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geezer

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We are replacing*the refrigerator*in our 37' Puget Trawler and replacing some crap molding with the original* teak "fiddle"--the ledge that keeps things from falling on the floor.* The only problem is finding the same kind that matches the rest of the boat.* Would anyone have any ideas where to find something like this? Does anyone make this anymore?
Thanks for any ideas,
Geezer
 
Can you post pictures of the items you are talking about?
 
Geezer: See if you can find some "old/aged" teak. There is a second hand store in your area and a few between there and Seattle. You may have to hunt a bit but you should be able to find some that can be cut to size. We added drawers in the galley a few years ago to Hobo. At first the wood looked a little to new. After a few months it aged and now it looks like it was part of the original.

Larry/Lena
Hobo KK42
Huatulco, Oaxaca, MX
 
Geezer,
You may want to get in touch with Superior Marine Services in Kemah Texas. I recently enlarged our Microwave opening and wanted to match the existing trim. The owner is a younger guy (can't remember his name) and very talented. He was very reasonable and has a heck of a shop. I left a sample with him to pull a profile from and he ran about 10' for me by that afternoon. Might possibly be able to work with him long distance.
 
geezer wrote:

Would anyone have any ideas where to find something like this?

In Bellingham try Pacific Marine Exchange.* They have a lot of various pieces and lengths of teak down in the basement.

There is another company in Bellingham I've been told about but never used. It's called Targo: Hard Woods to Get.* http://www.targowoods.com/

In Seattle the best source for teak that I've found is Homebuilders Supply on Nickerson Street near the Ship Canal just east of the Ballard Bridge.* They have all sorts of great wood in the basement.
*
 
All good suggestions, thanks. I'll begin at Pacific Marine tomorrow and work out from there.
Tony, with Woodsong had a picture of his galley before he refinished and the fiddle was exactly like ours. I tried to bring up the picture again but all I could find was his finished galley. (a beautiful job, I might add) I sent him a message in case he had a piece left over but guess he didn't have any.
Anyway, this gives me some avenues to pursue--thanks a million,
Dave
 
Hey Dave! Got your other PM today. I swear I brought those old fiddle pieces home but for the life of me I can't find them. They may still be in the boat? I'll check up there this weekend and let you know-can't find them at the house.
 
Woodsong wrote:

Hey Dave! Got your other PM today. I swear I brought those old fiddle pieces home but for the life of me I can't find them. They may still be in the boat? I'll check up there this weekend and let you know-can't find them at the house.
DaveI have one section around 48", and another couple around ten inches each. Give me a call at 360-815-2797. I am here in Bellingham, but won't be available Thursday and Friday. Catch me anytime Saturday, and we can meet at the boat and see if it will work for you.*

*
 
If the desire is to keep stuff inside the fridge , the RV folks have shelf rails that telescope to fit most boxes.
 
speaking of fiddle rails.

*Do any of you who have rebuilt your galleys with granite thought of installing the fiddle rails?

It would seem easy with a man made counter top not so with granite. Unless there is a good glue to stick wood to stone. Or stone to stone. *all thou a large bull nose would probably work as a fiddle Rail.

sd
 
they could epoxy granite "rails" to a granite countertop but I have absolutely no need for fiddles on our boat due to where we will be cruising 99.999999999% of the time.
 
What about resale?

I'll bet you dollars to donuts you will get caught out in the snot sooner or later.

SD
 
The following is a formula from a 1907 copy of Henleys book of formulas

for gluing stone to stone.

Flour of sulphur 1 part.
*hydro chlorate of ammonia 2 parts.
16 parts* iron filings.

The above substance must be reduced to a powder, and securely preserved in a closely stoppered vessel.*

when the cement is to be employed, take 20 parts very fine iron filings and one part of the above powder;

mix them together with enough water to form a manageable paste.
this paste solidifies in 20 days and becomes as hard as iron.

I wonder if it would work?
turn of the century chemistry.

SD

-- Edited by skipperdude on Thursday 27th of January 2011 01:55:13 PM
 
honestly, how many times have folks been in weather that made them think, "by golly. I sure am lucky I have those fiddles on the galley counter!" Usually if weather is that adverse, you are putting stuff away in advance. But, we're on the TN River. We don't have 15' waves around here and the likely person to buy my boat next is another coastal cruiser, someone on the river system, or someone doing the loop. For travel such as that, I just don't think fiddles are necessary, but that is just my opinion. :)
 
our fiddles were essentially rendered useless when the PO glued a butcher block counter top on top of the original laminate.* I haven't really seen much use for them on the trawler.* They were mighty handy on the sailboat when we had to make food regardless of the conditions (ocean racing).* Hopefully I won't be out in conditions like that in this boat but if I redo the counter I'd be inclined to utilize the fiddles again.* would depend on counter top material*though. Friends have a corian like counter with molded in*(??) fiddles.
 
