Duracell batteries suck

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Is it just me, or do Duracell batteries leak 100% of the time. And I really mean 100%. I have not encountered a single one in the past few years that hasn't leaked, often ruining whatever they were in. I have completely stopped using them because they are pretty much guaranteed to ruin whatever you put them in. I just finished attempting to recover a really nice flashlight. F-ing Duracell batteries, dated for 2014 expiration leaked all over the insides of the flashlight.


Years ago I used ONLY Duracell because they were the battery you could count on NOT leaking. Now it's just the opposite. So annoying.
 
I have not correlated to Duracell. My thoughts are the warm humid environment of Florida, but could be brand. Never had these problems in San Francisco or Colorado.

For the most part, in hot climates, if you leave batteries in the device, you're eventually screwed. We've gone to old school ceiling fans and hard wired mini-split ACs as a result. A friend with a YachtMaster controller had gone through two in the last 6 years --- over $1k each.

But if you think it's because Duracell vs. Energizer (or Kirkland brand), I'd be open to try a different brand.

Peter ,
 
dated for 2014 expiration


Isn't this the issue? I've experienced some terminal corrosion when I found an old flashlight in the back of my tool box, but what are we entitled to expect?:ermm:
 
Isn't this the issue? I've experienced some terminal corrosion when I found an old flashlight in the back of my tool box, but what are we entitled to expect?:ermm:


I take that as it's shelf live. So a battery sitting in a flashlight, flashlight turned off (and rarely used), should be fine until the expiration date, right?


And I have had much newer batteries do the same thing.
 
I take that as it's shelf live. So a battery sitting in a flashlight, flashlight turned off (and rarely used), should be fine until the expiration date, right?


And I have had much newer batteries do the same thing.

You must have meant 2024 shelf expiration date
 
I know this isn't always the greenest crowd, but this is one more advantage to rechargeable batteries. Once you are willing to get into different battery types other than alkaline, your options for flashlights expand considerably.
 
I agree with the op. I am also shocked and disenchanted by the number of leaked alkaline batteries I have had.
 
I'm glad you're all talking about small batteries. I just replaced my 8d FLA start batteries with Duracell 8d sealed cell FLA batteries . . . . I certainly hope they don't start leaking!:eek:

House batts are LiFePO4, as I believe yours are as well Peter.

But on that note, I have never had a small battery, Duracell, or otherwise fail before it's expiration date. I generally buy either Duracell, or Kirkland (Costco) brand.
 
No you are not the only person.

I think it was about 8 or 10 years ago that this started. Prior to that rarely a problem. It seemed to coincide with the advertising on the package that they were now "mercury free". Was mercury the secret ingredient that kept them from leaking? I've had them leaking even in the unopened package with the best by date a full 10 years hence. Unfortunately, it isn't just Duracell, the Eveready seem to be about as bad. The least likely to leak these days are the cheap Chinese cells that are packaged as OEM in cheap consumer equipment.

Now, when I haul the boat, I pull the alkaline cells out of everything. It if leaks in a $2 remote control, that's one thing, but in say your $1400 Fujinons, that's another.
 
Duracell are the greatest!
They have a cute little bunny and a marching band.
What more could you want. :)
 
Duracell are the greatest!
They have a cute little bunny and a marching band.
What more could you want. :)

Actually Energizer has the bunny, not Duracell.
FWIW, I stopped buying alkaline batteries yrs ago. Only buy Lithium since they a) have a long shelf life. b) don’t leak (though terminals may corrode in extreme conditions.) I buy in bulk packs online, the initial price seems high but cheap when I factored in the cost and inconvenience of replacing electronics ruined by battery leaks.
 
I haven't used Duracell in probably 15 years, but not for the leaking reason. While not critical for most equipment, bunny batteries hold their voltage better through continuous use and then drop off quickly. Duracell tend to loose voltage in a more flat line while in continuous use. Devices without a Buck Boost circuit may not tolerate the dropping voltage as well. Nothing more annoying than working in a tight location with a AA flashlight that keeps getting dimmer with relatively fresh batteries.

My simple approach to leaking batteries is to change every 2 years unless they are in an item that consumes them more quickly. When I grab the multi meter, I need it to work, period. Part of my problem was stocking spare batteries on the boat. When the multi meter battery dies, the spare on the boat is already 6 years old. It's a toss up as whether it will die early or leak first. Put the spares in and buy new spares every 2 years. Keep a list of all the battery devices in the boat so that buying spares isn't a mind game of trying to remember all the devices.

Finally, while it may be wasteful to throw away perfectly good batteries, the every other year cost is dust compared to owning a boat, and I've already spent more on ruined devices than disposable batteries will cost for the rest of my life.

Ted
 
On the boat we only use lithium because the one alkaline cell that we leave in a remote or flashlight is absolutely going to be a gooey mess when we return in the fall.
 
The only time I’ve had Duracells leak is from running them down too flat and leaving them in the device. Some devices will continue to operate on reduced voltage without any indication to the operator.
I am much more diligent about not leaving batteries in devices if I’m not going to be using them.
Hmm, better check my flashlight…
 
I generally buy either Duracell, or Kirkland (Costco) brand.

Do you know who actually made the Costco ones? That's the problem with house branded anything, batteries or canned corn, you never know where it came from and the source can change as contracts expire and get rebid from other suppliers. I've heard for years that Sam's Club LA batteries were the best bang for the buck and I've bought many there, but that could change if they change suppliers.
 
I just use my battery of the month card at Radio Shack and replace the old battery.... :socool::rofl:

Not sure I have seen a difference in Duracell vs other batteries. I used to primarily use Duracell alkaline batteries, and they leaked, though I don't think I have had a problem, or much of one, with the D cells.

