Aging

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If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

What is your age?

  • Are younger than 60?

    Votes: 37 17.1%
  • Are you 60 to 70?

    Votes: 83 38.4%
  • Are you 70 to 80?

    Votes: 85 39.4%
  • Are you 80 to 90?

    Votes: 11 5.1%
  • Are you over 90?

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    216
Keep doing what you want for as long as it is reasonable and safe. My GP says "There are 70 year olds, and there are 70 year olds." Which I interpret as some being fit and active, some stuck in a chair drooling, and everything in between. So far I`m in the first group, but that`s, as said, "so far". It can change fast.
 
We live our lives very consciously, why, because we are confronted with death at an early age.
My nephew, a year younger, died at the age of 21, cancer.
My father, grandfather and great-grandfather all died around the age of sixty, heart attack.
With that experience, we started to look at life differently.
I couldn't work well with my brain, but I could work with my hands.
I discovered by doing everything myself that you could spare/deserve a lot of money.
At the age of twenty, we built our own house completely, including all the furniture, kitchen, you name it.
At that time, we also bought a sunken fiberglass boat and completely refurbished it.
At the age of thirty, when my wife was 26 years old, we decided to build our own boat, the boat we still sail today, thirty-two years later.
When the boat was finished, three years later, we wanted to travel.
We were able to arrange with our employer to go on holiday for 9 to 12 weeks, which we did until our retirement.
At the age of forty-three, I started a four-day work week, also until my retirement.
I retired at the age of sixty, seven and a half years earlier than planned, my wife had already quit earlier.
Moral of the story, we enjoyed our freedom and traveled trips that are reserved for most people when they retire, if you make it.
No one can take this away from us, don't put anything off until tomorrow, Carpe diem!
WHERE THERE'S A WILL THERE'S A WAY!!!

Greeting,

Pascal in Sigrid.
 
It was not necessarily aging issues that led me to sell my wooden GB42 and transition to my current lift-kept fiberglass boat nine years ago, but now in my late 70s it is nice to be able to press a remote button on a fob while in the house and get to the boat as it first touches water and then start up and back out for a day on the water. Coming home, a quick engine flush with freshwater followed by a washdown of the boat from the pier and I am done. I would and could pay for more of the routine maintenance IF there was anybody willing and trustworthy available, but for now all that is easy enough for me. Best part is if I get involved with too much other life events, it's ok for the boat to hang there for months. The boat is willed to my younger brother to sell for the benefit of six nephews and nieces.
 
Greetings,
Mr. dd. Your link aside, many of the infirmities both mental and physical can strike at what you can consider "younger" ages, as well.
I think the crux of the matter is being able to recognize WHEN it's time to hang up the "riding boots" and doing so.


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I’m aware of how life changes regardless of age I just think some humor helps everyone stay young. We here have had to adapt from crazy all alone sailing in places most people dream of to coastal cruising on a motorsailer because of MS the admiral has to have chemo monthly so we are now going to explore populated places on the globe. We adapted and plan to cruise the inside passage this season to be near services unlike our past adventures. That last reach toward the light in the brine is when I’m hanging the boots FACT!
 
Experience and Muscle Memory

I will be turning 75 soon and I have limited experience boating. The learning process has been a challenge. However, I find it stimulating like learning anything new. I have a boating friend with vastly more experience than me and he is three years older and in good physical and mental health. My physical and mental health is holding up at this point. I believe that years of experience can provide that muscle memory that he has and allow him to probably boat longer than me even though he is older.
 
Another Viewpoint

Having recently turned 63 and fortunate enough to have enjoyed boating my entire life I don't plan on slowing down assuming health is not an issue. What i do find myself dealing with as I get older is what type of boating brings the most enjoyment. After many different types of boats including four trawlers, living aboard part time for a few years, learning to sail a smaller boat I now find myself enjoying rowing for exercise as my favorite time on the water. Being out alone with some great music for 90 minutes of continuous exercise is just enjoyable. Designing and building the electric launch is another boating experience I'm enjoying and already sketching up the next boat. Not sure what the future holds but hopefully it will include some type of boating.
John T.
 
I will be turning 75 soon and I have limited experience boating. The learning process has been a challenge. However, I find it stimulating like learning anything new. I have a boating friend with vastly more experience than me and he is three years older and in good physical and mental health. My physical and mental health is holding up at this point. I believe that years of experience can provide that muscle memory that he has and allow him to probably boat longer than me even though he is older.

