Parquet floor

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shipshape

Senior Member
Joined
May 23, 2010
Messages
117
Location
Australia
Vessel Name
Eliza 1
Vessel Make
Halvorsen 42 Pilothouse
Dear experts ....My clipper from 1977 has the original parquet internal floor ... I remove the carpet .... found the floor being stained and stained , then varnished and varnished ..... and one more coat of varnish over the years ..... I now sanded it back with 40, than 60 , 100 and now 240 sandpaper .... now back to timber ...... we would like to keep the timber look.
Big question *now ... what do I use .... a coat of varnish or oil ?
Varnish I guess will be slippery ? *Oil will make marks when wet? *What is easier? and what is better?
Wouldn't mind some thoughts from the forum ....


Thanks.
Erik
 
You use a top coat of "Bowling Alley Varnish" ,

it is good no skid wet with sea water OR spilled beer.

Gymnasium or Bar varnish also are fine.

At most hardware stores., cheap.
 
Erik,

I and several dock mates*have had really good experience with "Ultimate Sole".

http://www.ultimatesole.com/index.asp?ID=10

I stands up to the dog and we used it on the steps.* It looks like it is wet the finish is so good but it is good for bare feet and soled shoes.

No connection just a customer.
 
Erik, I faced exactly the same thing in Lotus, and after I had refurbished the rest of the interior and re-varnished, and then realised that until I got a matching, durable, high gloss finish on the original parquetry floor, it (the whole interior I mean), would never look properly finished. So I bit the bullet, did what you did with belt sander, then smaller ones for the corners etc, then finished her with 4 coats of International (Interlux in the US), two pack, Perfection varnish, applied on consequtive days so no sanding between was needed. I will never regret it, as even today, 3 yrs on, the floor looks fantastic, and it is not slippery enough to matter. But the durability is everything, because of all the treading wear, stomped in sand, dropped stuff etc. So really, I don't think after all your hard work sanding you should use anything less than a good 2 pack (ie uses a hardener) on this critically important surface. Unless of course you are going to just cover it again with carpet - in which case why bother doing anything? This type of flooring was meant to be seen, and was, if you like, the one claim to fame of this make of boat. In our climate it looks great bare and shiny, with just mats in the places of highest traffic (maybe).
 
Go satin whatever you do!!!
 
What, you're going demonic now, Baker?

Oh... never miiiind.
 
Thank you Peter .... and others ....After sanding the floor ... it looks great ... Yeah I will not put the carpet back ... because the floor looks stunning ... old glory .... and Yeah I will try with the suggested varnish .....
Thanks.
Erik
 
The purpose of Satin varnish (and either a low gloss oiled finish , or varnish rubbed with rottenstone) is to stop internal reflections.

On a dockside cottage there is seldom a problem ,

but when the sun reflects off many bright surfaces under way , some folks PUKE.

Gym varnish works fine in modest conditions , ( many sail boats operate at 15-20 deg heel ) so hanging on for a wake fest is easy even for most marine motorists.
 
JD wrote:

Erik,

I and several dock mates*have had really good experience with "Ultimate Sole".

http://www.ultimatesole.com/index.asp?ID=10

I stands up to the dog and we used it on the steps.* It looks like it is wet the finish is so good but it is good for bare feet and soled shoes.

No connection just a customer.

Unfortunately Ultimate Sole is no longer being made. It was our favorite also and we still have some left. Chuck
 
Chuck,

Sorry to hear that.* It was a good product.

The web site is up but not current.* But it does list several retailers so there may be a supply out there.

-- Edited by JD on Wednesday 14th of July 2010 08:09:30 AM
 
On the recommedation of a pro painter I have used Helmsman varnish (from Minwax), high gloss, for years on my parquet floor. It stands up well, is easy to apply and cheap.
 
I used Epifanes Rubbed Effect on the wood floors of Delfin, as well as cabinetry.* It is the hardest product they make and holds up extremely well.* Like all matte finishes you have to stir it up well to mix the matting agents.* Once applied, it looks like a waxed finish, flows very well going on and you can't see any imperfections once it dries.* Highly recommended.
 
Well .... I'm finished .... I am pretty happy with the result .... I forgot to take the before picture .... what do we think?
 

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Looks pretty fine to me Erik.
See how it wears over time.

Benn
 
Looks great Erik, what did you use in the end....?

I'm about to bite the bullet and have the hull 2 pack re-sprayed, antifouled, prop-speeded, and do the superstructure with Toplac myself.* Unfortunately I found the stern gunwhale capping, (painted over old teak), is rotted out such I have decided I can no longer just keep on drilling, scouping and filling (with Epifill) like a mad dentist, or it will end up looking like a set of dentures, so I have to get a 2 metre section of the rail replaced - just another grand. 2iC spitting tacks, but she'll like the end result, I'm sure.* However, having done all the rest now, including my floor like you just have, I'll be able to take a breather after all this......for a time at least....till the next issue raises its head.

-- Edited by Peter B on Saturday 14th of August 2010 05:30:33 AM
 
Well .... I'm finished .... I am pretty happy with the result .... I forgot to take the before picture .... what do we think?


Can I send you my boats location?

LOOKS GREAT!
 
It does look very good Erik, what product did you decide to use?

-- Edited by Roostor on Sunday 15th of August 2010 03:19:44 PM
 
I just used the Feast Watson satin varnish for parquet floors ..... just did 3 coats and see how it goes .... there are probably better products, but its a product I had in the shed .....Do you think I need to use special marine varnish?
I need to give it some more coats once the other works are completed.
 
Unless you can't get anymore of the product you used...I would stay with it.
Just my $.02 but I always like to stay with the same product when overcoating.

If unable to use the same product, I would be sure to try to find a product with near same ingredients, and then prepare the surface per the label instructions.
 
Erik,

No need for a marine product inside. I used MoistureCure urethane on our sole 10 years ago and it looks great. I have*worked in the flooring business for 49 (third generation of a family concern) years. A great deal of our work is on the Connecticut coast. I have done many jobs in homes on the water and fail to see why a finish will work in the house but not in a boat. Our sole seems to bear this out.

That said, I always use a marine product with uv blockers for exterior work.

Rob
37' Sedan
 
I have done many jobs in homes on the water and fail to see why a finish will work in the house but not in a boat

Not many house floors have constant water below their structure.

Basements usually attempt a vapor barrier , no chance in most boats due to the floor hatches.
 
Sorry FF but I must disagree.*Our family has been doing jobs like this since the late1940's. We have yet to experience a failure. A basement floor is completly different*than a cabin sole. I believe (and experience bears it out) the the air gap and circulation*between the*sole and*bilge solves the vapor problem. If it did not, no finish would stick.

Leaving for Block Island in 30 minutes. Enjoy the rest of the week all!

Rob
37' Sedan



-- Edited by Datenight on Tuesday 17th of August 2010 07:59:37 AM
 
Thanks FF. We are on the hook. Diane brought her iPad and I could not resist, I needed my TF fix. Friends are meeting us tomorrow and we will go the the Oar for the fish tacos and ice cold Naragansetts.

Rob
37' Sedan
 
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