Horn fetish?

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markpierce

Master and Commander
Joined
Sep 25, 2010
Messages
12,557
Location
USA
Vessel Name
Carquinez Coot
Vessel Make
penultimate Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
My background is 24- 28-foot auxiliary sailboats, where electronics were limited to powering navigational lights.* ...

Thus, signals were made with a horn using*lung power or a self-contained, compressed-air cylinder.

Now, with*my Coot in*the future, powered by diesel engine generating "mucho" electrical power (120 vac, 24 vdc), the "horizon" seems almost limitless.

So, forgive me if I went crazy, spending thousands of dollars to replace the standard electrical horn with the*D-1 Kahlenberg air horns on my Coot.* I asked my GF about the sound.* She said they sounded like the Vallejo ferries.* No, I responded, although I like the sound of the D-2 horns better, they sound too much like the ferries, so got the higher-pitched D-1s.* She agreed the D-2 better matched* the ferries.

http://www.kahlenberg.com/yacht.html
 
Mark,* The K is my dream horn.* My electric tinker toy is shot and I am back to the old sailboat horn you described.** Hopefully I will come up with an air horn more in keeping with a modest vessel.

I got horn envy- for sure!** JohnP
 
Here's an air horn that's really loud and deep, at a reasonable price:* FIAMM Fultone II.* Probably not like a K, but a fine and affordable horn.

Found my second one new in box on eBay for $130, including compressor, pushbutton switch, and relay.* Had to replace a 10-year old one that went TU because it was mounted horizontally rather than at a down angle, and ingested too much salt water.
 
Anchored in Desolation sound on a recent trip, we heard a sunset horn symphony.
It was started by one medium sized boat, with ordinary horns. A few others joined in. Then one converted workboat chimed in with a grouping of 4 unequal length big horns. Not to be outdone, another converted workboat topped everyone else with his blast.
The biggest blast was a horn recycled from a decommissioned BC ferry.
This only worked because of the size of the anchorage. Nobody was too close together.

Yours would fit somewhere in the workboat group.

You will get lots of opportunity to give others horn envy.
 
Maybe this is just a PNW thing, but outside of horn use in fog, we almost never hear anyone use a horn up here. We've had our boat over twelve years and the only time we've ever used the horns is in fog or when we test them briefly every few months to make sure they still work. We've never used the horns in a passing or meeting situation and we've never heard any other boat do this either. Even the commercial traffic--- freighters, tankers, tugs and barges-- never seem to use horns in our waters. Of course they're all under the control of VTS so their communications are all being done via radio. The BC and Washington State ferries usually blow once just prior to departing a terminal but those are usually the only horns we ever hear during the year. (The ferries we've ridden after dark don't blow at all which I assume is a noise-abatement thing.)

-- Edited by Marin on Monday 31st of January 2011 12:41:04 PM
 
Some of my dock mates, toot their horn when they exit our small basin.* It has a bit of a blind spot and enters the river into the channel thru a small slot.

The only time I have blown our horn is at the end of the fireworks on the 4th of July.

I still think air horns are cool. JohnP
 
Marin wrote:

Maybe this is just a PNW thing, but outside of horn use in fog, we almost never hear anyone use a horn up here. We've had our boat over twelve years and the only time we've ever used the horns is in fog or when we test them briefly every few months to make sure they still work. We've never used the horns in a passing or meeting situation and we've never heard any other boat do this either. Even the commercial traffic--- freighters, tankers, tugs and barges-- never seem to use horns in our waters. Of course they're all under the control of VTS so their communications are all being done via radio. The BC and Washington State ferries usually blow once just prior to departing a terminal but those are usually the only horns we ever hear during the year. (The ferries we've ridden after dark don't blow at all which I assume is a noise-abatement thing.)

-- Edited by Marin on Monday 31st of January 2011 12:41:04 PM
I'm with you Marin, I have been boating for 30+ years up here in the Prince William Sound. The only horns I ever hear are kids playing with the darn things.

I have used one of those horns in a can to tell the first mate when to start dropping the prawn traps.

*
 
Out my way, the Delta has many narrow, winding, dike- and tree-lined channels, and the SF Bay/Delta area*has periods of fog.* Also, my planned marina (Vallejo Municipal) is surrounded by a raised breakwater making it prudent to signal entering/exiting or closely passing by the entrances.** Also, I expect more yahoos out there (there were no such things as personal watercraft when I was last in those waters.)* *Having a capable horn seems prudent here.
 
