M/V vs. M/Y

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dougd1

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S/V vs. S/Y

Which is the proper way? Does it matter? Does anyone care?
 
dougd1 wrote:
S/V vs. S/Y Which is the proper way? Does it matter? Does anyone care?
*Doug, it's not because I really care about it, but I think a private pleasure vessel is a yacht ie: M/Y or S/Y.* A commercial vessel is a vessel ie: M/V or S/V.* Maybe someone knows the exact definition.

*
 
RV.

Recreation Vehicle is closest but Research Vessel works for impressionable lubber friends.
 
Really depends on how high you carry your nose doesn't it?

*

Dan
 
Capt Dan wrote:
Really depends on how high you carry your nose doesn't it?

*

Dan
Very well said!!!

*
 
I haven't the faintest idea what you fellows are talking about.** Care to educate the ignorant?
 
M/V = Motor vessel,* M/Y = motor yacht, S/V =* sail vessel, S/Y = sail yacht,* R/V = Research Vessel, etc.
 
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** Thanks!
 
When is the new boat being delivered?

*

Dan
 
Capt Dan wrote:
When is the new boat being delivered?

*
*Me?* Next month.

*
 
dougd1 wrote:
S/V vs. S/Y Which is the proper way? Does it matter? Does anyone care?
*

*i don't know. *Mine is just a boat. *
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When we got our boat, the name was Fluke. We liked it so we kept it. It turns out that a single syllable name spoken on the radio does not get across well. Especially Fluke. It sounds like I'm choking. So I call my self "motor vessel Fluke" on the VHF to avoid the choking thing.
 
xfedex wrote:
*It turns out that a single syllable name spoken on the radio does not get across well.
******* I think you're right! I never gave that much thought.

*
 
I have a fricken Placard provided by the NMMA and it says "Yacht Certification"!!!! So I have a certified yacht....Dammit!!!!...
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. I crack up every time I look at that thing.
 
The definition of the word yacht has changed over the years.

A dictionary I have from the early 70s defines a yacht as: "A small sailing or mechanically propelled vessel, used for pleasure cruises or racing."

A dictionary from 2005 states:" A yacht is a large recreational watercraft."

I suppose the word now defines,* what I call a "mega yacht" with lots of bling and helicopters and toys!

That leaves my small mechanically propelled vessel used for pleasure cruises OUT!

JohnP
 
The best "yacht" definition I have heard ( and is my standard answer to non-boaters, who ask it all the time), is when the boat has solid interior doors instead of curtains. Seems to satisfy them!
 
What should one say if the boat is a motor-sailor? MSY/Audition? Motor Sailor Yacht? Motor Sailor Vessel? Or as Larry Z described it to me as 70/30.

How does 70% Motor Vessel/30% Sail Yacht "Audition" sound?

From here on I will be saying that. 70MV/30SV "Audition", yup, that's what Im gonna do.

Dan
 
I have heard tow boat captains say that when*private vessels identify themselves as motor vessels, that they are expecting a commercial vessel to be on the other end.* They like to know when they are meeting a professional or pleasure craft.* They sometimes refer to private vessels as "monkey boats".* It is unfortunate, but the behavior of some operators fits the description.

They will respect a private craft that identifies itself and requests passing or meeting instructions.* Their demeaner can change markedly upon learning that you are knowledgable.
 
Moonstruck wrote:
I have heard tow boat captains say that when*private vessels identify themselves as motor vessels, that they are expecting a commercial vessel to be on the other end.* They like to know when they are meeting a professional or pleasure craft.* They sometimes refer to private vessels as "monkey boats".* It is unfortunate, but the behavior of some operators fits the description.

They will respect a private craft that identifies itself and requests passing or meeting instructions.* Their demeaner can change markedly upon learning that you are knowledgable.
*So, I guess I shall refer to myself on the radio as "Monkey Motor Vessel, Happy Destiny" from now on.

*
 
Don,

*

I resemble that statement.

*

You are right,* if a pleasure boat even answers the radio I will give him/her respect.* If they initiate,* even more.

*

Nothing worse than towing a barge and not being able to make contact in a crossing or close channel situation.

*

Dan
 
Yep, you are right Don. We have a large concentration of commercial traffic that mixes in with the pleasure boats. They do refer to them as pleasure boats on the radio and I refer to myself as such.
 
Ya left out F/V Fishing vessel.

So we have S/V, M/V, M/Y,R/V,S/V, S/Y,M/B and F/V.

What's that spell!!

SD


*


-- Edited by skipperdude on Thursday 14th of April 2011 11:42:19 AM
 
Baker wrote:
Yep, you are right Don. We have a large concentration of commercial traffic that mixes in with the pleasure boats. They do refer to them as pleasure boats on the radio and I refer to myself as such.
*"Pleasure boat" insinuates sensual/animalistic activities.* I prefer a G-rated "recreational vessel" label.

*
 
markpierce wrote:Baker wrote:
Yep, you are right Don. We have a large concentration of commercial traffic that mixes in with the pleasure boats. They do refer to them as pleasure boats on the radio and I refer to myself as such.
*"Pleasure boat" insinuates sensual/animalistic activities.* I prefer a G-rated "recreational vessel" label.

*

*Mark, why would you prefer G-rated over sensual/animalistic activities?
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*
 
Moonstruck wrote:
*Mark, why would you prefer G-rated over sensual/animalistic activities?
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*
*Because I have a private self and a public one.** When communicating with ships and the authorities, I want to be*recognized as a boat operator rather than a "dirty old man" messing around*in a*pleasure craft.*

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*
 
Per my USCG Master's course -
M/V = over 20 meters in length, power driven vessel
M/B (motor boat) = under 20 meters in length
20 meters is a major "break point" for USCG reg's...
12 meters is as well, in regards to whistles/bell, etc
 
markpierce wrote: When communicating with ships and the authorities, I want to be*recognized as a boat operator rather than a "dirty old man" messing around*in a*pleasure craft.*
*Man, that's some heavily repressed Freudian stuff ...* especially when you consider nearly every maritime authority (meaning the folks who own the waters around their country) refer to recreational vessels as* "pleasure vessels" for rulemaking purposes.

*

*
 
RickB wrote:*... nearly every maritime authority (meaning the folks who own the waters around their country) refer to recreational vessels as* "pleasure vessels" for rulemaking purposes.
*

*

*My Coot's USCG Certification of Documentation doesn't mention "pleasure" but the vessel has a "recreation" endorsement.* Hate to have the USCG cite me for pleasure when I'm only allowed recreation.*
doh.gif


California's boating accident report form begins "The operator of every recreational vessel is required ..." and it doesn't mention "pleasure" but does categorize activity among recreational, commercial, and other.

Perhaps the description "pleasure craft" has fallen from favor in the U.S. unlike Hong Kong, Canada and wherever else?


-- Edited by markpierce on Thursday 14th of April 2011 04:45:39 PM
 
tachyon wrote:
The best "yacht" definition I have heard ( and is my standard answer to non-boaters, who ask it all the time), is when the boat has solid interior doors instead of curtains. Seems to satisfy them!
*That means I have a yacht!

*

*
 

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