Woodsong wrote:

honestly, how many times have folks been in weather that made them think, "by golly. I sure am lucky I have those fiddles on the galley counter!" Usually if weather is that adverse, you are putting stuff away in advance. But, we're on the TN River. We don't have 15' waves around here and the likely person to buy my boat next is another coastal cruiser, someone on the river system, or someone doing the loop. For travel such as that, I just don't think fiddles are necessary, but that is just my opinion. :)
Gotcha.* *I wasn't aware of where it was you lived.

Aside from boat wakes.* You probably never met a wave you didn't like.

SD*


*
 
for ocean going cruising, sailboats, LRC's making open passages, etc. I see their purpose 110%. I just don't see it on our trawler. Reality is that due to the particular layout of our galley, she has substantially less counterspace than her sisterships to the point I found the fiddles ridiculous. Without them, and going for a solid counter top, and I'll have to measure to confirm, but I swear it feels like we nearly doubled our countertop space. Just like our trawler had a manual hand water pump @ the galley sink that was never used, I think the fiddles were a carry over from sailors converting to trawlers. If my boat ever sees 15-20 waves I dearly hope that I am NOT on board. The Monk 36 is just not meant for that type of seas IMO, though I am sure it would survive but really- too many salon windows to be in truly large open seas.
 
Comm'on bro.**A good 15 footer will let you know if you are alive or not.

It's the constant pounding from the 6 to 8 footers that get tiring.

Come on up to Ak. I'll take ya fishin. Where the wind doesn't not blow to much.

No fiddiling.


SD
 
skipperdude wrote:


No fiddiling.

You know- I'd LOVE to get back up to AK and do some fishing. *I spent a few months up in AK back in my college years bumming around and last time my wife and I went up there aboard a cruise ship compliments of Holland America- I kept watching all the trawlers and motoryachts wishing we were aboard our own ride! *

And I hereby nominate the phrase "NO FIDDLING" to be the official TF jargon to mean "I am serious, no kidding around." *I hereby propose we all commence to implementing this new phraseology given to us by our esteemed SD.

*
 
Woodsong wrote:

*
skipperdude wrote:


No fiddiling.
http://imgres?imgurl=http://www.dji...a=X&ei=NPNBTZ-YE4G4sAPp2Yy8Cg&ved=0CB0Q9QEwAA

You know- I'd LOVE to get back up to AK and do some fishing. *I spent a few months up in AK back in my college years bumming around and last time my wife and I went up there aboard a cruise ship compliments of Holland America- I kept watching all the trawlers and motoryachts wishing we were aboard our own ride! *


And I hereby nominate the phrase "NO FIDDLING" to be the official TF jargon to mean "I am serious, no kidding around." *I hereby propose we all commence to implementing this new phraseology given to us by our esteemed SD.

*


That really cracks my ass up.

*


-- Edited by skipperdude on Thursday 27th of January 2011 04:41:13 PM

-- Edited by skipperdude on Thursday 27th of January 2011 04:41:55 PM
 

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Cary, I'll be at the boat show in Seattle Saturday but I'll have my boat partner call and set up a time to meet you.

Thanks for the reply Tony--if you do find some give me a yell, I may still need more. We have another piece that should be replaced. Some people just shouldn't be allowed near a boat with a saw --no fiddiling
smile.gif

Geezer
 
Should we have a referendum on the spelling....fiddiling or fiddling....?
 
I have absolutely no need for fiddles on our boat due to where we will be cruising 99.999999999% of the time.

'Cept when some tug is deadheading home , on the bosses fuel, and tosses a 6 ft wave.
 
Unlike Tony, my counter replacement, in White Quartz, will have teak fiddles. The old fiddles coming off broke to bits too small to be re-used, so I have cut new ones. Not a difficult task, needs only moderate skill with power tools. The new fiddles will be glued to the front edge of the quartz, and are deepenough to attach to the front edge of the old plywood countertop that remains in place to support the Q.

When I get the counters done I will post a pic.

The most difficult part of this reno was getting the teak trim off without breaking the veneer of the teak wall covering above and below the counters. Some extra covering trim will hide the places where it tore up a little.
 
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