Another new start for Helmsman

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As a follow up to post #1649, one thing I should have mentioned is that I have “ear muffs” on the engine vents that prevent air flow through the engine room.

We had two straight days and nights of greater than normal fog and rain with readings around 70% humidity with no problems on the boat. The temperatures across four days was a low of 20 (last night which reduced humidity) and highs in the 60’s on the 27th or 28th. Would have been more concerned if it had been summer temperatures. See attachment.
 

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As a follow up to post #1649, one thing I should have mentioned is that I have “ear muffs” on the engine vents that prevent air flow through the engine room.

We had two straight days and nights of greater than normal fog and rain with readings around 70% humidity with no problems on the boat. The temperatures across four days was a low of 20 (last night which reduced humidity) and highs in the 60’s on the 27th or 28th. Would have been more concerned if it had been summer temperatures. See attachment.

Can you expand on "ear muffs". I'm in SoCal, so hadn't imagined the need. I take it the idea is to not cool the engine room any more than it would without a cold draft?
 
Can you expand on "ear muffs". I'm in SoCal, so hadn't imagined the need. I take it the idea is to not cool the engine room any more than it would without a cold draft?

Caballero,

Ear muffs is probably not the most descriptive word! When we had our Bimini completed, we had padded covers made for the engine vents on either side of the boat. It blocks the air flow through the ER during cold periods. Picture is below.
 

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Caballero,

Ear muffs is probably not the most descriptive word! When we had our Bimini completed, we had padded covers made for the engine vents on either side of the boat. It blocks the air flow through the ER during cold periods. Picture is below.

Thanks for the picture. I figured it must be something like that. Is there any reason this might be a problem preventing air intake into the er, or are they removed if anything requiring air intake is operated?
 
Thanks for the picture. I figured it must be something like that. Is there any reason this might be a problem preventing air intake into the er, or are they removed if anything requiring air intake is operated?

The ear muffs are for the cold months. If for some reason, you started the engine or the generator, they would need to be removed.

Next year, I probably won’t winterize the engine or the generator, since it doesn’t seem like it will be necessary based on the results of temperature measurements. I will have the muffs on, though, which will allow the water to keep the ER above freezing.
 
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The ear muffs are for the cold months. If for some reason, you started the engine or the generator, they would need to be removed.

Next year, I probably won’t winterize the engine or the generator, since it doesn’t seem like it will be necessary based on the results of temperature measurements. I will have the muffs on, though, which will allow the water to keep the ER above freezing.

Yes, I like the idea as well. Here in southern California, we don't often go out in the winter, but can easily. It is more likely that we would go down to the boat in the evening and enjoy a cocktail and go home after sunset. It's a relaxing time for us to relax from doing whatever we have been doing for the day, meeting, and having a "debrief". I am loving the diesel heater I installed last year, and we run it for "cocktail hour" when the weather gets frigid, ie. below 60 degrees Fahrenheit. I know. I used to live in Massachusetts, and wore a T-shirt when the weather got above freezing in mid-winter. So, the "ear-muffs" will not likely become a necessary appliance for me, but I hadn't thought to modify the ecosystem of my boat that way.
 
Yes, I like the idea as well. Here in southern California, we don't often go out in the winter, but can easily. It is more likely that we would go down to the boat in the evening and enjoy a cocktail and go home after sunset. It's a relaxing time for us to relax from doing whatever we have been doing for the day, meeting, and having a "debrief". I am loving the diesel heater I installed last year, and we run it for "cocktail hour" when the weather gets frigid, ie. below 60 degrees Fahrenheit. I know. I used to live in Massachusetts, and wore a T-shirt when the weather got above freezing in mid-winter. So, the "ear-muffs" will not likely become a necessary appliance for me, but I hadn't thought to modify the ecosystem of my boat that way.

Southern California has great weather! Massachusetts sees a lot more weather than we do. We spent some of our early married life in Des Moines and then Chicago. That re-defined cold for me!
 
