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Tidy little pocket cruiser for the coast.


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"HULA GIRL" is for sale. This 26 foot North Sea Trawler was restored by a real craftsman. The deck head and V Berth are finished with local clear cedar, cabinets of oiled oak and bulkheads of teak. The vessel was completely rewired by a marine electrical engineer. The salon has huge windows port and starboard with privacy curtains and a sliding glass door astern. The comfortable L shaped settee has a removable table. A Bus heater and an "Espar" forced air diesel provide a nice heat. The galley has a two burner alcohol stove, ample locker space for cooking and tableware, a sink, new faucet, new water pump, a large pantry and a 12 volt fridge, freezer. An 80 watt solar panel keeps batteries charged with the fridge on. The helm station has full instrumentation, controls, electronics (auto pilot, rudder angle indicator, sounder, radar and more). A good set of tools is under the helms seat. V berth has double foam padding a takes a king sheet at the after end. The head has a Jabsco electric toilet. Aft deck. 9,9 Yamaha, Remote jog steering. Salt water wash down hose, rail mount BBQ. Fwd, a 15 kg Bruce anchor is backed by 250 feet of Hi Tensile galvanized chain on an oversized "Lofrans" winch. Foot controls and remote controls at the helm. The main engine is a 75hp "Yanmar" with low hours and a newly rebuilt turbo in a clean, surprisingly roomy engine room. Heavy duty gear box. Recent survey and engine survey. Auxiliary engine is a 9.9 Yamaha mounted astern on stainless trackways that lowers the engine when needed. The tender is a "Zodiac" with a 2.2 hp "Suzuki ". It sits in chocks atop the cabin with an electric winch on a stainless davit. Fishing: Four prawn traps, "Ace" line hauler, crab trap,. Four trolling and a spincasting rods and reels, two "Scottie" down riggers, lots of salmon gear. Hula Girl is boat house kept at Oyster Bay Marina in Ladysmith Hula Girl is a pretty, comfortable vessel, well maintained, clean and ready to go. Asking $ 47,900 for Hula Girl. Let's talk.
 
The South Steyne is for sale. I`m an unashamed admirer of this vessel, a former Manly Ferry which serviced the Sydney-Manly route for many years before a fire saw her retired, and into a series of refits, owners, and uses. Built in the UK, she was delivered by sea, including through the Suez Canal,to Sydney. I hope she finds an enthusiastic owner or consortium, perhaps the Sydney Maritime Museum will pick her up, but I doubt it.
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The South Steyne is for sale. I`m an unashamed admirer of this vessel, a former Manly Ferry which serviced the Sydney-Manly route for many years before a fire saw her retired, and into a series of refits, owners, and uses. Built in the UK, she was delivered by sea, including through the Suez Canal,to Sydney. I hope she finds an enthusiastic owner or consortium, perhaps the Sydney Maritime Museum will pick her up, but I doubt it.
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I used to use a white noise generator with the diesel thrum of the Manly Ferry as a sleep aid.
 
I used to use a white noise generator with the diesel thrum of the Manly Ferry as a sleep aid.
South Steyne is a steamer, her steam engine was originally coal fired,later diesel fired. But I`m sure there are diesel gensets onboard.
 
Here is the right up for when the ad vanishes and click on this link for the article on Beebe. Good read.


This classic yacht, designed and built under the direction of the legendary Robert (Bob) Beebe, underwent a two year, complete overhaul, restoration and upgrade, finishing in 2023.

The hull, of Burmese teak, was found to be in good condition, requiring only stripping of old paint and recaulking.

The deck of mahogany plywood, had some areas of water intrusion where deck hardware was installed. Those areas were removed, repaired and then covered (the entire deck) with bi-axial fiberglass, epoxy and painted.

A new SS bowsprit was fabricated and installed along with all new SS stanchions.

A new teak swim platform and SS dingy davits were installed as well.

The rub rail and cap rail were replaced with new teak.

The Ford Lehman engine, one of the most reliable diesel engines of all time, was removed from the boat and completely overhauled by the owner, a Mercedes trained diesel mechanic and has just 300 hours since the rebuild.

The boat was rewired, 9 New batteries were added along with

4 solar panels and controller.