I think in this case...it's a lot like survival situations....."the will to live".

Most of the time it comes down to a person's willingness (will) to keep going.

Many that have had a lifetime of boating that was much more than just summer weekends with the yearly cruise....may get to a point much earlier in life that they have had enough of owning a big cruising boat and if money is an object...taking care of it. For some that may actually be the reason to KEEP going, they LOVE boat maintenance and that shiny looking treasure. For others that is like a sharp stick in the eye much of the time.

So there's the group that will keep going till they can't and another group that just plainly comes to the conclusion....."good enough" ...because it may just go downhill fast.

So good luck in your quest...it can be a heckuva rewarding one ...if you are careful! :D
 
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No 90+ in the poll here yet. I was sure there would be!
I've read about a couple of 100+ sailors (e.g. sail boaters) here in Sweden!
 
I will turn 82 in a couple of weeks. As long as the body holds up, and the mind is acute, I have no intention of giving up boating. We liveaboard and boating is not just a lifestyle; it is our "life." I have two friends at the marina that are livingaboard, one is 94 the other will be 95 in a couple of weeks. They make me feel young and vital. I just hope I can stay this way for another 10.
 
sooo, just turned 65 a few months ago... I hope to still be able to work for another year and a half or so... As lots of friends on here know, I'm Capt on a 150' ocean going tug... We cross the Atlantic with tows occasionally ( 2 last year towing navy ships).... I have another Navy tow scheduled for this summer to Europe.. Getting harder as I get older but still seems to be doable... A Throat cancer bout took me out of the game for a while.... Just hope I realize when its time to swallow the anchor and stay on the beach...
 
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Don't worry. Your secrets are safe with us here on the Hot Rod forum......Oh, wait.....Am I in the right place?
If you`re on the "Hot Rod" Forum you`re doing fine!
 
No 90+ in the poll here yet. I was sure there would be!
I've read about a couple of 100+ sailors (e.g. sail boaters) here in Sweden!
Today I met a 90 year old boat owner. I suspect the over 80 crowd do not frquent TF to bother posting. JMO

I am urprised by the low numbers under 60
 
I suspect the over 80 crowd do not frquent TF to bother posting. JMO I am urprised by the low numbers under 60


I hadn't thought of that, but I think you must be exactly right on this!
 
I am 67YO and I still work full time (construction management) and I truly enjoy it. It requires mental agility which is becoming less than I once had, but I feel that the stimulation is good for the mind. When I get to the boat (in the midst of a refit) I can still be distracted by all the aspects of the project, but it also forces me to focus on one specific task at a time. It is the respite from my professional life that somehow lets me forget everything associated with my job while still keeping me physically and mentally active. I feel truly fortunate to be able to do both and look forward to keeping on as long as I can. A friends father is still sailing and working on his boat at 95YO, but obviously he is the exception. As Dylan Thomas wrote "Do not go gently into that dark night. Old age should burn and rave against at the close of the day. Rage, rage against the dying of the light."..... Best of luck to everyone still engaged. Keep the faith.
 
This is my philosophy:

“ Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!”
― Hunter S. Thompson
 
This is my philosophy:

“ Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!”
― Hunter S. Thompson
I've tried my best to take that approach.
 
I'm one of the under 60 (53 in May). I had an interesting experience this weekend that I think somewhat applies to this discussion. I visited both my parents and my in-laws this past weekend.

My father (80): No signs of physically or mentally slowing. I still have trouble keeping up with him.

Father-in-law: (76): Barely remembered he was on a cruise 4 weeks ago and couldn't remember any details. "I think I had a good time".

IMHO When is it time to get out?:

When your spouse loses confidence in you.

When you notice having difficulties handling the boat.

When your memory starts to become a challenge.
 
Boy, I agree with the buildup of clutter these days. I got a pilots license in 1970. Now the aspects of flying a plane have not changed, but 50+ years of govt regulations, incredible electronics that can give you way more info than you need to fly the plane, I don't know how anyone can absorb all the info to get a license today. I had 50 years to slowly absorb all this new info. But at 75, I have learned to used filters to only keep in my "working memory" those facts that I need for the present operation, knowing I can go to the computer and pull up the stuff I might need depending on what I am doing. No way can I keep all those facts at the tip of my memory LOL! But that is a fear, when will I not be able to know what I need now and what can I ignore especially for flying a plane. I know many of you have seen someone who is still driving a car and you say to yourself they really shouldn't be driving, yet they can't see it. And then I have a niece who is hounding her dad (88) to stop driving and we drive with him in a 40ft RV and he is great. Age is gonna be different for all of us. Just how our health and brain are still working that makes the difference. I constantly ask myself if the mistake I made is from age or just a minor "brain fart"! We all constantly make mistakes, mostly minor. It's analyzing them and making sure we don't repeat them and that they are not life threatening. Boy, aint life fun?
 
