Help with boat selection

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Skippy jack

Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2023
Messages
19
Vessel Name
Eva D.
Vessel Make
Skipjack / Fisherman 25
Looking for advise on selecting my next boat.

I have another thread about insurance; and taking the advise from MVWEEBLES i'm starting a new thread to discuss boats i'm looking for my next chapter of life.
I currently own a 25' skipjack that i fish off of and spend some time on during the summer. Been some life changes that allow me to spend some more time on water. I'm now looking to up size and slow down.

I want to travel down the California coast, down the baja coast, make a hard turn to port and up the S.O.C.
I want to spend the cruising season down there, in May-ish when cruising season is over i will go back home and work (leaving boat till Nov).

So many questions, full displacement vs. simi.
Sedan vs aft cabin; single vs twin
I'm already exhausted

I'am a 50 year old male, been single for some time now. Travel with a 40lb. dog. Would like to have room for a co-captain should things change.

Important that i can single hand dock, however i plan to anchor out most of the time.

I'm looking at boats in the 35' range, single engine. I'm looking at boats that can be bought for $50,000 to $60,000 in good shape. Not bristle, but not junk either.
Boat will need 900nm. range, can stop in turtle bay but it may cost me $8 to $10 a gallon. I would really like to make it all the way to Cabo for fuel 733nm. is what i understand.

Boats i have been looking at are the willard boats, Roughwater 36', 37' and cailforian 34', cheoy lee 35' and more.

I know there's a lot of boats i'm over looking and a lot i haven't consider. This is where i could us some help.

Brian
 
Welcome Brian.

In my opinion, a sedan works well for traveling with a dog. Easy to get it on and off. I have a good friend with a Roughwater 37 - it's actually his second one. He regretted selling his first one many years ago so bought another 5 years ago. They are all fiberglass vs the R36 that has a wood deck house that was prone to rot. Most has a Perkins 6 cylinder and fairly economical. Very liveable layout.

Double enders like Willard are fine. But without a swim platform, a bit more difficult to board a dog from a dinghy. Not impossible - I knew a couple who cruised from California to Florida on a Willard 40 with their Leonberger, a fairly large dog.

Heading south is pretty straightforward and relatively painless. Headed north is a bit more prickly. Your post seemed to suggest your leave the boat somewhere south. As a suggestion, Mazatlan is a viable destination and fairly easy to cruise the SoC from there. I prefer it to La Paz.

Traditional tri-cabin trawlers such as the classic GBs are certainly workable and could board a dog fairly easily. Tealkbdecks will be hot and of course a maintenance item. Personally, I prefer shaded aft deck for sun protection so find tro-cabin boats a bit lacking for long term lives aboad.

Bayliner made a 38xx series boat that would be a great liveaboard. Engine room is tight with twins. I'd imagine finding one in good shape might be tough.

Finally, on the smaller size and thinking in a different direction, some of the smaller sport fish boats are workable. I forget the model names but both Uniflite and Bertram made some interesting boats in the 32-35 foot range. Would burn more fuel but might have enough advantage to offset.

Good luck.

Peter
 
We've found a swim platform -- and a transom door -- almost mandatory for bigger-than-purse dogs. Boarding there from some floating docks, boarding from dinghy, etc. If flybridge, we've also found stairs to the bridge almost mandatory too.

We prefer flybridge operations, but for single handing a lower helm with a side door would be nifty.

I think for initial shopping, I'd loosen your dollar target a bit -- just to learn what boats are out there and what features each might offer -- that you might need, want...

Then go back and work the cost issues once you've homed in on all available (within reason) candidates.

-Chris
 
Peter you bring up some good points, i need to put more thought into the ingress, egress form the boat. Especially from dingy or kayak. Sedan would seem like logical choice, this generally means your sleeping far forward. Is there much difference while on anchor between a stern cabin and a forward cabin?
While were on the subject of at anchor, is there a big difference between a full displacement (soft chine) vs. a more common simi plane (hard chine).

