CRC Marine Heavy Duty Corrosion Inhibitor

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Larry M

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A friend gave us a 10 oz spray*can.* He swears by it.* Any suggestions on what to and what not to to use this stuff on?* Is it any good?
 
Larry M wrote:
A friend gave us a 10 oz spray*can.* He swears by it.* Any suggestions on what to and what not to to use this stuff on?* Is it any good?
*There are several different companies that make corrosion inhibitor spray from moderately helpful (WD40) to really good (Mercury corrosion guard). They are designed to leave a film that inhibits corrosion on surfaces that rust. Areas that come to mind would be hardware made of steel that may not be painted such as motor mount bolts. Also, if you replaced a starter and chipped the paint off the bolt heads, spraying the heads would slow or eliminate the rusting. Some of the sprays leave a thick film that attracts dirt.

I would avoid using it on engine parts that get really hot like where the paint burns off the manifold. Also, wouldn't use it on things that move like shifter linkages. There is a specific spray for battery terminals to prevent corrosion, the name escapes me.

*

In general I don't use the stuff much, preferring to keep things painted as much as possible.
 
A few years ago Practical Sailor magazine tested a bunch of corrosion inhibitor sprays like Boeshield and Corrosion Block. I think they decided CRC Marine Heavy Duty Corrosion Inhibitor was very good and inexpensive. I'm not fond of it as it stays sticky and it will get on you if you brush against it. I like Boeshield as it drys to a more wax like finish and is cleaner to deal with. Boeshield is probably not as effective as the CRC product.
 
Any suggestions on what to and what not to to use this stuff on?

Anything you will be painting in the future,
 
If you have a dinghy with an OB, I'd spray everything under the cowling. As has been mentioned this stuff stays tacky so don't use it on anything you are likely to get near often.
 
I use it just on open electrical connections/buss bars/batt terminals.* I have also used it on engine isolators but have switched to grease.

The Sea Ray dealership (as in new Sea Rays) used it extensively in the same ways...there is a better subsitute for batt terminals (reddish and better for acid neutralization I think) but the heavy duty corrosion control works good enough for me.


-- Edited by psneeld on Friday 3rd of February 2012 07:13:40 PM
 
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