Today I met a 90 year old boat owner. I suspect the over 80 crowd do not frquent TF to bother posting. JMO

I am urprised by the low numbers under 60

This!!! I have pictured your gents as 50s or possibly a few a bit older. It is fabulous to realize (appreciate) how much life experience is freely shared here on TrawlerForum. I am grateful.

B and B were young however I've not seen them of late.

My friend Rich swallowed the anchor recently. He had gifted me an alternator a while back. Like all boaters he had lots of ship stores. I passed along to him a spare solar regulator and inverter a few years later when he was struck by lightning.

This is the alternator he sent me:
55-AlternatorLabel.jpg


Rich was born in 1935. He was one of the boaters at one of my most memorable meals, mentioned in the http://janice142.com/Articles/TimeStopped.html article.
 
This!!! I have pictured your gents as 50s or possibly a few a bit older. It is fabulous to realize (appreciate) how much life experience is freely shared here on TrawlerForum. I am grateful.

B and B were young however I've not seen them of late.

My friend Rich swallowed the anchor recently. He had gifted me an alternator a while back. Like all boaters he had lots of ship stores. I passed along to him a spare solar regulator and inverter a few years later when he was struck by lightning.

This is the alternator he sent me:
55-AlternatorLabel.jpg


Rich was born in 1935. He was one of the boaters at one of my most memorable meals, mentioned in the Time Stopped article janice142 article.

Janice, we gents are all in our 2nd childhood. No wonder you thought we were younger.
 
Boy, I agree with the buildup of clutter these days. I got a pilots license in 1970. Now the aspects of flying a plane have not changed, but 50+ years of govt regulations, incredible electronics that can give you way more info than you need to fly the plane, I don't know how anyone can absorb all the info to get a license today. I had 50 years to slowly absorb all this new info. But at 75, I have learned to used filters to only keep in my "working memory" those facts that I need for the present operation, knowing I can go to the computer and pull up the stuff I might need depending on what I am doing. No way can I keep all those facts at the tip of my memory LOL! But that is a fear, when will I not be able to know what I need now and what can I ignore especially for flying a plane. I know many of you have seen someone who is still driving a car and you say to yourself they really shouldn't be driving, yet they can't see it. And then I have a niece who is hounding her dad (88) to stop driving and we drive with him in a 40ft RV and he is great. Age is gonna be different for all of us. Just how our health and brain are still working that makes the difference. I constantly ask myself if the mistake I made is from age or just a minor "brain fart"! We all constantly make mistakes, mostly minor. It's analyzing them and making sure we don't repeat them and that they are not life threatening. Boy, aint life fun?

==============================


The Guardian has this article yesterday

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2024/mar/25/the-big-idea-why-am-i-so-forgetful

Not sure how valid and correct (clinical and research results) however memory is an ever-present issue.

Tend to agree that memory recall is selective, although I believe our anxiety may magnify the changes.

some excerpts
==============
Every day, people across the planet ask themselves this question, myself included. When we are desperately searching for our glasses, wallet or keys, we might wish to have a photo*graphic memory, but the truth is we are designed to forget.

===================
In fact, the majority of what we experience in a given day is likely to be forgotten in less than 24 hours. And that is a good thing. Think of all the passing encounters with people you will never see again, the times you spend waiting in a queue at the supermarket, and those awkward times when you find yourself looking at the floor while stuck in a crowded elevator. If our brains hoarded away every moment of every experience, we would never be able to find the information we need amid an ever-increasing pile of detritus.
.===================

So, the next time you find yourself wondering “Why am I so forgetful?” perhaps you can take some comfort from the idea that your brain is probably doing just what it evolved to do.
===================================

cheers
All is NOT lost
just misplaced♥️♥️♥️
 
I posted about memory, with questions marks,
Google and the web are not reliable sources for medical opinions
s sort of use it at your own risk.

But I did include my opinion that if I become too attentive to my own shortcomings, the anxiety/fear level increase and then become both self-fulfilling prophecy and increase on mistakes/lapses etc.
 