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David,


7) If you haven’t already done so, get a copy of David Pascoe’s terrific book on mid-sized powerboats:

https://www.davidpascoe.com/mid_size_power_boats_chapt6.htm

Most importantly of all, HAVE FUN! Boating is supposed to be all about fun, including the shopping experience. Drive the dealers and brokers crazy with questions and time spent crawling around boats.

Good luck!

Wasn't aware of this one. Just ordered it. Thanks for the tip.
 
We just passed the one year of ownership for the boat. She is ensconced at her home port, and I winterized all of her systems, to be safe. Today was a 65 degree day which is unusual for this time of year here on the Tennessee. I went down to the boat, popped open a beer from the flybridge fridge, and enjoyed the warm weather.

This previous year was a bit of a challenge. Traveling back and forth to the boat while she was in Mississippi, the tornado on the Tennessee, and a bit of an extended lay over in Alabama (a bit self inflicted and a really nice place for a lay over) kept us from fitting the boat out and heading south.

This year we will head to Alabama early in the season, perhaps go to Nashville, via the Tennessee and the Cumberland, head back for the Vol Navy, then go south. We would like to get to the Keys, and then decide if we want to travel over to the Bahamas. I think we will. And, of course, if things line up, meet our western cousins at the rendezvous in May.

What are the plans for the rest of Helmsman family this year?
 
Summer Plans

We are hoping to start North from Port Townsend via the Inside Passage in May. We think we would like to take about 30 days to get to S.E. Alaska and spend about a 45 days there before spending a 30-45 days heading back South to Port Townsend. Plans are tentative for now...

The Seattle Boat Show is this week and after the boat show we are going to start our serious planning for the trip :)

If we are still in town for the rendezvous we would love to meet you Nate!

Rick
 
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We are hoping to start North from Port Townsend via the Inside Passage in May. We think we would like to take about 30 days to get to S.E. Alaska and spend about a 45 days there before spending a 30-45 days heading back South to Port Townsend. Plans are tentative for now...

The Seattle Boat Show is this week and after the boat show we are going to start our serious planning for the trip :)

If we are still in town for the rendezvous we would love to meet you Nate!

Rick

Would be fun!
 
BC and SE Alaska cuising in 2024

We are hoping to start North from Port Townsend via the Inside Passage in May. We think we would like to take about 30 days to get to S.E. Alaska and spend about a 45 days there before spending a 30-45 days heading back South to Port Townsend. Plans are tentative for now...

The Seattle Boat Show is this week and after the boat show we are going to start our serious planning for the trip :)

If we are still in town for the rendezvous we would love to meet you Nate!

Rick

Helmsman will be at the DMS MagnusMaster booth at the Seattle Boat Show. In late April we should be putting our 46 through an exhaustive shakedown in the Puget Sound waters. In late May we're hoping to head north from Port Ludlow. The itinerary isn't set as yet but will be going up the Inside Passage to SE Alaska. We plan to return to Port Ludlow by mid September.
 
Helmsman will be at the DMS MagnusMaster booth at the Seattle Boat Show. In late April we should be putting our 46 through an exhaustive shakedown in the Puget Sound waters. In late May we're hoping to head north from Port Ludlow. The itinerary isn't set as yet but will be going up the Inside Passage to SE Alaska. We plan to return to Port Ludlow by mid September.


Robert, How's things going with the 46? Any new pictures could can share with us? Tom and I just got back from our winter exploration in our camper and now our sights have turned to this summer's cruising. We also plan to head out in May for SE Alaska and return in September. Let's keep in touch it would be fun to see you and all the other Helmsman Family out on the water.
Jill
 
Robert, How's things going with the 46? Any new pictures could can share with us? Tom and I just got back from our winter exploration in our camper and now our sights have turned to this summer's cruising. We also plan to head out in May for SE Alaska and return in September. Let's keep in touch it would be fun to see you and all the other Helmsman Family out on the water.
Jill

It looks more like the 46 will be in Seattle in late May. I don't expect we will be heading north until mid-late June after commissioning and shake down in the Puget Sound. I hope we will cross somewhere in BC waters on your return from SE Alaska. I'm hoping to post some photos shortly, after vetting by Helmsman.
 
