Bent CQR anchor

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whichaway

Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2007
Messages
5
I have* a 45 lb CQR anchor which has a bend in the shank of about 25 degrees along with a slight twist.* Is it possible to have it straightened without affecting*its strength?
 
I think the main problem you will have is if its not straight is*it will not set or hold.
You could try heating it then it might bend???

-- Edited by troy994719 at 09:56, 2007-12-07
 
Is it a true tademarked CQR or a knockoff? If it is a real one I would check to see if it has any sort of lifetime warranty on it. It just might considering how much they charge for those things. Other than that, I'm not qualified to answer yur question although I would iagine heat to weaken it a little more.
 
Heat would not be good for it. I would guess that you need to cold press it with about a 40ton press. Any machine shop would have one.

However, I would also first contact CQR and check into a replacement. Warrantee or not, I bet they would replace it. They don't want a bent one out there.
 
Hi Chuck

If it's mild steel it can be straightened cold. Heat will probably be needed if its high carbon or forged. If it's mild steel it will have a shank that is flat and looks like it was cut out of plate steel.
I see you have a large heavy boat and a large heavy anchor be prolly best. Consider the Forfjord Anchor. 75 to 90% of the fishing fleet sports one on thier bow here in SE Alaska. Never seen one with a bent shank. " Forfjord Anchor " on Yahoo search will deliver info.

Eric Henning
30'Willard
Thorne Bay AK
 
The Forfjord looks to be pretty much the same as a "Navy" anchor. In one anchor test I read a Navy anchor called the "Digger" failed to set at all in the tests and so could not be compared to the other anchors tested. I have not seen any other tests that included a Navy-style anchor in their tests, so I have no way of knowing how well it stacks up against other anchor types other than this one particular test.

The Navy anchor is popular on commercial seiners in this area, too, but when we were trying to decide what anchor we wanted to replace our Bruce with, the one person I asked about this style of anchor said the only reason they had one was because it was the easiest to stow.

It would be interesting to see a comparative anchor test that included this style of anchor--- there must have been more conducted than just the one I've seen. Perhaps this style of anchor doesn't really come into its own until it reaches a very large size and weight. It certainly seems to work on ships.......
 
RE: Bent CQR anchor and Forfjord (sp?)

As Marin knows the Forfjord anchors are heavy.* All you need is a 250# version (don't think they come much lighter) and 50 or 100 feet of 1" stud link chain, a bunch of 1/2" wire rope and one of those drummy things on the foredeck to wind it all up.* Let it free fall, it will either bounce or dig itself half way to China.* In either case your good for 30+ knots of wind and maybe a lot more.
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They do come in smaller sizes... mine is only 212 lbs
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Forfjord #18
 
Hi guys,
Yes. They do make Forfjords smaller. I have a 25# myself. I've never seen one smaller than that and at this time the smallest availible is 40#. There is a source for that anchor at $375. The anchor Chuck Miller will want is 65#. Yes indeed the fishermen do use those drummy things on the bow and thier boats stinkin anchor rode is not next to thier berth. Those drummy things cost about 2 to $3000 and require hydraulic power, however they can be ordered as electric ... then heaven help you unless you have the mother of all motors. The drummy things are welded aluminum, quite bulky and otherwise arn't very attractive. Craig Alaska is an hours drive from here and if you were to come up here and walk the floats with me you'll see 100 fish boats and 75 of them will have the Forfjord anchor. I don't think the fisherman set thier anchor. Unless a strong wind comes up they may not even use thier anchor. They just come into a cove, position thier boat and drop the whole rode in a pile on the bottom. They just sit there in that one spot. In the morning, there they are, in the same spot with the chain over the bow and perfectly vertical. When the weather's really nasty, however, there they are at anchor, most of then with the Forfjord anchor.
Willy
30'Willard
Thorne Bay Alaska
 
About Anchors, I have said this over and over again.

" If all else fails should the anchor".


Burial at sea.
Without a second thought , donate that bent CQR Anchor to Davy Jones *Locker so no body can get their hands on it.

Donald
Mainship 400
Andromeda
 
Gene, nice to see you post, long time.* You will have to being up todate on the restoring of the Steathbelle.


*
I would try a shop with a cold large ton press.* If you call QCR let us know what the say.* I also have a QCR that the shaft is slightly bend.* My main anchor is a 94 lb Forfjord that is popular in the PNW.* ****
 
Heat will allow it to be straightened , its forged.