Now, I only use Duracell for D batteries, because I have a bunch of them, but I am transitioning to rechargeable D's. We have been using rechargeable AA and AAA batteries for years. Those seem to cause the most Duracell leakage, or maybe we used more of them, so had a better chance of seeing failure?

Later,
Dan
 
The only time I’ve had Duracells leak is from running them down too flat and leaving them in the device. …

This was me........until I moved to Florida and then bought a place in the Yucatan. Swollen batteries are now commonplace in my life which is why I suspect climate greatly exacerbates the problem. I've lost track of the number of AC remotes I've replaced.

TT - gotta ask.....what device was killed that prompted this thread?

Peter
 
I know this isn't always the greenest crowd, but this is one more advantage to rechargeable batteries. Once you are willing to get into different battery types other than alkaline, your options for flashlights expand considerably.


Have you found any particular brand of rechargeable AA and AAA that you like?
 
Actually Energizer has the bunny, not Duracell.
FWIW, I stopped buying alkaline batteries yrs ago. Only buy Lithium since they a) have a long shelf life. b) don’t leak (though terminals may corrode in extreme conditions.) I buy in bulk packs online, the initial price seems high but cheap when I factored in the cost and inconvenience of replacing electronics ruined by battery leaks.


I posted this in another forum, and several people there have taken this approach with good success.
 
This was me........until I moved to Florida and then bought a place in the Yucatan. Swollen batteries are now commonplace in my life which is why I suspect climate greatly exacerbates the problem. I've lost track of the number of AC remotes I've replaced.

TT - gotta ask.....what device was killed that prompted this thread?

Peter


Well, I've been meaning to post this for a long time, so don't read too much into the straw that broke the camel's back. It was one of these little LED flashlights with a removable 3 cell battery holder for AAA batteries. But this particular flashlight is a really robust one that I got from ABT. Very solid, just like their equipment. I keep it in a drawer in the pilot house for any quick inspection needs. I have similar lights scattered about the boat, and in every stateroom so a light is always close at hand.


Part of the challenge is the shear number of battery devices on the boat. I'll be going through to do a sweep of everything once I decide on a new battery strategy, but I would estimate somewhere between 25 and 50 devices, and that's just on the boat. I just counted 10 devices in the salon and galley alone.
 
This was me........until I moved to Florida and then bought a place in the Yucatan. Swollen batteries are now commonplace in my life which is why I suspect climate greatly exacerbates the problem. I've lost track of the number of AC remotes I've replaced.

TT - gotta ask.....what device was killed that prompted this thread?

Peter


For what it's worth, our boat sees pretty consistent and mild temps, as does our house. Typical temps never get above 80, and even that would be uncommon. And both spaces are heated in the winter so never below 55 or so, and high 60s when occupied.


It wouldn't surprise me if heat makes it worse, but in my case it shouldn't be much of a factor.
 
I moved to all rechargeable small batteries some years ago and in the long run, it's much better, hassle and money. I have a charger bank at home and a charger bank on the boat, and battery caddies (cases) in both places. I'm not tied to any particular brand and lately I get them from eBay, off-brands with weird names but they still work fine, and the prices are almost as low as retail store alkalines. I have had a couple rechargeables leak, it does happen, but it's very rare. I have noticed rechargeables go dead from time to time. I have a sophisticated batter charger at home with a condition readout and I'll stick a battery in and it won't be recognized, the display will just stay blank or say "null." After some surfing on YouTube I got the tip to use a 9v battery and cross-connect the dead battery to opposite poles of the 9v (with alligator clips and a couple wires) and the AAA or AA batteries get shocked back to life. They say you can't keep doing that, that'll fry a battery eventually and it's only a temporary fix, but I haven't noticed that at all.
 
I don't find this to be specific to any one battery manufacturer. The only time I have an issue is if I leave the batteries in a device for too long. So now I remove batteries from anything that is going to sit for any length of time.

I remove batteries from everything on the boat at the end of the season. At the beginning of the season, everything gets fresh batteries. This means I swap batteries about every 6 months or as needed.
 
On the boat we only use lithium because the one alkaline cell that we leave in a remote or flashlight is absolutely going to be a gooey mess when we return in the fall.

Agreed, for crucial or expensive devices (e.g. autopilot remote) we only use Lithium batteries, which come in most sizes now. So far none has leaked (and supposedly they won't).
 
For those fortunate few who say they never had an alkaline battery of the AA, AAA, S, or D size leak, I can only guess that you never let them sit in a device well past expiration date and that you don't have lot of devices hidden away like I do. I like to clip the single battery flashlights all over the boat, and then there are to hard to replace remote controls in the home, some for guest room TV and the like which can go a long time between uses. It is fall better for my use model to put the lithiums in everything that has a need to contain a battery at all times. Some items like hurricane items can have the alkaline batteries out of them but stored alongside until the big storm comes, but under no circumstances will I leave alkaline batts installed.
 
The only time I’ve had Duracells leak is from running them down too flat and leaving them in the device.

That used to be true for me. Not recently. As I said, I've found them leaking in the original sealed packaging, many years before the best by date.

Rechargables do not seem to leak, but the ones available for say AA cell replacement are NiCad or rechargable alkaline, and seem to self discharge fairly rapidly. Lithiums seem to be good (other than the price) but for some reason, some equipment says "do not use lithium batteries" in the instructions. Not sure why - higher internal resistance?
 
Great thread. I've had a VHF battery holder and a stabilized binoc battery holder ruined by leaking Duracells.

I'm glad to know about the lithiums- got them on the list for the next trip to BJ's.
 
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