Robert, How's things going with the 46? Any new pictures could can share with us? Tom and I just got back from our winter exploration in our camper and now our sights have turned to this summer's cruising. We also plan to head out in May for SE Alaska and return in September. Let's keep in touch it would be fun to see you and all the other Helmsman Family out on the water.
Jill

Here's a comparison of the pilothouse helm: render and actual construction as of a week ago. The other render is the forward view of the PH control station. The 38.4 is the width in inches of the center portion of the control station where the dual MFD's will be mounted. We're working on the placement of the switches and controls currently.
 

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Here's a comparison of the pilothouse helm: render and actual construction as of a week ago. The other render is the forward view of the PH control station. The 38.4 is the width in inches of the center portion of the control station where the dual MFD's will be mounted. We're working on the placement of the switches and controls currently.

I like the additional room for ideal MFD’s. Chevk out Furuno’s new XL monitors. There are some pretty good tools coming with them.
 
Chanprr,

I read that all switches and controls are accessible from the helmsman's seat, good starting point!
A starting point that was also the basis for our design of the steering position.
We may have gone a step further.
To operate everything we don't have to lean forward or stretch, in both armrests are the controls of all equipment, plotters, radar and more, including the control of the rudder and the autopilot.
In two side wings of the steering position, next to the steering seat, is the engine control and bow thruster, all within easy reach.
It gives a lot of peace and sailing comfort, maybe another option for you.

Greeting

Pascal.
 
Chanprr,
I read that all switches and controls are accessible from the helmsman's seat, good starting point!
A starting point that was also the basis for our design of the steering position.
We may have gone a step further.
To operate everything we don't have to lean forward or stretch, in both armrests are the controls of all equipment, plotters, radar and more, including the control of the rudder and the autopilot.
In two side wings of the steering position, next to the steering seat, is the engine control and bow thruster, all within easy reach.
It gives a lot of peace and sailing comfort, maybe another option for you.
Greeting
Pascal.

Pascal: Thanks for your suggestions for the helm controls.
This is the basic design for the instrument panel:
Twin Garmin 8616 MFD's directly in front and center.
Left wing: remote control panels for the genset, watermaker, MagnusMaster twin rotors, hydronic heater, iCom VHF remote handset.
Right wing: switches for all bilge pumps, high water alarm, gauges for water, fuel, waste water, nav and anchor lights, wipers, Garmin VHF remote handset.
The thruster controls, windlass switches, horn, digital engine display/analog engine gauges, ignition switch and engine throttle/shifter will be directly forward of the steering, on an angled panel below the winged instrument panel.
The image shows the size and position of the control panels.
Regards
Robert
 

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Pascal: Thanks for your suggestions for the helm controls.
This is the basic design for the instrument panel:
Twin Garmin 8616 MFD's directly in front and center.
Left wing: remote control panels for the genset, watermaker, MagnusMaster twin rotors, hydronic heater, iCom VHF remote handset.
Right wing: switches for all bilge pumps, high water alarm, gauges for water, fuel, waste water, nav and anchor lights, wipers, Garmin VHF remote handset.
The thruster controls, windlass switches, horn, digital engine display/analog engine gauges, ignition switch and engine throttle/shifter will be directly forward of the steering, on an angled panel below the winged instrument panel.
The image shows the size and position of the control panels.
Regards
Robert

Looks very promising, I'm curious about the reality!!!
 
I think it should work really well. That will be a damn fine boat. You should consider heading south thru the Panama Canal and up the eastern seaboard, the big u followed by the loop and back to the pacific. Lots of inland rivers to explore, too.
 
It is a funny thing, isn’t it? Sitting on a boat that you would have never thought you might own, on a really nice day, de-winterizing and thinking about how much fun this summer will be. We are all lucky to have such a great boat. And lucky to have such a good group of people to share each others adventures with. While not all own a Helmsman, it’s really neat to gain knowledge from so many folks who appreciate a good build!
 