The plumbing system was renewed, including servicing all bronze seacocks, all new freshwater pumps and piping, including toilets, faucets and macerator pumps. A new hot water heater and a watermaker were installed.

The galley was completely redesigned and updated with new countertops. The cupboards and table tops were revarnished, walls painted and all new custom cushions and upholstery installed.

The refrigeration system was replaced with modern, 12V systems, and a newly restored, 3 burner, propane stove with oven installed.

Both the forward and aft cabin have been entirely renovated and painted. The forward cabin features a double bed, the aft cabin also has a double bed plus a newly installed desk and dedicated work space. New mattresses in both.

The sole throughout has been refinished, including the wheelhouse floor where the carpet was removed and replaced with beautiful teak stripping.

In short, Passagemaker is a classic boat, updated to modern standards, capable of giving the new owner years of safe, comfortable, happy sailing!




NOTE: This boat is located in Martinique, FWI, not Holland, Michigan
 

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Wonder about putting glass over wood. Have heard that may lead to more not less troubles down the road. Not such an issue on epoxy strip plank or cold molded but maybe problematic on plank on frame.
 
I don't know if these have been posted but these should qualify as "interesting". They're rated to hold over 70 people and one is self-propelled!
I'm pretty sure they are owned by Marcus @ Trans Atlantic Diesel. I recall seeing them in the field when there buying Perkins parts.
 

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This big 1993 Tolley may be of interest. Don`t forget the favorable (though diminishing currently)exchange rate, the AUD buys 67c of a USD. Interesting how much coring there is in hull, keel, etc, not sure about that.
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Perhaps some of you follow his channel on Youtube and already know what he has done now. Gus, the guy of 'In Too Deep' has bought a 70' Broward, which needs a lot of work to get it back up to speed.
That does mean that his other boat, a 1968 50' Hatteras is now for sale.
If you have followed his channel you know what he has done to this boat to bring it up to speed. The boat has been surveyed last year (required for insurance purposes), was valued at 137.000 USD. Gus is now offering it for sale for 135.000 USD.
Having seen what he has done to the boat I feel that value is reasonable. Anyone buying that boat will have a technically sound boat.
 
Here are a couple of boats I found interesting. Location Lulu's Homeport Marina Orange Beach, Alabama. Lulu is Jimmy Buffet's sister.
The steel trawler is Ulysses (and for sale) the sailboat is "Old Squaw"
Saw the Ulysses in Ganges BC this summer. Thought, "that's an interesting boat, maybe I should post a picture to Trawler Forum." Then I saw that it was THE original "interesting boat." Long way from Alabama!
 
Has this power cat been mentioned before? It is a Schionning design similar to one that was discussed earlier, IIRC that was notable for its efficient hull (but there were skeptics). No mention of consumption mentioned in this listing, but it has skinny entry and small engines reminiscent of the previously discussed Schionning PC. The old link is kaput, so I cannot do much to verify. Thoughts?

https://www.yachtworld.com/yacht/2018-schionning-49-9285392/
 
Interesting boats

The other Schionning PC was mentioned earlier in this thread by Dark Side. Has standup engine rooms, but it appears they plopped a 10K genset on top of one of the engines. Seems an odd choice, but then again I'm a newbie...
 
