Hey There Marin

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Doc

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My wife and I are collecting frequent flyer miles in excess of what we need so we are thinking about flying to Seattle and spending a week looking around. Our boat was born in the vicinity also.

Our question is "What is the best time of the year*to come where we can see our hands in front of our faces and not be*surrounded*by a*cold fog?"
 
Doc wrote:

My wife and I are collecting frequent flyer miles in excess of what we need so we are thinking about flying to Seattle and spending a week looking around. Our boat was born in the vicinity also.

Our question is "What is the best time of the year*to come where we can see our hands in front of our faces and not be*surrounded*by a*cold fog?"
DocThe cold fog occurs primariy in the fall. However, very low rain clouds can jump out from behind an island at any time of year or day. It's actually very creepy.
But..., if I were to choose, I would choose September. Yes, we do get a little fog around that time, but it is the least likely to be raining. July and August aren't bad either, but don't tell anyone.
I had to slip this bit of information in before Marin got hold of the thread, because you already know what he would say. HE IS MUCH TOO QUICK TO SCARE AWAY OTHER BOATERS!!! Don't tell him I let on to our secret boating times.
Carey

*
 
Hey Doc,
There is a Seattle boat show coming up in January. I don't know the date.
May be a fun time to go.

SD
 
skipperdude wrote:

Hey Doc,
There is a Seattle boat show coming up in January. I don't know the date.
May be a fun time to go.

SD
Skipper is right. January 21-30 is the Seattle Boat Show. In conjunction with that is the Lake Union (on the water) boat show. Given that it's a La Nina` year, it might be threateningly wet and or snowy however. You might want to dial 911 before you leave home.*

*
 
The PNW is a horrible place to boat. Stay home! Those from the NE would never survive here, the water doesn't freeze and you can cruise on Christmas Day. Those from Florida will miss the hurricanes, bugs and gators. Those from SoCal will get lonely and discover they have places to anchor and go*where there are no*other boats.

Don't come!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
I'm sure not planning on staying.

Sunchaser, are you from Oregon by chance?
 
The best time is lat July through mid September.*August is usually the warmest and least rain.* Sept is the best time to cruise/sight see as school has start and most boaters have put their boats away for the winter.* So the marinas and towns are not that busy/crowed.* The other times of the year are hit and miss.* Mostly miss! )-;

If you are in the Everett area, 30 miles north of Seattle let us know and we will take you out to eat at one of our family owned resturants.* Maybe make it a TrawlerForum thing.* I have done PMM, Roughwater and other group*TO DO'S.***There is a Trawler Fest I think the first week in June at Anacortas 90 miles North of Seattle, the gate way to the San*Juan Island which you can take a ferry to.** Might want to allow at least a week maybe two as there is a lot to see in the Seattle area.*

If you*don't want to get rained on then you have to learn how to run really fast or be able to walk inbetween the rain drops.* (-;*
 
DocI seems that everyone but Marin has posted on this, but don't fear, as he will return. He is in South Carolina on business at the moment, and apparently too busy to extoll on the splendor of Northwest boating.
 
Just bring your rain gear for marina searching , and your hunger for good sea food.
 
Doc wrote:Our question is "What is the best time of the year*to come where we can see our hands in front of our faces and not be*surrounded*by a*cold fog?"
Doc---

Everything everyone has posted up to this point is total bullsh*t.* Here's the straight scoop.

Don't come up here at all.* It drizzles constantly, Mt. St. Helens is forever covering everything with engine and lung-killing ash and is starting to show signs of firing off another massive eruption, it's foggy most of the time and if it's not foggy it's hellaciously windy.* Puget Sound lies on a major fault line and Seattle's crumbling infrastructure, most of it built in the first half of the 1900s, is predicted to collapse in a major way when-- not if--- the next large earthquake hits.* Which when you think about it comes a day closer to happening every day.* It's a big reason my employer is bulding a complete airplane manufacturing, assembly, and delivery facility in South Carolina.* We're hedging our bets against the next big Puget Sound quake.

Add to this the fact that the locals hate anyone who hails from south of the east-west line that is an extension of the southern Oregon border and east of the Mississippi River.* Anyone living outside that defined quadrant of the US is considered "The Enemy" and is treated accordingly.* Unless you're here to buy some airplanes in which case you will be treated extremely and genuinely nicely.* But if you're not coming up here to buy planes or negotiate a big contract with COSCO or one of the other big Chinese shipping companies that use the ports of Seattle and Tacoma, or the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, or Paccar (Kenworth trucks), your presence will not be regarded with much enthusiasm.