Sell it to a smaller boat and move up 2 sizes.
 
whichaway wrote:

I have* a 45 lb CQR anchor which has a bend in the shank of about 25 degrees along with a slight twist.* Is it possible to have it straightened without affecting*its strength?
Folks around here would wedge it in the crook of a tree, chain the other end to their pickup truck, and hit the gas.
smile.gif


Me, if it doesn't have a lifetime guarantee, I would replace it.

*
 
Don,
Did you realize how old this thread is? It's been 3 years. That's fine to bring up old threads but the bent CQR is probably (hopefully) history.

Marin,
Do you now realize the Navy anchor and the Forfjord are quite different? The Bruce and other claws are heavy anchors and I've seen quite a number of them that have been bent but I've never seen a Forfjord bent. I also think the Forfjord can act like a Kedge and burry only one fluke. It could even be designed to do that**** ...I don't know but I'm quite sure a Navy anchor would not do that. I think the Navy anchor was designed to act like a bulldozer and plow as much of the bottom as possible. And I'm sure the forfjord was intended to set like a Danforth. They say the angle of the forfjord flukes (outward) is a very important dynamic part of it's abilities. Probably having to do w swinging on the hook. But the navy anchor is a bit like the Dreadnought but I think the Dreadnought is more like a Danforth. Anchors are like Ancestry.com**** ...all related. However, there's one not related to any other***** ....my XYZ. By the way I haven't got the new one yet.
 
nomadwilly wrote:

Marin,
Do you now realize the Navy anchor and the Forfjord are quite different?
Here'swhat I'm going by.* First illustration is from the Forfjord folks.* Second illustration is from the Defender on-line catalog and the item is called out as a "Navy" anchor.* They look very similar to me.* Defender also sells Forfjord anchors.

Now if a "Navy" anchor is defined as one of those Fisherman designs that is used* as an insignia or tatoo or shoulder badge or whatever with the fouled line around the shank, then yes, that's different than a Forfjord.

But the*term*"Navy" is also used to describe the type of anchor in the*Defender catalog.* I recall when we first met Carey with his lobsterboat he carred an anchor*of*the same design as the one*in the Defender catalog.* Carey called it a "Navy" anchor, too.



*
 

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Hi Marin,That thing those folks claim to be a Navy anchor most certainly is not.
My picture here is of a true Navy anchor. As you can see it's very much heavier than even a Forfjord. It's shank is shorter than any Danforth I've ever seen and even shorter than the Forfjord. I'm sorry but I have no other pics of a Navy anchor. I don't think they really set but I'm sure the flukes dig in and the anchor as a whole plows up a mass of bottom like a bull dozer w two giant fangs. I think this is the most popular anchor for large ships. The 2nd pic is of the boat w the Navy anchor.


-- Edited by nomadwilly on Wednesday 9th of February 2011 10:44:06 PM
 

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Marin wrote:nomadwilly wrote:
Marin,
Do you now realize the Navy anchor and the Forfjord are quite different?
But the*term*"Navy" is also used to describe the type of anchor in the*Defender catalog.* I recall when we first met Carey with his lobsterboat he carred an anchor*of*the same design as the one*in the Defender catalog.* Carey called it a "Navy" anchor, too.

MarinI still have the anchor as my stern anchor. It was listed on my survey as a Navy Babbit anchor. Big clumsy flukes. Very hard to set in well packed sand. It looks exactly like your second photo, but entirely different.*
no.gif


*



-- Edited by Carey on Wednesday 9th of February 2011 11:00:59 PM
 
nomadwilly wrote:Did you realize how old this thread is? It's been 3 years. That's fine to bring up old threads but the bent CQR is probably (hopefully) history.

I don't check dates, just answer what's near the top if I think I can help.

The OP is probably not the first or last person to bend an anchor so the topic is still relevant.* Actually, mine has a slight bend in the shank but I've never paid it any mind and it seems to work just fine..

*
 
Ron,
Didn't mean that as criticism at all. In fact its better to bring back an old thread because it has all that relevant information right there. Can avoid going through all the old stuff all over again. Your bend is probably fine especially since it works good. And since it works good I think your'e wise not to bend it back.
 
I never considered bending it back.* I have considered replacing it with the next larger size, but since I have never drug it (yet), it's not a high priority.

Actually, I did drag it once.* I bought the boat in early 2008 after owning a smaller sport cruiser and anchoring overnight dozens of times.* Thios boat was my first kept in a marina.* About June or so, a bunch of the marina folks decided we should go on a trip and we would anchor halfway there.* They decided we would raft up.* Understand that this would be six boats, all sport cruisers except mine, and we would be anchored and rafted in coastal South Carolina where there is no place without pretty strong reversing tidal currents.* I didn't think this was a good idea, but I was the rookie here so I went along.