That cat actually makes some sense as a functional blue water boat. Hulls extend for a distance before the house so with that netting and no structure theres reserve buoyancy forward and green water will rapidly clear. Entries of the hulls is sufficiently narrow it will wave pierce and have a decent ride in a seaway. It won’t be so prone to the hobbyhorsing you see with cats aimed at the charter market. She should be very easily driven and efficient. But retains sufficient beam to have good form stability as to not turn turtle.
One of the problems with all cats until you get to mega yacht proportions is access to the engines. Here, especially in a powercat, this one has its problems. Similarly there’s a problem with very narrow hulls. Both in cats and the current LDL boats like Artnautica. How to do a liveable interior. Again think Tenant did a better job dealing with this difficulty.
Personally if thinking about a blue water multi would go with a tri. Power not having to deal with a sailing rig can get away with shorter alas and smaller amas. The amas can be set back from the bow of the center hull. Maneuvering at close quarters even in a cross wind is dramatically improved. Anchoring is easier. Properly done the center house and the deckhouse on top allow a livable interior without excess weight. Performance and efficiency can be better than a comparible cat.
One sees such power tris in very large sizes and military vessels but unfortunately not in modest sizes. Rapido has done this for sail making those the fastest cruising sailboats in the world. Even in decent sizes the floats retract so berthing and storage isn’t the obstacle it is for other designs. But unfortunately other than LEEN I’m unaware of a cruising power tri in production. I don’t like the LEEN. Looks too chunky to my eye. Word on the street while I was cruising is some NEEL sailing cats had durability issues but have no personal experience to confirm. Would like to see a cruising power tri with retractable floats of 50 to 60 ft. With a single engine having true access from inside the center hull not through the deck and a usable liveaboard interior. Such a boat would sip fuel and be a joy to behold.


 
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Nice feedback Hippocampus. Sadly, except for the LEENs, there is not much out there for powered trimarans. What got my attention with Oui Chat was the engine access and the fine hulls. I agree that Tennant made better compromises between fine entry and hull space, but I don't think engine access was uniformly great...maybe Domino was an exception. The tendency of production cats to hobby-horse is something that I would dread. Maybe not a show-stopper, but such un-sea kindly behavior seems to be the trade-off made to get more interior room...at least until one gets to longer cats.
 
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Another vessel that caught my eye:

PRIVATEER TRAWLER 50 motor yacht for sale | De Valk Yacht broker

Similar to other Dutch steel boats like the Linssen Grand Sturdy line, but I've never seen them discussed here before (I searched!). They seem to have a layout more like a small trawler than the Linssen boats (e.g., dual helms, galley up, no aft cabin). A few positives that stood out to me: dual helm stations, pilot house doors on port and starboard, dual M1 John Deere engines, CE A rating, can get limbo low enough for the Canal de Midi (3.4 M), has a Seakeeper 9, huge LFP service battery (30,000 Wh), 3 cabins, 2 heads, swim platform, cockpit that can be enclosed, decent sized lazarette, efficient AC/heat systems.

The downsides from my POV: Seakeeper rather than fins; none of the cabins are amazing; cramped engine room (Seakeeper doesn't help); the anchoring tackle seems small for a 33 ton vessel; no solar that I can recall seeing; no clear numbers on fuel efficiency (tankage seems OK, but published consumption numbers don't exist); Privateer Yachts BV seems to no longer exist.

For those who are interested, a video of moving a similar vessel from Southhampton to the south of France:


and discussion of the video:


Cheers,

Jay
 
Have a SeaKeeper 5 on a single screw NT42. It sits mid line in the lazerette but placement allows full access. Downside is it’s heavy so you need to think about where you place other weight to maintain trim.
Although I agree for a boat that will only do blue water where you commonly turn off depth and use that screen area for other purposes fins make sense. But for the coastal cruiser gyros make huge sense over other choices (fins, fish, Magnus, rolling chocks etc,).
Having lived with the Seakeeper now for a few years here’s why.
First I’ve seen multiple areas where debris in the water would hit or entangle fins. I made an offer on a nordhavn after its fin became entangled with its anchor chain causing great damage. several owners have told me of entanglements with fishing gear, weed, and other debris as well as damage from hard turning after grounding in mud. Although fin placement can be done without it extending past maximum beam they are still vulnerable when docking or rafting. Gyros don’t extend outside the hull so when off (or on) they don’t contribute to parasitic drag. Only penalty is the weight when off to mpg. Unlike the blue water cruiser most days rolling is a non issue and can easily be handled if necessary by increasing speed on a SD hull. So agree for a full displacement hull doing blue water fins make sense. But for the coastal boat perhaps not. There’s one potential exception. If striving for light ice class fins are a problem. If the boat is large enough retractable fins (Quamtum makes them) surmount this issue. But gyros and retractable Magnus are the other choices.
I’m happy with SeaKeeper over non vacuum like Quick. There’s a reason they are still the most popular. Here the vacuum means a more effective unit as does the weight. Service intervals are long enough apart as to be a minor inconvenience.
The Privateer mentioned above is an excellent boat,imho. Believe it was spec’d with mixed use in mind. Near coastal (out to 200nm) and coastal/inland. Think the original owner made excellent choices for that use pattern. Although a “A” boat do not view it as a blue water trans oceanic voyager. In that size range think a single screw with better access and more efficiency would better serve. There’s a reason that in that size range N, KK, DD, Doggersbank, Seaton etc. are singles when used for that purpose. Beyond efficiency access is key. 50’ is small and there’s a lot of stuff to carry when voyaging.
My personal issues with this Privateer are different. Think it would be a great ownership experience if doing coastal/near coastal but not for voyaging. If going steel would want to make use of the security and benefits of steel. It’s the most abrasion / puncture resistant and strongest boat building material in common usage. Would want maximal benefit from that material. In short a voyaging boat spec’d as such.
 