Saw this from Aussie author/radio presenter/TV host Rove McManus:

"I'm not that old dog grumbling on the front verandah at all the new puppies coming by. I want to be the one that's running around as best I can until my knees give out."

McManus is just over 50!
 
Boy, I agree with the buildup of clutter these days. I got a pilots license in 1970. Now the aspects of flying a plane have not changed, but 50+ years of govt regulations, incredible electronics that can give you way more info than you need to fly the plane, I don't know how anyone can absorb all the info to get a license today. I had 50 years to slowly absorb all this new info. But at 75, I have learned to used filters to only keep in my "working memory" those facts that I need for the present operation, knowing I can go to the computer and pull up the stuff I might need depending on what I am doing. No way can I keep all those facts at the tip of my memory LOL! But that is a fear, when will I not be able to know what I need now and what can I ignore especially for flying a plane. I know many of you have seen someone who is still driving a car and you say to yourself they really shouldn't be driving, yet they can't see it. And then I have a niece who is hounding her dad (88) to stop driving and we drive with him in a 40ft RV and he is great. Age is gonna be different for all of us. Just how our health and brain are still working that makes the difference. I constantly ask myself if the mistake I made is from age or just a minor "brain fart"! We all constantly make mistakes, mostly minor. It's analyzing them and making sure we don't repeat them and that they are not life threatening. Boy, aint life fun?


Good points, however, I find the newer technology in flying more of a help than getting overloaded. I don't have the very latest stuff in my plane, but the GPS mapping, autopilot, ADSB (AIS equilivant) and radios are easy to use to stay on the right path and avoid a collision. Also, take my GF with who is also a pilot. She make sure the gear is down for landing. However, we fly very little now... just enough to stay current.



As for driving, don't drive much at nite and little need to. Don't like to drive anyway. Way too many idiots out there worse than me. Use Uber a lot.
 
This!!! I have pictured your gents as 50s or possibly a few a bit older. It is fabulous to realize (appreciate) how much life experience is freely shared here on TrawlerForum. I am grateful.

B and B were young however I've not seen them of late.

My friend Rich swallowed the anchor recently. He had gifted me an alternator a while back. Like all boaters he had lots of ship stores. I passed along to him a spare solar regulator and inverter a few years later when he was struck by lightning.

This is the alternator he sent me:
55-AlternatorLabel.jpg


Rich was born in 1935. He was one of the boaters at one of my most memorable meals, mentioned in the Time Stopped article janice142 article.
With reference to the term "swallowed the anchor", I prefer that "he cast off for the final voyage."
 
Systems overload can be overcome mostly by training. But it does take training and lots of practice

Aviate, navigate, communicate...the most basic of all training for plots...sorta applies to marine situations as well.

I do agree it got tougher and tougher to stay up with all the regulations through the years. I had not only the FAA but also USCG to regulate my actions.

I find even my best boating friends are woefully unaware of many regulations and even well charted restrictions or prohibitions. I was asked once to accompany 2 experienced boating friends on a delivery through NY harbor after 911. The one who called was pretty upfront saying he knew enough to know he didn't know enough and was probably not great at even finding the info.

So yes, new tech it is a 2 edged sword...more info to digest but gizmos to tell us when possible conflicts (real or regulations) come up.

As I posted before, the new Garmin driving navigational units will put dozens of warning and planning restrictions at you fingertips before you even go and before encountering them while moving.

The right tech should help us if used properly and make up for us that may find so much overwhelming these days.

My trick is not just taking techs word for it...I try and follow up on things that do affect my immediate future and try to ignore the rest
 
With reference to the term "swallowed the anchor", I prefer that "he cast off for the final voyage."

I believed the term meant the travesty of moving off the boat, at least that's what it meant a half century ago. Has the meaning changed? Eek!

My friend Rich is alive and kicking (cataract surgery just last month)
 
I believed the term meant the travesty of moving off the boat, at least that's what it meant a half century ago. Has the meaning changed? Eek!

My friend Rich is alive and kicking (cataract surgery just last month)
That is good news. I clearly misunderstood the meaning.
 
I believed the term meant the travesty of moving off the boat, at least that's what it meant a half century ago. Has the meaning changed? Eek!

My friend Rich is alive and kicking (cataract surgery just last month)

Might be regional, I heard it through recent times, but then again from old timers mostly.

Seems like a lot of sayings, terminology, customs/etiquette are mostly only in the old timers (not all).

Boating in general seems to have shifted (not only my opinion) to an "activity" versus a hobby/passion/way of life....the way it was when I was a kid.
 
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