Painting engines

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Baggiolini

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
406
Location
USA
Vessel Name
Mahalo
Vessel Make
Defever 44
Hola everyone

I've got some corrosion and peeling paint on my twin Cummins 6BTs as well as two colors of paint. I'm going to clean them up and spray paint them with the original hideous Cummins beige. I've fixed the source of the corrosion.

Mechanic suggested I paint the engine mounts with a special paint that changes the rust into a protective coating. I wrote down the name but have since lost the paper. Any idea?

Any helpful tips?
 
Baggiolini wrote:
Hola everyone I've got some corrosion and peeling paint on my twin Cummins 6BTs as well as two colors of paint. I'm going to clean them up and spray paint them with the original hideous Cummins beige. I've fixed the source of the corrosion. Mechanic suggested I paint the engine mounts with a special paint that changes the rust into a protective coating. I wrote down the name but have since lost the paper. Any idea? Any helpful tips?
*There are quite a few out on the market...not sure any is foolproof or long lasting...just whatever you use...be careful of any rubber/synthetics that the converters may get on.
 
Ospho (sp?) is a paint-on product that "neutralizes" rust after the loose scale has been removed, after which it should be painted. But it is not a protective coating on it's own.
 
That is the name, thanks Marin!
 
Check out the paint departments at Home Cheapo and pickup a gallon of Phosphoric acid...
 
FYI
The Rustoleum "Almond" is an almost perfect match for the Cummins "beige". Be careful not to confuse "Almond" with "Antique White"!!
The paint is available both as spray and regular brush on. I have used both generously with good results. Rustoleum also is pretty good at "killing" rust, and they have various primers for rusty metals.
You should also consider a good quality lashing of zinc primer on engine mounts and other exposed low down areas before priming/painting.
Chris
 
Does regular paint (spray or brush) work for engine blocks and attachments?*
 
If you do a search on rust.

lot's of answers on past treads.

SD
 
Alfton wrote:
Does regular paint (spray or brush) work for engine blocks and attachments?*
Paint used on engines needs to be resistant to the kind of heat it will be subjected to on a long-term basis.
 
Last year I used some stove and BBQ grill paint on my exhaust. You paint it on and run the temp up to 250 Deg and let it cool do it again. The paint is then*good to 1200 Deg it hasn't come off. It did smoke a bit during the first heating.

Now it's *good to go.

SD
 
Where do you get high temp white? Doesn't the primer or converter have to be high temp as well, where do you get that?
 
Daddyo wrote:
Where do you get high temp white?
******** I got mine from the Cummins dealer.
 

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SeaHorse II wrote:Daddyo wrote:
Where do you get high temp white?
******** I got mine from the Cummins dealer.

Walt:

Do I see a small blob of grease down in your engine room!? :shocked:

*

*

No, wait, its on my computer screen. All gone. Sorry.
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dwhatty wrote:
Do I see a small blob of grease down in your engine room!?

_____________________________________________________

*Yesterday I noticed a lot of black specs in the bilge and around the drip pan but they vacumed up easily.
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As previously stated, the regular Rustoleum spray or brush-on "Almond" paint works fine for Cummins "beige" engines.
The engine does not get so hot that special "heat resistant" paint is required. I have touched up with this for the last few years.
It looks good and last just fine. If an engine gets hot enough for this to be a problem, I would suggest it is getting too hot!!
We typically get to 185 degrees F. Obviously the closer you get to the exhaust, the hotter it gets, and these engine parts were never painted in the first place.

Chris
 
Chris, what else is not painted? Some of my hoses are painted, some are not, some electrical connections are and some are not!
 
My engine is a 1999 6BTA5.9. Most of it is painted, except for the bare steel flange connected to the insulated exhaust riser. I do not understand why engine manufacturers paint hoses, connectors, wiring, plus etc. I can only assume that painting is the last step after assembly and is just easier/cheaper to spray the whole engine. Seems like it would be better to not paint these items. But, I have found the Rustoleum to be very forgiving, easy to use, and a near perfect color match. Good luck!!
 
I just touched my* 210 Cummins up. Krylon makes a Cummins beige high temp engine paint.

*http://www.kpg-industrial.com/products/engine_paint_with_ceramic/

*I am in the process of painting my engine room. Shifting to white from gray. The white is so bright that I may just paint the engines white too. Ive gone overboard with the project and replaced my* four old dome lights with* five, 24" LED bars. No more dark engine room.
 
Old Stone wrote:
Walt - How old is that engine room? Looks like it should be in Vogue magazine. How often do you have to clean it? Wow!

*____________________________________________________

I don't know those hoses look like they may have some discoloration on them.

Perhaps a factory defect.

SD
*


-- Edited by skipperdude on Thursday 16th of February 2012 04:27:07 PM
 
Walt keeps a small person living in his bilges 24/7 whose only job is to paint and clean them. Labor is cheap in San Diego.
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Old Stone wrote:
Walt - How old is that engine room?* ____________________________________________________
The boat was first splashed in Oct 2004. The engine and the bilges were repainted 2 years ago. After many years of boating I discovered the secret to having a clean engineroom. Don't use the boat.
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*





*
 
A great tip on engine painting:* Wrap your hoses and wiring harness in tin foil prior to painting.* Way easier than taping.* Just be careful of any electrical connections, like on the alternator.

Some spots will still need to be taped, but the tin foil covers way more area and is easier on curves, tubes, weird angles, etc.

I also keep an old shoe box lid in one hand to block overspray onto the engine room walls.
 
skipperdude wrote:Old Stone wrote:
Walt - How old is that engine room? Looks like it should be in Vogue magazine. How often do you have to clean it? Wow!

*____________________________________________________

I don't know those hoses look like they may have some discoloration on them.

Perhaps a factory defect.

SD

Looks like flagrant hose neglect to me!*

Is that paint I see on some of those hoses?* I can only assume that the Cummins dealer is running low on hoses.* ;-)
 
Old Stone wrote:
Only those in San Diego ! The rest of us though..............
* * * ** I'd bet money that Moonstruck does as I do ....Or maybe I should say "I do as Moonstruck does."
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There are "cruisers" and there are "yachters" per Moonstruck ("Cruising: Fixing your boat in exotic places
Yachting: Paying someone to fix your boat in exotic places").

It appears that Moonstruck and Seahorse are yachters. Where do you fit in? Even if you are in more mundane rather than exotic places. Sometimes I wish that I could be a yachter although most of the time I enjoy being a cruiser. Maybe we should start a poll.
 
White is best.* Makes the "dungeon" brighter, and oil leaks show up well.* Easier to find what needs attention, I think.


-- Edited by markpierce on Tuesday 28th of February 2012 05:12:19 PM
 

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Skite....just wait until your boat is 30 odd years old, then see if white is so good...
But no offence Mark - she is a real beauty, and I'm just envious...
 
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