Layout of the boat would also drive the gyro vs something else decision in my mind for coastal use. Some boats just don't have a good spot for a gyro, or you wouldn't want to give up the space it consumes. On my boat, for example, I can't think of a way to install one without impeding engine access or needing to reduce tankage.
 
Here is a cool boat, and to make it better it is in Brooklin ME, where one of the coolest yards ever is located.


This would give me confidence. I thinkI have seen this boat when we purchased our Scout, in fact I believe we cruised right by it. I'll have to go check out the pictures.

Will Sturdy, chief designer at Brooklin Boat Yard, purchased her in 2020 and during the summer lives aboard with his family cruising the islands around Penobscot Bay.Island Maid II is currently in the water in Brooklin, Maine.

Neat facebook page for Trawlers for sale here:


The Island Maid II is a beautiful example of a BC salmon boat converted to pleasure, and so far as I know is the largest of these boats on the East Coast. She is as close to the ideal liveaboard boat for cruising the Maine coast as I’ve experienced, and is quite the head-turner in every harbor we drop anchor in. Her interior is well set up for cruising, with a spacious galley and L-shaped dinette up in the wheelhouse. This galley-up arrangement leaves the entire fish-hold open for accommodations, featuring a large double berth to starboard, a bench/single berth to port, a head, large electrical locker, and generous storage space. Down forward of the engine room her original crew quarters have been retained with bunks and a small washbasin. Her large wheelhouse has a sliding door forward alongside the helm and a dutch door aft. Her stern deck is the ultimate hang out spot, and between the six folding chairs stored in the lazarette, beanbags, and plenty of seating on the aft house she can fit quite a crowd. A fully framed awning provides shade.She is fully outfitted for cruising, however her systems are quite simple and easy to maintain. Her electrical system includes a massive 900 Ah battery bank and 300w of solar – we have never run the engine just to generate electricity, despite sometimes living aboard for weeks at a time without leaving the mooring! The electrical system is more than sufficient to keep the fridge going in addition to typical loads – we turn the fridge on every spring, and don’t shut it off again until fall decommissioning. The Cat 318 engine is a real workhorse, and provides plenty of torque for her 36” wheel to push her along quite well. We typically cruise at 6-6.5 kts burning less than a gallon an hour. Her articulating rudder gives a ridiculous amount of steering authority, so close-quarters maneuvering is really good despite her size.Brief history: She was built in 1945 by John Anderson - a shipwright in Sointula, BC – as a salmon packer to work with the local seine fleet. She worked commercially with the fishing fleet until the early 90s, at which point she was converted into a liveaboard cruiser. Much of the conversion work and significant refitting of the hull & deck structures was carried out by Andy Anderson, John Anderson’s grandson, in the same yard she was built in. In 2011 she caught the eye of Brad Pease, owner of Pease Boat Works and Marine Railway in Chatham, MA. Brad had her trucked east, and over the course of several years refit her in his boatyard while living aboard during summers. After his retirement, he moved up to Maine with the Maid. Will Sturdy, chief designer at Brooklin Boat Yard, purchased her in 2020 and during the summer lives aboard with his family cruising the islands around Penobscot Bay.Island Maid II is currently in the water in Brooklin, Maine. Everything listed below is a brief summary - full specifications and additional photos are available upon request. General Specifications:Builder: John Anderson, Sointula, BCYear: 1945Construction: Wood (Carvel planked, cedar over yew and oak timbers)Length Overall: 47 ft.Length Waterline: 41 ft. 6 in.Beam: 13 ft. 2 in.Draft: 6 ft.Displacement: 31.5 tonnes (63,000 lbs) (Measured spring 2021)Engine: 1950 Caterpillar 318; 80hp at 1,600 RPMTransmission: TwinDisc MG165 3:1Propeller: 36” BronzeRudder: Custom Lowell Stambaugh “Deflector” high-lift stainless-steel rudderSteering: Passive hydraulicFuel Tankage: 400 gal in two wing tanksFresh Water Tankage: 170 gal in two tanks in the lazaretteBlack Water Tankage: 40 gal tank outboard of aft headHouse Batteries: 8x Trojan T105, 900 Ah at 12VDC. New 2022.Start Batteries: 2x 8D (24V)Inverter/Charger: Heart InterfaceSolar: 300w with a Victron SmartSolar controllerWindlass: Hydraulic spool windlassPrimary Anchor: SARCA Excel 88lbs (new 2023)Secondary Anchors: 75lb CQR & 100lb Navy styleStern Anchor: Fortress FX37
 