I know a bit about 20 to 30' planing hulls, but not much of it transfers over to the type of vessels i'm looking at now. I appreciate the help here.
 
is there much difference while on anchor between a stern cabin and a forward cabin?

If you hang out on the hook without a/c you will get much better ventilation sleeping in the forward cabin.

while were on the subject of at anchor, is there a big difference between a full displacement (soft chine) vs. A more common simi plane (hard chine).

The type of chine doesnt determine full vs semi displacement hull type, the shape of the hull does. Semi displacement hulls have a flat deadrise (the angle of the stern) that lets the hull plane. Full displacement hulls have a deeper angle at the stern.

David
 
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Peter you bring up some good points, i need to put more thought into the ingress, egress form the boat. Especially from dingy or kayak. Sedan would seem like logical choice, this generally means your sleeping far forward. Is there much difference while on anchor between a stern cabin and a forward cabin?
While were on the subject of at anchor, is there a big difference between a full displacement (soft chine) vs. a more common simi plane (hard chine).

I know a bit about 20 to 30' planing hulls, but not much of it transfers over to the type of vessels i'm looking at now. I appreciate the help here.

There are very few dull displacement hull boats out there so would severely limit your options if you excluded semi displacement.

Most folks like an aft stateroom with walk around island berth which is understandable. A few newer designs have an island berth in the v-berth.

On our Willard 36, we have v-berth bunks which work well for us though there is little other choice - the W36 is small compared to other 36 foot boats, and the W40 is also a bit small compared to other boats in its general class.

In the hot weather of Central America, sleeping on the v-berth is a god send because of the natural ventilation.

For boats with more of a planing hull, the bow area often has lifting strakes, steps in the hull to help it get up on plane. At anchor, some folks complain these strakes slap when there are small waves and interrupt sleep.

If your budget of around $60k is firm, your best choices are going to be in the trunk cabin design such as the Defever 41, Albin 40, etc. There weren't many Roughwater 37s made, but they would be very high on my list. A couple of them have had the flybridge removed to facilitate shipping and never had the flybridge replaced. I understand Ed Monk originally designed the boat without a flybridge but it was added for marketing reasons.

Peter
 

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The sedan style seems to check a lot of boxes.
Draw backs of sedan: one stateroom, no dingy storage on topside,


On the positive side: ability to fish off rear deck, with swim step and transom door make easy boarding, possible shade over rear deck,


Being in california i see a lot of Marshall boats or Californian boats. I know they were made in socal and i like the 34' sedan, i don't know much about them.

The Choey lee 35' sedan is also of interest, large built in glass tanks would be a plus.

I'am sure there's many more i'm not aware of.
 
Boat will need 900nm. range, can stop in turtle bay but it may cost me $8 to $10 a gallon.

Brian

Could always walk up to the gas station it’s cheaper. not sure if anyone pumping fuel if you anchor med style at the sketchy dock but that price seems a bit crazy to me? Even the dude I think Ernesto maybe on the barge that high yikes!

I would get a bladder before I just bought a boat on range alone it closes the door on some great boats.

Ps here’s my budget so cal current crush leaves room for mods, tankage, upgrades and dog accommodations.

https://www.boats.com/power-boats/2003-custom-sable-31-offshore-8800929/
 
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I grew up on a 34 Californian. My dad swore by the Marshall-built ones before they sold to Wellcraft. Very weatherly boat, solidly built, easy to one hand with twin engines and full walk around. Not much in the way of engine access underway and no keel to speak of for low speed tracking. Was an absolutely fantastic family weekender in Southeast Alaska but I’m not sure I would care to run 700 miles offshore in one (or that it would have the range to do it).
 
A few newer designs have an island berth in the v-berth.

We worked our way up from V-berths to Vs with inserts to island queen in the bow...

Not all they're cracked up to be. Ours in the previous boat was decent, but started to get old with climbing on and off... er.... several times per night. (One of the reasons we started shopping and ended up where we are now.)

