Pig Bites Woman’s Butt

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I have seen the same in Jasper where people turn there backs on huge elk. These are wild animals people. She lucky to come away with a red mark!
 
There is a punch line to a joke in there. And I had better restrain myself.
 
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What were they thinking, playing with feral pigs? The article says swimming with them? Not us. We had one try to get into our dinghy when we got into shallow water. Thank goodness it was hypalon. ;)
 

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I have over three hundred pigs and have been bit numerous times, never on the butt however and never very severely. I also never turn my back on mature boars.
 
Hardly "feral." They were placed there by locals as a tourist attraction.
 
You should always be wary of someone who has pigs.

 
Huh? That explains a lot. Maybe that's why all of those women tell me I'm a pig?
 
I hate what has happened with the fascination over those stupid pigs. One of the worst things that have happened in the Bahamas. The pigs in the Abacos are even worse. The water near the beach at no name cay where they live has very high levels of bacteria from their fecal matter. The pigs are dehydrated and malnourished. They are also very hard on the native animals.

That practice, at least in the Abacos, needs to end.
 
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Haven't heard any recent reports of pigs occupying an island in the western end of the California Delta.
 
Nuttin' a little BBQ sauce wouldn't fix.


Exactly. Last time I was on no name the biggest, about 300 lbs., hog had a blue spot spray painted on its forehead. I've been around a few farms and quite a few pigs, so I thought to myself, "uh-huh."


Bahamians are generally very resourceful people. It's pretty smart that they are using the tourists to fatten up the main course for their next BBQ.


That said though, it's still a bad idea. The beach there above the high tide line is disgusting.
 
I’d have done some first aid immediately, perhaps even resuscitation.
 
Exactly. Last time I was on no name the biggest, about 300 lbs., hog had a blue spot spray painted on its forehead. I've been around a few farms and quite a few pigs, so I thought to myself, "uh-huh."


Bahamians are generally very resourceful people. It's pretty smart that they are using the tourists to fatten up the main course for their next BBQ.


That said though, it's still a bad idea. The beach there above the high tide line is disgusting.


I've watched kids and adults alike frollic in the sand and shallow water on No Name - disgusting!
 
Haven't heard any recent reports of pigs occupying an island in the western end of the California Delta.


My nephew hunts boar all over the southeast and reports they are spreading faster than the hunters/predators can control them.


I have seen them in salt marshes North and South Carolina.


Wonder if the locals will start treating them like the wild horses on some islands? :eek:
 
These hogs do a lot of damage to sugar cane and other crops in this area. They are prolific breeder and the population is increasing in spite of being trapped, hunted, and killed legally by any means except poison.
It is my exprerience the mature ones have a very strong gamey taste so are not eaten the very young ones less so but still it takes lots of work to make them palatable!
 
I hate what has happened with the fascination over those stupid pigs. One of the worst things that have happened in the Bahamas. The pigs in the Abacos are even worse. The water near the beach at no name cay where they live has very high levels of bacteria from their fecal matter. The pigs are dehydrated and malnourished. They are also very hard on the native animals.

That practice, at least in the Abacos, needs to end.


I KNOW... RIGHT?!?!?! :banghead:


We all need to let go of this dang obsession with pigs on beaches. TBH, I think the obsession is that they deal with the big ones ONLY to get to play with the piglets. They are NOT getting fed what they should be eating to stay healthy. I despise this kind of "animal tourism". And like Doug said, they pretty much crap and piss everywhere. We were in the Exumas last month, and while we wanted to take a boat tour of the area, none was offered that didn't go to Staniel Cay to see the pigs. /rant
 
These hogs do a lot of damage to sugar cane and other crops in this area. They are prolific breeder and the population is increasing in spite of being trapped, hunted, and killed legally by any means except poison.
It is my exprerience the mature ones have a very strong gamey taste so are not eaten the very young ones less so but still it takes lots of work to make them palatable!


I know this to be true.



Not sure if it would apply to these pigs though. They are domestic pigs that were released on the island within the last 10 years or so. They are fed food scraps that boaters give them, I don't know that they forage very much like wild hogs do. Given their diet, I bet they taste pretty good. I've been to a couple of pig roasts in the Bahamas, so who knows, I may have eaten one of them, lol.



They are starting to get aggressive though, a little bit like wild hogs.



You are also right about the damage wild hogs do and their population growth. My brother has a 1,000 acre farm in North Florida where we hunt. We shoot every hog we see, year round. We have managed to keep them down so far, but I know they are a problem in other places.
 
My wife and friend in 2017.

BTW her husband's name is.... Hubert!

 
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