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Yep, there it is, had to go look at the old pictures and found a few more. That is a very handsome boat, and knowing who owns it, it has to be good. Forty-Nine thousand is not a terrible price.

And that was a happy day indeed when we met Bill and purchased his Fairchild Scout. We saw Legend being built the year before as an overturned hull, then came back on the very day it was being sea trailed and filmed-lucky us. Here's a few pictures. The Scout is now on Lake Keowee.

Love that place, would like to be there now. If you are ever in that area, you should by all means stop in Booklin Boat Yard. As Maynard Bray said, "Wood is good".
 

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The Privateer mentioned above is an excellent boat,imho. Believe it was spec’d with mixed use in mind. Near coastal (out to 200nm) and coastal/inland. Think the original owner made excellent choices for that use pattern. Although a “A” boat do not view it as a blue water trans oceanic voyager. In that size range think a single screw with better access and more efficiency would better serve. There’s a reason that in that size range N, KK, DD, Doggersbank, Seaton etc. are singles when used for that purpose. Beyond efficiency access is key. 50’ is small and there’s a lot of stuff to carry when voyaging.
My personal issues with this Privateer are different. Think it would be a great ownership experience if doing coastal/near coastal but not for voyaging. If going steel would want to make use of the security and benefits of steel. It’s the most abrasion / puncture resistant and strongest boat building material in common usage. Would want maximal benefit from that material. In short a voyaging boat spec’d as such.
Thanks for your take. Your thoughts about the SK vs fins makes sense. The mixed use mission is what I have in mind. It will not cross oceans, but it could be used in many applications: canals, coastal cruising, great loop, Caribbean, etc. I'm resigned (sigh...) to the idea of using transport if we were to change cruising grounds. The odd thing is loading the vessel with 30K Watt hours of LFP batteries, but with no solar, no water maker, no uprated alternators...maybe they just hated running the genset, but autonomy away from the marina doesn't appear to be a high priority.

Your last paragraph, if I understand correctly: you don't believe that steel is the material of choice for a boat that is the use case of the Privateer, or did I misunderstand?
 
Rather I think steel is a very decent choice for a full displacement full time cruiser. It’s been decades since coating tech and construction techniques have been sorted out to the degree that corrosion and electrolysis are a significant issue. The few people I know (being an American) tell me maintenance is no worse than grp. I’ve never understood the aversion Americans have for Fe for full displacement and cold molded wood for lighter boats. Again cold molded wood or even strip plank means no more maintenance and equal service life to grp. With these materials the devil is in the details and wouldn’t buy non grp except from an established builder in that material with an excellent rep and a design from a NA well versed in those materials. Look at the boats coming out of Covey island or Brooklyn or the Dutch boats. Several times we looked to buy Fe or modern wood. Held back given the poor market for resale in the US not because of the material. I hit the lottery I’d be on a doggersbank 77. Al on Fe seems to check all my buttons. atlena seems to do it right.
 
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