I've lived here for 31 years now.* It used to be that the period between July 5 and August 31 was considered the best time of year here in terms of sunny days, warmer temperatures, and nice weather.* However as I have stated in other discussions, I've noticed that in the past eight to ten years even that brief period of "good" weather during the summer is no longer dependable.* Last summer, for example, we didn't have a summer.* There was one week of what we consider hot weather (in the 80s-90s).* But the rest of the summer was cool, windy, and rainy most every day of the week.* I don't know if this is a result of global warming, global cooling, global tilting, global acceleration, global deceleration, or global indifference.* But it's been happening long enough for it to become a measurable trend.

So my advice (seriously) is don't waste your time or money coming to the PNW unless you actually want to be in cool to cold, wet, windy, gray, foggy weather.* For example, it's a great place to commit suicide and we have a number of bridges and railroad grade crossings that come highly recommended for this purpose and are used with great frequency.* I think there's even a guide book for them with maps.

Now if you happen to like non-stop overcast skies, low, gray cloud ceilings, and constant drizzle (as I do) then no problem, you'll like it here.* But if you want days of clear air, beautiful views, and sparkling water, these have become so hit-and-miss now that the chances are far greater that you won't have any days like this in a two or three week stay than you will.* Regardless of the time of year you visit.

In fairness, I should say that over in eastern Washington, east of the Cascades, they get a huge number of beautiful days even in the dead of winter.* It is horribly cold in the winter, but the number of sunny days in eastern Washington makes up the better part of the year.* So if you like wheat, wine, cattle, apples, alfalfa, cherries, potatoes, rolling hills, big rivers (albeit with lots of big dams on them), vast open spaces, mule deer, rattlesnakes, and Republicans, then you might want to consider eastern Washington instead of western Washington for your visit.

FF made mention of our seafood.* The truth is, it's crap.* Not because it actually is, but because we ship all the best stuff out.* Same as we do with our famous apples and cherries.* You are more likely to get fresher and better quality northwest salmon, crab, clams, and oysters in Wichita, Kansas than in Seattle.* Just like when I lived in Hawaii back when there was still a huge pineapple industry there.* The pineapples you bought in the local stores were mediocre at best because the best ones were all exported to the mainland or canned.

I just got back today from a week's filming and interviewing in our new 787 manufacturing facilities in Charleston, SC.* The seafood we had in the restaurants there made the stuff you typically get in Seattle restaurants seem like Mrs. Paul's fishsticks in comparison.

So the bottom line is, in my opinion, unless you have a burning desire to be in this part of the country (which is not the same thing as seeing it--- chances are you won't actually be able to see very much of it), there are about a zillion ways to spend your vacation money more productively and enjoyably.* Go to England or France or Brazil or Argentina or Italy or Canada (but not BC since they have the same weather we have minus the volcanic ash).

Go to Maine, for example.* Same fascinating coastline, same neat boats, but you can actually see it during the summer.* Plus they have lobster which we don't have.* The runner-up Pacific spiny lobster we get from Hawaii, Australia, etc. is a lobster in name only--- it's a poor substitute for a proper Maine (or Canadian Maritime) lobster.

Now there will be people on this forum who will write in great protest over what I've written here.* They will tell you the weather's not nearly as bad as I've portrayed it, the seafood is fantastic, the people are nice to out-of-towners, and so on.

They're lying.* The only reason they will tell you this is that this state is well on its way to bankruptcy just like California and anything that can be done to flim-flam* out-of-state suckers into spending money here will help stave off they day when we simply annex ourselves as a new province of China.* But I refuse to be pulled into that dishonest campaign.* So I'm giving you the straight poop here.* If your favorite color is gray, and your favorite feeling is wet, come on up.* Otherwise, you'll be a lot happier and get a much bigger bang for your buck somewhere else.



-- Edited by Marin on Monday 6th of December 2010 01:14:12 AM
 
I think Marin painted a very gloomy picture of the NW.* Perhaps a small photo essay will shine a kinder light on our area.* Or...maybe not.
 

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"Go to Maine, for example. Same fascinating coastline, same neat boats, but you can actually see it during the summer. "

But not often,

Maine , Cold , but its a Damp Cold , with 0/0 fog most every day.

Water temp is usually in low 50's for brisk swimming.
 
Marin and Tonic,
You guys are killing me! Great stuff!
 
FF wrote:

"Go to Maine, for example. Same fascinating coastline, same neat boats, but you can actually see it during the summer. "

But not often,

Maine , Cold , but its a Damp Cold , with 0/0 fog most every day.

Water temp is usually in low 50's for brisk swimming.
FF. You beat me to it.