How else are you going to get WAFI"S out of your way? After all, everyone knows that deep draft daysailors have the right of way...right?...right?

WAFI = Wind assisted F____ing idiot!
 
markpierce wrote:

Out my way, the Delta has many narrow, winding, dike- and tree-lined channels, and the SF Bay/Delta area*has periods of fog.* Also, my planned marina (Vallejo Municipal) is surrounded by a raised breakwater making it prudent to signal entering/exiting or closely passing by the entrances.** Also, I expect more yahoos out there (there were no such things as personal watercraft when I was last in those waters.)* *Having a capable horn seems prudent here.
I wonder if this guy honked as he passed by.

*
 

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Old Stone wrote:

Doesn't bother anyone, and each time I hear one that is coming out, it's fun to wave and find out when the next cocktails will be served. (Always look for the silver lining)
The reaction I have observed in our marina or in marine parks or wherever on the rare occasions we've heard someone use their horns is that everyone gets really pissed off and yells at the horn blower to shut the f_ck up.* The only exception has been when boats blow their horns after a 4th of July fireworks display.

Perhaps the difference is the same as why you hear horns all the time in east coast cities and almost never in Seattle, Bellingham, Vancouver, etc?* Beats me.....

Our boat has very loud dual air horns but other than in fog we'd be served just as well by leaning out the cabin door and saying "beep."
 
AT anchor in heavy fog a horn might be useful.

A cheap electric horn will take less power than a compressor and real air horn.

Anchored with the engine off gives your ears a chance to hear oncoming boats, and 5 shorts is still a tool.
 
I have a weird horn problem. My cabin roof won't support my 350+ pound Leslie Tyfon 300 horn. Of course I'm also missing the 1.5" steam line to run the horn with.
aww.gif





The horn came off the 650' freighter "Marine Electric" which sank off Chincoteague VA in the early 1980's.

Ted

-- Edited by O C Diver on Tuesday 1st of February 2011 07:55:18 AM
 
Sailor of Fortune wrote:

How else are you going to get WAFI"S out of your way? After all, everyone knows that deep draft daysailors have the right of way...right?...right?

WAFI = Wind assisted F____ing idiot!
They have the right of way until they learn the Gross Tonnage Rule.

I had trouble with them when I*was one.* Some are just plain stupid.*
 
They don't have the right of way- Cannot impede traffic in the channel. It is a summer routine to see large container ships transitting Ambrose channel trying to move small sail boats out of their
way.
Common sense is not that common.
 
As mentioned in a previous discussion I would install a 30W loud Hailer the includes the bell and whistles for fog before an expense horn.*

Jack are those HOOTER girls?
 
"Jack are those HOOTER girls?"

Or more appropriately for this thread..TOOTER girls.
confuse.gif
 
Those Are the Hooter girls! As you can see, I upgraded my crew. This picture was taken in Norfolk,Va around 4 years ago. To bad I wasn't working on this tug back then!
Now all I get is pimply faced kids in baggy pants and old farts like myself!
 
Phil Fill wrote:


As mentioned in a previous discussion I would install a 30W loud Hailer the includes the bell and whistles for fog before an expense horn.*
One advantage of vessels under 12 meters in length is that they don't have to carry/use a bell.* By the way, what's the favored method for ringing the bell when anchored outside of a special anchorage area during times, day or night,*of restricted visibility?* I'd betcha*12-plus-meter boaters don't bother, or for*that matter, most anyone*making any sound, such as a horn with timer or not.

*
 
Old Stone wrote:

Hey Ted - You'd better hope Jay Leno doesn't see that horn! The way he love steam equipment he wouldn't stop 'till you sold it to him. Did you salvage this yourself?
Jay Leno is out of luck. Recovered the horn 10 years ago after several dives to free it from the wreck.

Ted

*
 
I love my horn.* I honk it any time a PWC gets within 100 feet of my vessell.
 
I love my horn. I honk it any time a PWC gets within 100 feet of my vessell.



A deck mounted swivel gun is even more fun!
 
Remember, you guys made me do this.

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FF wrote:
A deck mounted swivel gun is even more fun!
Wouldn't a pressurized water*system designed for washing deck and anchor have other useful purposes such*as keeping PWCs at distance?

