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Scoid

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Aug 20, 2021
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56
Oh boy. This should be interesting.

The most knowledgeable person I know says my 1988 GB32 does NOT have cored decks. This is contrary to the accepted wisdom, but remember when everyone thought blisters were life ending?

So, is there anyone who has actually seen the cross section of a late model (85-95) GB32 deck. I’ve read all the posts that parrot the common assumption. I’m looking for someone that has actually seen for themselves what the 32 has.

Trying to decide how to proceed with deck repair/replacement so no speculation please.

Thank you,

James
 
Oh boy. This should be interesting.

......so no speculation please.
Everyone on here is going to tell you that they are cored, just like everything you found on the internet says they are cored. But you seem inclined to believe your friend, so there is only one way you can remove speculation. Drill into the deck and check for yourself.
 
Oh boy. This should be interesting.

The most knowledgeable person I know says my 1988 GB32 does NOT have cored decks. This is contrary to the accepted wisdom, but remember when everyone thought blisters were life ending?

So, is there anyone who has actually seen the cross section of a late model (85-95) GB32 deck. I’ve read all the posts that parrot the common assumption. I’m looking for someone that has actually seen for themselves what the 32 has.

Trying to decide how to proceed with deck repair/replacement so no speculation please.

Thank you,

James
 

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Everyone on here is going to tell you that they are cored, just like everything you found on the internet says they are cored. But you seem inclined to believe your friend, so there is only one way you can remove speculation. Drill into the deck and check for yourself.
I'm inclined to believe whom ever has actually seen one. Everything I've ever found anywhere, including here, is not empirical. And I may have to core it, but wouldn't it be smarter to try to find someone who's actually seen one first?
 
Aloha Ray,

Mahalo plenty!

I know for a fact that 42s are cored but that's an interesting pic. Any idea what that core material is? Kinda looks like teak but that doesn't make a lot of sense.
 
There are multiple core materials. My previous 1981 Island Gypsy, in many ways a GB clone, had (original) foam cored decks. You`ll be lucky if yours are, but it`s not likely.
 
Pull up one of you deck fills and have a look. Probably a good time to reseal them anyway.

Look for one you have access to from underneath...sometimes you can see the deck layering just from there, if not it allows you to pull the fitting all the way out for a good look.

Just remember about 95% of people that are knowledgeable about boats may be about a few things, rarely everything so take no one for their word without meticulous verification.

One big issue here is there is a problem with what many called "cored". Many older trawlers had teak, some teak, probably plywood laid down with some thin glass on top, then screwed down teak decking over top. It may or may not have some sprayed on gel coat underneath. I would NOT call this a cored deck, but I believe some do so this is why you get a variety of answers.

I can't say for sure whether your particular boat has what .....so like I said, believe no one till you confirm yourself...but there is no reason most of the time to do a new coring if you have multiple attachments to your deck already. Look around all your current fittings that penetrate the deck and see which one gives you clues or is the easiest to remove.
 
Aloha Ray,

Mahalo plenty!

I know for a fact that 42s are cored but that's an interesting pic. Any idea what that core material is? Kinda looks like teak but that doesn't make a lot of sense.
“Sandwich” top to bottom: teak, fiberglass, mahogany?, fiberglass.
 
Pull up one of you deck fills and have a look. Probably a good time to reseal them anyway.

Look for one you have access to from underneath...sometimes you can see the deck layering just from there, if not it allows you to pull the fitting all the way out for a good look.

Just remember about 95% of people that are knowledgeable about boats may be about a few things, rarely everything so take no one for their word without meticulous verification.

One big issue here is there is a problem with what many called "cored". Many older trawlers had teak, some teak, probably plywood laid down with some thin glass on top, then screwed down teak decking over top. It may or may not have some sprayed on gel coat underneath. I would NOT call this a cored deck, but I believe some do so this is why you get a variety of answers.

I can't say for sure whether your particular boat has what .....so like I said, believe no one till you confirm yourself...but there is no reason most of the time to do a new coring if you have multiple attachments to your deck already. Look around all your current fittings that penetrate the deck and see which one gives you clues or is the easiest to remove.
Interesting that you wouldn’t call a lamination of FRP, wood, FRP a cored deck. I would call anything cored that is not solid glass. Beyond that it’s a question of core material which can be wood (all kinds), foam, manufactured honeycomb, etc.

I’ll bet this distinction in definition is why this one person is saying the GB deck isn’t cored.
 
Trying to decide how to proceed with deck repair/replacement so no speculation please.
As mentioned, the only way to do it without speculation is to examine your particular deck and see what you see.

The sample picture seems to show what I would expect, which is cored construction with what looks like blocks of mahogany scrap used for core. Very plentiful around an Asian yard that builds mahogany interiors, and thus ‘free.’ It would also be quite possible to drill into such a deck and hit one of the gaps between the core blocks and then think for all eternity you had proof the decks were not cored.

Or just keep asking the internet until you decide to believe someone. Not trying to be a jerk, just a pragmatist. (My wife doesnt always believe that, either;)
 
Interesting that you wouldn’t call a lamination of FRP, wood, FRP a cored deck. I would call anything cored that is not solid glass. Beyond that it’s a question of core material which can be wood (all kinds), foam, manufactured honeycomb, etc.

I’ll bet this distinction in definition is why this one person is saying the GB deck isn’t cored.
I may have not been clear... my deck and on other older TTs (like the superstructure construction) there was exterior glass but no additionl FRP layer underneath to make it "cored". Which in my mind, "cored" is made for structure and these older boats were just made differently.

The good news was on my boat, once the teak deck was eliminated, the teak plywood underneath dried out (no glass on the bottom) and retained it's strength so a complete deck rebuild was not necessary.

A lot of people tried to argue with me on TF...but I won out because I did my homework and tore into my problem to see what was actually there.

The subsequent owner and several surveys all confirmed.
 
This isn't directly helpful to the OP, but FWIW this is what my 1982 42CL looks like at the fuel fill.
 

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If you own a GB, you need to rebed the deck fills anyway- a hateful job in most cus there’s little clearance between tank and deck inner skin. You can remove and properly seal the core with epoxy while they are out.
 
Your GB32 deck is cored - cored with plywood. On top of the plywood will be a layer of fiberglass and then the teak glued & screwed down. Same as my old GB36. Crawl into the engine room and then get over to the underside of the side decks (usually doable just forward of the fuel tanks.). You will be able to see & touch the plywood. And excellent advice to pull & re-bed fuel fills & any other fittings in the deck. The fuel fills leaking is what kills fuel tanks in GBs.
 
I have a 1976 (early fiberglass model) and has a cored deck. Another quick place to look for your own personal verification is the anchor rode deck pipes, on mine with the deck cap off the coring should be quite visible.
 
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