Help with removing raw water intake hoses.

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dhays

Guru
Joined
May 26, 2015
Messages
9,168
Location
Gig Harbor, WA
Vessel Name
Kinship
Vessel Make
North Pacific 43
So I tore into my sea strainer and found that it was cracked. I believe that is the source of the leak. I will replace the sight glass and have one ordered.

I am going to need to remove the 2" hoses off the Groco strainer. I've not done it before and they have been there a long time. It looks like pipe dope or something similar was used when it was installed.

Any suggestions on how to get the hose off without having to destroy it?

If I do destroy it, what 2" hose would you recommend I get to replace it and where is a good source?

Given that the hoses are a decade old, is it wise to consider replacing them anyway?
 
Heat will often allow you to get the hose off without cutting it, but I would recommend replacing the hose after 10 years. Since there is suction and you don't want the hose to collapse, something like Trident 250 with wire between 2 plies of rubber will work well.

Dave
 
As mentioned above, it's probably a good idea to replace the hose if 10 years old.

For a field repair, I've had good luck with sliding a fairly small flat blade screw driver with rhe tip sliding on the hose barb, as far in as possible. Then using a plastic syringe to inject Dawn or other dish soap on either side of the screw driver. Pull out the screw driver and repeat the process 4 or 5 times, moving further around. Periodically give the hose a twist with a strap wrench.

Ted
 
I have a J shaped tool that I got at NAPA. It has a point on the end. I can work it in the hise and next to the barb fitting. Then use heat and work the J tool around the barb fitting breaking the hose loose from the barb fitting. I would probably njust replace the hose if it is getting old. I get mine from Defender because they sell it by the foot.
 
Cut the hose away from the fitting with a hacksaw. You can then try to rotate the hose to break the adhesion between the hose and the fitting. Add heat gun heat if necessary.

But new marine coolant hose. Buy softwall if it will only be straight. Buy Hardwall if you need to curve it. I prefer hardwall.
 
Great tips so far folks. Thanks. The hose from the thruhull to the filter is relatively straight and short. From the Filter to the engine though is another matter. Longer and some bends. So likely looking at wanting a wire reinforced hose. I think that is what is there now.

Thanks for the heat gun idea as well. I wouldn't have thought about that.

I'd like to make it less of a chore to removed the hoses in the future. So is there a sealant/lubricant that you can recommend that would help when it comes time to remove the new hoses? I was thinking Rectorseal 5. But I imagine any pipe dope would work?
 
Heat gun has worked for me.
 
I'd like to make it less of a chore to removed the hoses in the future. So is there a sealant/lubricant that you can recommend that would help when it comes time to remove the new hoses? I was thinking Rectorseal 5. But I imagine any pipe dope would work?
I use automotive hand cleaner without pumice, on bigger hoses for installation. It makes it much easier to put large hoses on. Secondly, I don't try to break the hose clamp over tightening it. Whenever possible, I double clamp and only tighten enough to hold the hose in place with it properly sealing. Crushing the hose to half its wall thickness, serves no purpose. Most of the hoses that aren't part of the freshwater coolant system, are either under very little pressure or operating in vacuum.

Ted
 
I have a J shaped tool that I got at NAPA. It has a point on the end. I can work it in the hise and next to the barb fitting. Then use heat and work the J tool around the barb fitting breaking the hose loose from the barb fitting. I would probably njust replace the hose if it is getting old. I get mine from Defender because they sell it by the foot.
Tjat is called a hose pick. They work awesome makes it very easy to remove hoses.
 
I took out the sea strainer today. Using the great advice, I started with a hose pick, then screw driver, then a little PB Blaster, followed by some heat and was able to get the hoses off the strainer without any damage to the hose. The sea strainer was really green so I used some dilute mercuric acid and stainless wire brushes and it cleaned up really well. I put it all back together and finally no leaks.

I need to buy 7 feet of hose to replace my old hoses but at least the boat is running, and running dry again. As always, thanks for all the help.
 
I use wet exhaust hose. If it has been on there that long, I would not bother trying to save it. In fact, I'd assume the hose is original and just replace it anyway. Cut it off, and install a new hose. You'll need a hack saw to cut the new hose.

Years ago, I was removing a sea-strainer to replace it. (The basket was rotten and I couldn't locate another one). In the process, the host from my seaock to seastrainer torn in my hands like old, rotted canvas. Someone has replaced all the hoses, except that one and it was a short, difficult to see section that even the surveyor had missed.

TLDR: Just cut it off and replace it.
 
Update:

I replaced the raw water hoses. Thanks to all the tips TFers gave me it went well.

I used Trident Flex ordered from Fisheries Supply. I actually ordered Siera Shieldflex 250 hose for $15.87/ft on their website. A couple days later they emailed me and said they didn't have the Shieldflex per foot and offered substitute the Trident Flex 250 instead. That was great. I orefer d the Trident anyway but it was $20/ft instead of $15.87/ft. They subbed the Trident at the Siera price. I have always been pleased with Fisheries service.

Anyway, I used a hose clamp as a guide and cut the hose with a sharp knife. I used a small bolt cutter to make a small snip at the end of the hose just back from where the wires exited the hose then pulled the piece of wire out with a pliers. A little Super Lube on the hose maid the cutting even easier. Those ideas I also got from TF. Heat gun and some pipe dope I happened to have on board made the assembly pretty easy.
 
Another question. I want to change the hose clamps. So if you were a cheap assed former sailor such as myself, and needed to buy 8 stainless hose clamps for the raw water hoses;

1. What you buy?
2. Where would buy/order them?
 
Not a sailor but I get the cheap part.
I recently purchased PYI clamps from Fisheries. These were tiny clamps for potable water. All stainless but easily deformed which proved unusable.

For raw water, they are likely much larger and hopefully more robust. Still, I broke form and bought the good AWAB clamps for our raw water hoses. Rolled edges, Non-perforated, you know the drill. I think I got them with a bunch of Yanmar parts from Tri-County in Bellingham because I was there. I encourage you to not go cheap on these critical clamps.
 
There are a couple places where cheap decisions can be expensive solutions. Hose clamps being one - go with AWAB clamps without perforations, or better yet for larger diameter such as 2-inch, tee-bolt clamps.

Peter

PS - electrical components such as breakers are another place I won't cheap-out. For me. Blue Sea whenever possible.
 
Another question. I want to change the hose clamps. So if you were a cheap assed former sailor such as myself, and needed to buy 8 stainless hose clamps for the raw water hoses;

1. What you buy?
2. Where would buy/order them?
I only use AWAB or ABA clamps. All 316S/S, no perforations on the clamp and rolled edges so as not to cut the hose. I get them from Defender or Jamestown Distributers.
 
FWIW, we've been able to source Scandvik ABA 316 stainless clamps in various sizes from Amazon...

-Chris
I've found this too and whenever I work on a hose with the original hose clamps replace them with the Scandvik ones. They are much smoother operating and allow for better clamping. Also, as mentioned above, putting Rectorseal #21 (which is black) on the fitting before putting the hose on. This makes removal easy and prevents weeping along the connection if the surface of the hose or fitting isn't perfect.
 
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