Well, we would like to be sitting on our 46 right now, on the water, but, alas, we will have to wait another few weeks before she arrives. After commissioning we will be cruising the Puget Sound on shakedown, and then points North. She will be a fabulous trawler. All along the build, Van and I have come up with very functional and efficient interior designs. As most of us Helmsman owners know, Scott, Van and the rest of the Helmsman crew are wonderful to work with.
 
Well, we would like to be sitting on our 46 right now, on the water, but, alas, we will have to wait another few weeks before she arrives. After commissioning we will be cruising the Puget Sound on shakedown, and then points North. She will be a fabulous trawler. All along the build, Van and I have come up with very functional and efficient interior designs. As most of us Helmsman owners know, Scott, Van and the rest of the Helmsman crew are wonderful to work with.

Yes they are. They genuinely care about your experience. Down to earth folks that are honest, straight forward, and just kind people. I think it is Lisa Helker! She keeps the men focused on what is important! ?
 
Yes they are. They genuinely care about your experience. Down to earth folks that are honest, straight forward, and just kind people. I think it is Lisa Helker! She keeps the men focused on what is important! ?

In all seriousness, they are great to deal with. And truly do care about their customers.
 
Helmsman v Production Catamaran

The members of the Helmsman "cult" will appreciate this. We chartered a brand new Bali 4.2 for two weeks in French Polynesia. I know that many say the PNW is the world's best cruising ground, but French Polynesia is perhaps the most beautiful we will ever see. We cannot wait to return.

But owning a Helmsman and then spending two weeks on a French production cat meant for a charter fleet made me want to write love letters to our boat. The fit and finish of the cat was pretty bad. The mechanical systems were flimsy, undersized or both. And the design, while lovely in the cabin, turned the staterooms into boiling hot coffins (almost no ventilation! Of course, everything was 85: water temp, air temp, humidity).

Add to that a series of system failures that included (but were not limited to) AC for the cabins and eventually a loss of the impeller & undersized booster pump on the generator and, well, you get the impression. One of the TF members defines cruising as "fixing a boat in exotic places". They most certainly got that right.

Headed up to the boat this weekend to give it a big thank you kiss for being well-built and reliable.
 
The members of the Helmsman "cult" will appreciate this. We chartered a brand new Bali 4.2 for two weeks in French Polynesia. I know that many say the PNW is the world's best cruising ground, but French Polynesia is perhaps the most beautiful we will ever see. We cannot wait to return.

But owning a Helmsman and then spending two weeks on a French production cat meant for a charter fleet made me want to write love letters to our boat. The fit and finish of the cat was pretty bad. The mechanical systems were flimsy, undersized or both. And the design, while lovely in the cabin, turned the staterooms into boiling hot coffins (almost no ventilation! Of course, everything was 85: water temp, air temp, humidity).

Add to that a series of system failures that included (but were not limited to) AC for the cabins and eventually a loss of the impeller & undersized booster pump on the generator and, well, you get the impression. One of the TF members defines cruising as "fixing a boat in exotic places". They most certainly got that right.

Headed up to the boat this weekend to give it a big thank you kiss for being well-built and reliable.

We had the same thing happen in St Marteen on a sail cat. The water maker wouldn’t work and the generator crashed about 4 days in. Pretty miserable trip. We were looking at one boat before we went with a Helmsman. My wife walked on, took one Quick Look around, and after the door knob to the bathroom fell off in her hands, walked by me and a broker and said, I will be in the car! ?

I de-winterized this week and really enjoyed being back on board and getting set up for some cruising.
 
We had the same thing happen in St Marteen on a sail cat. The water maker wouldn’t work and the generator crashed about 4 days in. Pretty miserable trip. We were looking at one boat before we went with a Helmsman. My wife walked on, took one Quick Look around, and after the door knob to the bathroom fell off in her hands, walked by me and a broker and said, I will be in the car! ?

I de-winterized this week and really enjoyed being back on board and getting set up for some cruising.

After seeing your boat in person, I can attest to the fact that your wife was right! So glad to hear you are getting her back out again. It's the one and only Helmsman I've had the pleasure of boarding. Such a beautiful boat. They've figured out how to tick an awful lot of boxes.
 
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