The one we have now, guest stateroom in the bow, is much worse. Not enough step on either side to make the On/Off action easy. At least we don't have to use it...

And of course making up the bed -- while you're on it -- is goofy.

A low island queen, without so much storage underneath or at least with easy On/Off access, can be OK.. .but the definition of "low" might come into play.

-Chris
 
I grew up on a 34 Californian. My dad swore by the Marshall-built ones before they sold to Wellcraft. Very weatherly boat, solidly built, easy to one hand with twin engines and full walk around. Not much in the way of engine access underway and no keel to speak of for low speed tracking. Was an absolutely fantastic family weekender in Southeast Alaska but I’m not sure I would care to run 700 miles offshore in one (or that it would have the range to do it).

This is exactly what i'm looking for in feed back.
Years ago i bought a boat with the intention of operating it in the ocean. The boat i purchased was not intended for open ocean. The time i spent operating that boat was nerve-wracking. Later i upgraded to a larger boat that was intended for the water i wanted to be in.
I can't tell you what a difference that made in my enjoyment at sea.
I really don't want to go though that again, so i get on here read, ask a lot of questions.
 
Could always walk up to the gas station it’s cheaper. not sure if anyone pumping fuel if you anchor med style at the sketchy dock but that price seems a bit crazy to me? Even the dude I think Ernesto maybe on the barge that high yikes!

I would get a bladder before I just bought a boat on range alone it closes the door on some great boats.

Ps here’s my budget so cal current crush leaves room for mods, tankage, upgrades and dog accommodations.

https://www.boats.com/power-boats/2003-custom-sable-31-offshore-8800929/

I believe many of the boater will dingy to shore with 5 gal. cans and head to the gas station, not real close either.
When your the only fuel, right about the middle of a 700nm. passage i guess you get to charge what you want.

That little Sable is very deceiving from the outside, was not expecting it to so well finished on the inside. I do worry about steel boats getting thin over time, of course there are still some around that were built in the 50s.
 
They have a strong tradition of building good fishing boats from steel in the area. I would walk down there with a fine selection of hammers have a tap at it. see if it’s worth having it sounded by a professional. I like sleeping in a steel boat that can stop bullets worth grinding and painting all the time. I could see cruising up the Amazon with it spitting beetle nuts and eating pork sandwiches.
 
Looking for advise on selecting my next boat.

I have another thread about insurance; and taking the advise from MVWEEBLES i'm starting a new thread to discuss boats i'm looking for my next chapter of life.
I currently own a 25' skipjack that i fish off of and spend some time on during the summer. Been some life changes that allow me to spend some more time on water. I'm now looking to up size and slow down.

I want to travel down the California coast, down the baja coast, make a hard turn to port and up the S.O.C.
I want to spend the cruising season down there, in May-ish when cruising season is over i will go back home and work (leaving boat till Nov).

So many questions, full displacement vs. simi.
Sedan vs aft cabin; single vs twin
I'm already exhausted

I'am a 50 year old male, been single for some time now. Travel with a 40lb. dog. Would like to have room for a co-captain should things change.

Important that i can single hand dock, however i plan to anchor out most of the time.

I'm looking at boats in the 35' range, single engine. I'm looking at boats that can be bought for $50,000 to $60,000 in good shape. Not bristle, but not junk either.
Boat will need 900nm. range, can stop in turtle bay but it may cost me $8 to $10 a gallon. I would really like to make it all the way to Cabo for fuel 733nm. is what i understand.

Boats i have been looking at are the willard boats, Roughwater 36', 37' and cailforian 34', cheoy lee 35' and more.

I know there's a lot of boats i'm over looking and a lot i haven't consider. This is where i could us some help.