<pre>"Out on the road, we tell all the turkeys
Yes it's always raining and the sun never shines
But all the natives know when the mountain lifts her skirts
The view from home will flat-out melt your mind"

From Bryan Bowers' "The View From Home"
</pre>

*


-- Edited by dwhatty on Sunday 5th of December 2010 07:48:41 AM
 
Marin wrote:



Don't come up here at all.* It drizzles constantly, Mt. St. Helens is forever covering everything with engine and lung-killing ash and is starting to show signs of firing off another massive eruption, it's foggy most of the time and if it's not foggy it's hellaciously windy.* ...
A typical day at Victoria BC, at harbor entrance:

232323232%7Ffp537%3C2%3Enu%3D3363%3E33%3A%3E57%3B%3EWSNRCG%3D34%3B29%3A%3B899336nu0mrj


*
 
"In fairness, I should say that over in eastern Washington, east of the Cascades, they get a huge number of beautiful days even in the dead of winter.* It is horribly cold in the winter, but the number of sunny days in eastern Washington makes up the better part of the year.* So if you like wheat, wine, cattle, apples, alfalfa, cherries, potatoes, rolling hills, big rivers (albeit with lots of big dams on them), vast open spaces, mule deer, rattlesnakes, and Republicans, then you might want to consider eastern Washington instead of western Washington for your visit."

Marin, I think that is the most accurate short description of where I live that I've ever seen.* But you forgot to mention that the population is almost all farmers, rednecks, offspring of dust bowl migrants and illegal Mexican immigrants.* According to my friends on the west side, you also automatically lose 25 IQ points once you cross the Cascades into Eastern Washington.* Feel free to come wine tasting, but just be aware that over 50% of the population doesn't have car insurance and 95% are carrying an unregistered concealed weapon.
Lyle
 
Most of you have seen the movie Twilight that takes place in Forks.* We watch Eclipse last night!* Well, that is what most of Western Washington looks like, cold and damp. There are small areas that are exception like Squim, that has the least rain fall in Western
Washington.* Its about 60 miles East of Forks, and across from VictoryBC that is protected by the Olympic Mountains.**Usually if there is blue ski*there is cold and high winds.**In January*for the Seattle boat/afloat*show*its*rainy and cold.**The last two years is snowed.*So you run from one boat to the next to get warm and*dry out!**

The sky*in the picture of*the Eagle*is a*typical day.

********
 
markpierce wrote:
A typical day at Victoria BC, at harbor entrance:
232323232%7Ffp537%3C2%3Enu%3D3363%3E33%3A%3E57%3B%3EWSNRCG%3D34%3B29%3A%3B899336nu0mrj


Doc

This photo of Marks reminds me that I failed to mention Victoria. If you have time, I'd recommend a boat ride. There are numerous commercial boats that make a regular run from Seattle, Bellingham and Port Angeles. They typically get a lot more sunshine the mainland Western Washington, and it's a gorgeous little harbor to wander around. Good eats too. The Bellingham runs take place on a 110 foot converted crew boat, with a very nice dinner served on the way back.

*
PS-The other thing you could do is take a flight from Lake Union in Seattle, on a Kenmore Air Harbor Beaver floatplane. You'll get a gorgeous look at the San Juan Islands, and a faster trip to Victoria. The only problem with this plan is finding a clear day to make the flight. We have three clear days scheduled next year, but they are applied randomly.


*


-- Edited by Carey on Sunday 5th of December 2010 11:13:35 AM
 
Carey wrote:

*
The other thing you could do is take a flight from Lake Union in Seattle, on a Kenmore Air Harbor Beaver floatplane. You'll get a gorgeous look at the San Juan Islands, and a faster trip to Victoria. The only problem with this plan is finding a clear day to make the flight. We have three clear days scheduled next year, but they are applied randomly.
Float-plane activity at Victoria is seemingly constant, much like Juneau (or is it*Ketchikan)*as pictured here.

232323232%7Ffp53833%3Enu%3D3363%3E33%3A%3E57%3B%3EWSNRCG%3D34%3B2%3A2868%3B336nu0mrj



-- Edited by markpierce on Sunday 5th of December 2010 11:33:53 AM
 
"Out on the road, we tell all the turkeys
Yes it's always raining and the sun never shines

This is the opposite of Bermuda where even in a hurricane the locals tell one how rare rain is and how delighted you should be to be seeing it actually rain!
 
Tonic wrote:

I think Marin painted a very gloomy picture of the NW.* Perhaps a small photo essay will shine a kinder light on our area.* Or...maybe not.

Lovely photos.* Really liked the one of Deception Pass bridge..........Arctic Traveller
 

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