adhesive but do you need the strength of 5200?

Thanks. Which Sikaflex? 291? 295?
 
Yes 440 for seams. I have several tubes that are within expiration date. Have to glue down first though. I do have some other seams that I am recaulking but want to do them all at once.
 
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