I got to the meeting spot first (because I left several hours before the rest of them), anchored into the current, and put out about a ten to one scope.* The rest of the boats showed up and rafted to me, half on one side, half on the other.* Most of them got on my boat and we started diner.* After a while, one of the ladies said "Are we supposed to be this close to the shore?"

Well, we were dragging and heading down the river.* One of the more "senior" members of the group decided that we would be better off with him anchoring because he "had chain on his anchor".

To make a long story not so long, we broke up, he anchored, an hour or so later (after dark), I noticed that the whole raftup had drug anchor about 1/2 mile down the river and was headed for a private dock.

We all scrambled to break up, and I decided I was anchoring for the night alone regardless of what the rest did.* I also decided that no matter how long you've been boating, if I see a problem with it, I'm not doing it.
 
rwidman wrote:

....* I also decided that no matter how long you've been boating, if I see a problem with it, I'm not doing it.
True words of wisdom!***
 
I would'nt recomend either as a first choice. I had a Forfjord and tried it once on a fairly hard bottom in Rocky Pass. I tried an early XYZ and it bounced along the bottom and refused to set. Tried the Forfjord and it just draged along. Put out my small Danforth out and it hooked up right away. That thing has never failed. Sold the Forfjord to the Harbormaster in Thorne Bay for $50. My personal opinion on anchors are:

My personal opinion on anchors are:

Grade A * * ** Fortress. It earns this rating only if one excludes rocky bottoms. On any other bottom I think it's the highest performing anchor in the world. If you had a backup rock anchor (claw or maybe a Delta) you'd have everything coverd. Fortress is excellent at short scope. ****************************************

Grade B******* Rocna, steel Spade, Manson Supreme, Quickline, SARCA and SARCA Excel. All are good for all bottoms and have high holding power. The Manson and SARCA is better at short scope and the manson is cheaper. Spade is quite pricy. Sarca is super dependable.

Grade C******* Delta, Claws, Danforth and CQR. Good average performance for average conditions (or a bit worse). On long scope the Delta is above the rest on holding power and there is one Claw (Manson Ray) that could be in the "B" class but very expensive.

Grade D******* Oceane, Hydrabubble and Bulwaga.

Unless I've forgotten one or more all others are questionable in some significant way. Generally speaking a higher performance anchor can be considerably lighter and lower performance anchors need to be heavy. Notice I didn't mention the Danforth. Reason is that the most dependable anchor I have is a Danforth but it did badly in all the tests I've seen. I really don't know what to think. The Super Max seems like a super mud anchor but I don't know what to think of it otherwise. ALL THIS IS JUST MY OPINION. I really don't care if anyone responds to this post*** ...may be better if no one does but I'm open to PM.



-- Edited by nomadwilly on Thursday 31st of March 2011 09:27:33 AM


-- Edited by nomadwilly on Thursday 31st of March 2011 09:35:46 AM
 
diver,

In my own mind it's higher than that but I'm trying to recommend an anchor for you and the Danforth consistently rated very low (excluding Fortress) in the tests so I would feel guilty recommending it. But you have my own personal testimony that my Danforth has never failed. I can't imagine why all those Dans failed in the tests. Maybe it's a marketing thing as nobody except West Marine (I know there are others) seems to be marketing steel Dans and ALL the anchor tests are in magazines and they must have heavy allegiance to their advertisers. Also very few people want to say "this is great" when almost everybody else is saying "this is trash". There is a very strong mind-set to gravitate toward the newest and latest in this country and I seem to be one of the exceptions (most of the time). Old Dans are easy to find cheap and if you use one I'd like to hear how well it does. I don't think ther's many rocky anchorages around here but you should have an old claw handy* for the rocks when you find them. You want to have coffee at the New York Cafe? We have breakfast at the Pioneer at times too.We're coming to Ketchikan on the 12th and will probably be at the Yacht Club in Thomas Basin. However I may send Chris on by herself on the ferry to avoid weather or get more done on the Willy.
 
nomadwilly wrote:Grade A * * ** Fortress. It earns this rating only if one excludes rocky bottoms. On any other bottom I think it's the highest performing anchor in the world. If you had a backup rock anchor (claw or maybe a Delta) you'd have everything coverd. Fortress is excellent at short scope.*****************************************
Eric, I think you're right. I have both Fortress and Bruce on Our Island and have never had any serious issues anchoring. I've sat up during the night on anchor watch a time or two but never have we lost our grip. I mostly use the Bruce, it seems to be the most popular anchor in my area, but when over softer bottom the Fortress holds tight.

*
 
Practical Sailor tests anchors, and has no dog in the fight.
 
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