Brian
Brian,

I live in San Carlos Sonora on the Gulfo de California aka the Sea of Cortez. We also have an awesome Cheoy Lee 35 ft Pilothouse with paravane stabilizers and a great flybridge.
It has twin Ford Lehman 110 hp econo power engines with 650 gallons of diesel available in three fiberglass integrated tanks that have recently been opened, cleaned and inspected before being resealed at large inspection ports. It has an 8kw Inan generator and 400 watts of new solar panels and a 3kw inverter.
The boat is named "Ramble On" and is in Olympia, WA. We regret having to sell her but I lost my career at 58 due to mandates during CC times. Cruising half the year in PNW was our plan for early retirement and then enjoying our beach house in sunny San Carlos for the remainder of the year was derailed with loss of primary income.
She has great range at about 3 gallons to 4 gallons per hour at 7 to 9 knots. Giving her a 1500 mile range with plenty of reserves. With new lithium iron phosphate batteries and new 6v deep cycling flooded cells 10 in all, we have stayed on the hook 11 days without using gen set or shore power. A few more panels could even beat that, or the enhanced sun of Mexico.

It has diesel heat. But currently no air conditioning. It has many upgrades and is in your price range. Feel free to private message me here or email me at mexicoecoresort@gmail.com to learn more about her. She is not on the market yet, so you would be the first to look. My guess is the first serious buyer that does look will want to own her. She is rare and has one sister' ship in Rhode Island. If you want, I can send a couple or few links to YouTube to see her and her sister ship. We also have hundreds of photos to share.
I might even be able to help if needed to get her to SOC. Just let me know.

Captain DJ
 
Brian,

I live in San Carlos Sonora on the Gulfo de California aka the Sea of Cortez. We also have an awesome Cheoy Lee 35 ft Pilothouse with paravane stabilizers and a great flybridge.
It has twin Ford Lehman 110 hp econo power engines with 650 gallons of diesel available in three fiberglass integrated tanks that have recently been opened, cleaned and inspected before being resealed at large inspection ports. It has an 8kw Inan generator and 400 watts of new solar panels and a 3kw inverter.
The boat is named "Ramble On" and is in Olympia, WA. We regret having to sell her but I lost my career at 58 due to mandates during CC times. Cruising half the year in PNW was our plan for early retirement and then enjoying our beach house in sunny San Carlos for the remainder of the year was derailed with loss of primary income.
She has great range at about 3 gallons to 4 gallons per hour at 7 to 9 knots. Giving her a 1500 mile range with plenty of reserves. With new lithium iron phosphate batteries and new 6v deep cycling flooded cells 10 in all, we have stayed on the hook 11 days without using gen set or shore power. A few more panels could even beat that, or the enhanced sun of Mexico.

It has diesel heat. But currently no air conditioning. It has many upgrades and is in your price range. Feel free to private message me here or email me at mexicoecoresort@gmail.com to learn more about her. She is not on the market yet, so you would be the first to look. My guess is the first serious buyer that does look will want to own her. She is rare and has one sister' ship in Rhode Island. If you want, I can send a couple or few links to YouTube to see her and her sister ship. We also have hundreds of photos to share.
I might even be able to help if needed to get her to SOC. Just let me know.

Captain DJ
Hi, Captain DJ. We're interested in your Cheoy Lee and wondering if she's still for sale. Also, if you had any links on you tube or otherwise, we'd love to see them. Thanks, Mike
 
Mike,

This is what she was like when we bought her:
Here is a sistership in Rhode Island that has been renovated over 6 years:
Here is another one of her same sistership in Rhode Island:

We have not listed the boat officially as of yet. We are in Olympia and plan to cruise Desolation Sound and the Sunshine Coast this season.
Are you in the PNW area?

Email me at mexicoecoresort@gmail.com
Or call at
256-303-0389
Thanks 😊
 
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Just a few images.
Corrections: it is an Onan genetic, 8kW.
Mastervolt 4 kW inverter,
Replaced cables, lugs and terminal blocks on house bank 2 of FLA 6v GC2 batteries, two Tecma freshwater flush MSDs.
The paravane stabilizers work great and would easily cost $30-50k to add to a trawler in today's economy. They help stability in motion or at anchor without the expense of maintaining hydraulic systems on active fin stabilizers.
 
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