*
 
I also have Kahleberg Horns (D0A) and am very happy with them.* Kahlenberg makes a 'chimetone' horn with several trumpets that will play a tune; if you visit their website you can hear a sound sample.* They also sell a neat switch that will automatically sound the required signals (underway, stopped etc.)* Their products and customer service are excellent.* Just sayin' as I have no other relationship with them execpt as a happy customer.
 
Avista wrote:

I also have Kahleberg Horns (D0A) and am very happy with them.* Kahlenberg makes a 'chimetone' horn with several trumpets that will play a tune; if you visit their website you can hear a sound sample.*
Regarding my D-1 horns: "Kahlenberg Chimetone Air Horns all utilize more than one projector or trumpet in their design. These projectors each produce a different fundamental frequency which combine to produce powerful, distinctive, musical chords. To hear a Chimetone Air Horn is to realize that the sound of a vessel can be one of its most impressive aspects. The Model D-1 Air Horn is designed for the most discriminating yachtsman. It is made entirely of bronze and brass, and is triple plated for a deep chrome finish."

Gee,*now I'm described as*"discriminating."


*
 
markpierce wrote:


Avista wrote:

I also have Kahleberg Horns (D0A) and am very happy with them.* Kahlenberg makes a 'chimetone' horn with several trumpets that will play a tune; if you visit their website you can hear a sound sample.*
To hear a Chimetone Air Horn is to realize that the sound of a vessel can be one of its most impressive aspects. The Model D-1 Air Horn is designed for the most discriminating yachtsman. It is made entirely of bronze and brass, and is triple plated for a deep chrome finish."

Gee,*now I'm described as*"discriminating."
I heard they are going through a re write of their promo as we speak.
wink.gif


*
 
I'd betcha*12-plus-meter boaters don't bother, or for*that matter, most anyone*making any sound, such as a horn with timer or not.
I too have found this to be true, but there is a huge potential cost of ignoring the Colregs.* In almost any collision, there will be a Coast Guard investigation, at which time questions will be asked that may not have a correct answer.* As an example, (this happened to a friend a couple years ago)* While on a charter fishing trip, drifting off shore and assisting clients on deck, fog was coming and going.* Suddenly, coming out of the fog, a 32ft yacht appeared, and was headed directly for the fishing boat.* Before the captain could react, the yacht hit the fishing boat in the Stb, aft corner.* Amazingly, there didn't appear to be anyone in the pilot house of the yacht until after the collision.* Three people went to the hospital, but fortunately no one was seriously injured, and neither boat sank.* During the investigation, my friend was asked if he saw the approaching boat on his radar, and of course he didn't since he was on the back deck.* He was also asked if he was sounding the appropriate sound signals, which he wasn't.* When asked why, he replied that the fog was coming and going quickly and it didn't seem necessary, In addition, he probably made a mistake when he mentioned that the responding C/G vessels were not sounding any signals either as they arrived.* He was cited for failure to maintain a proper lookout, and not sounding the proper sound signals.* This was despite the fact that he was drifting with the engine off, and the other boat was on autopilot with no one in the pilot house.*

This is something I always mention to my students while on training charters.* If you are involved in a collision, you WILL be found in violation of one or more rules, no matter what the circumstances.* The fewer rules you have broken, the less liability you will have, but it's guaranteed you will have violated at least one, Rule 2, General Responsibility, or as it's sometimes known, the General Prudential rule.*

In broad terms, Rule 2 states that even if you are doing everything correctly according to the rules, should a collision be imminent, you are required to depart from the rules and do what ever is needed to avoid that collision.* If your in a collision, you obviously violated Rule 2.*

Having said all that, my practice is to always use the fog horn should I determine that a condition of restricted visibility exists* (determining THAT is a whole different subject, but basically if you think visibility may be restricted, it is).* In addition, I log use of the horn in the log book, so I can prove that I make a regular practice of using it should a question arise.* As for other sound signals, unless I can see clearly in all directions, I sound the appropriate signal when backing out of a slip, rounding a blind corner or when ever deemed necessary.* As for other maneuvering signals, I rarely use them, as I doubt one in a hundred boaters would understand them. Instead, I make sure there is more than enough room to maneuver, or I make a passing agreement on the radio (also fraught with dangers of it's own).* Still, should a colision result.......well you get the idea.* ..........................Arctic Traveller

*


-- Edited by Arctic Traveller on Thursday 10th of February 2011 12:31:01 PM
 

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