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Old 08-30-2020, 01:46 PM   #1
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Greenline 39: General Discussion

Now that we have a new, dedicated area for Greenline/Solar/Hybrid discussion, I thought I would start this thread with an eye toward aggregating Greenline 39 discussions that do not fit into any of the other thread categories. Hopefully, this will make it easier for those that might be doing research in the future. Not sure if this type of "organization" will work or not, but will try and see what happens.
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Old 08-31-2020, 07:39 AM   #2
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Deck Layout

The new 39 is a nice, fresh model from Greenline.

If you see a lot of locking in your future, however, there is something you need to consider with regard to the deck layout. See photos and discussion in this thread:

https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/...p-51727-4.html
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Old 02-18-2021, 04:51 PM   #3
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I’m very interested in the Greenline 39. From all I’m seeing and reading, it seems like the right boat for me (port docking not withstanding). But what I’m hearing from people is that, here in California, the electric drive really isn’t strong enough once I’m out of the marina and out to sea. I’m really interested in hearing from owners if they’re able to use the Electric drive sufficiently.
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Old 02-19-2021, 06:34 AM   #4
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Hi DDEvlinJr,


I have had my GL33 Hybrid for going on 11 years now. I have given a GL39 a sea trial, but it was the diesel-only version, which was the only model the dealer had available at the time. Nevertheless, I have studied the GL39 Hybrid a lot, as I had considered trading up at one point. From the electric propulsion performance perspective, there is a reasonable similarity in specs between the two models. As such, you might find my comments and opinions below useful, as you weigh the pros & cons.

I can enjoy 5.5 knots SOG (max electric speed, when fully loaded) for about 90 minutes in calm seas, with little wind and no current. If I travel at 3.5-4.5 knots in similar conditions and it's a fairly sunny day, I'm good for 3-4 hours. On a completely sunny day, I can go 2.1 knots on solar alone (i.e. without drawing the battery down at all). I realize 2.1 knots is not very exciting for most boaters, but it's nice to know it can be done as a "get home" strategy, if the diesel engine should happen to fail.

The keys to enjoying the performance I described above are weather and sea conditions. I spend a lot of time cruising in reasonably protected waters, as well as rivers and canals. For this kind of cruising, electric is a joy. When I travel in more open waters, like the Baltic Sea, electric is not so practical, hence I use diesel. I have no exact measurements for using electric at sea under less-than-ideal conditions, but my experience over the years with this suggests that if you travel under electric power in a ~1 foot chop, with no current and wind coming at you at a speed <7 knots or so, you could expect a SOG of ~4.8 knots for around 90 minutes. Or a SOG of 3.0-4.0 knots for 2.2-3.2 hours before running out of juice. For ~2 seas, I would think the numbers would be ~3.5 knots for 90 minutes our 2.5-3.2 knots for 2-2.5 hours. Not worth the extreme slowness and bother, really. For 3 foot seas on a GL33, I wouldn't dare try it. This is a challenging and uncomfortable ride for a GL33, even when running on diesel. In the event you want to turn 180 degrees and take a following sea for a breather, you need to execute that 180 FAST. This couldn't be done using electric. Being larger, I'm sure a GL39 might be a bit friendlier in 3 foot seas, but I still would not plan on using electric.

One benefit that's rarely discussed in all these hybrid/electric pro & con threads is the fact that a hybrid setup enables the presence of 230/120v house current 24x7 without having to run a generator. I enjoy this benefit just about as much as the silence of cruising on electric. In fact, if the propulsion feature of hybrid were removed, I would still probably buy hybrid again just for the 230/120v house current feature.

I have close to zero awareness of west-coast US weather & sea conditions. From what I read in TF, however, it sounds like the PNW would not be very conducive to electric cruising. Perhaps there is one exception. Fog. Given calm seas, in thick fog, I am always thankful I have the option to move ahead using electric. It gives me a much better possibility to listen for what might be out there.

I see you're from LA...so maybe weather & sea conditions are perpetually better there??? I recommend you try to find a GL39 Hybrid for sea trial.
Good luck with your research!
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Old 02-19-2021, 06:44 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DDevlinJr View Post
(port docking not withstanding).
This implies you read my opinion on this in the other thread. I want to clarify and, perhaps, emphasize that my port deck reservation has to do with taking a GL33 though deep locks -- where if you were in need of standing on the port side during locking, you would risk getting crushed between the roof of the cabin and the lock wall. If you don't see many locks in your future, I wouldn't consider the narrow port deck much of a deterrent -- even for docking.
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Old 02-19-2021, 07:05 AM   #6
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About 2 years ago my wife and I saw the Greenline 39 at the Newport boat show. Its cabin layout was great. We we really liked the boat!

The anchor on the side of the bow was different. But at the time the boat has two big draw backs. Its black water tank is only 20gals.

The big question was, the main battery only had a 5 year warranty. No one and I even contacted Greenline could give me a cost on replacement. So that tossed the thought of buying one right out the window.

Point to the dealer was, if the batteries only last 5 years and the cost is about 10 grand for a new set. And you cant tell me the cost! I can buy a lot of fuel in that time frame and most likely never use over 1 grand of fuel per year vs savings using the electric motor.

Even if the batteries were 5 grand I told him. We only talking about the saving on using the electric motor. I still need to run the main motor. Also the electric motor is always turning. Its in-between the diesel motor and transmission. How much wear is taking place? The up side, no genset.
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Old 02-19-2021, 07:36 AM   #7
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Hi Iggy,


I am quite certain the GL39 uses the same size/capacity battery (i.e. the very same battery) as the GL33 these days. I do not know, however, if the manufacturer and exact model of the battery is the same as what I have in my GL33. Nevertheless, I think you might find my experience below useful...

I had to replace my Kokam 48v 240 AH LiPo battery in early 2019. It was the original from the factory. So, I got about 9 years out of it. Claimed life for this battery, from Greenline, was about 10 years if cared for properly. I always kept my shore power plugged in over the years and the 48v battery was on float (~54 volts). This was for my convenience. If I had gone to the effort of keeping the battery in the 46-50 volt range when the boat was not in use, I probably could have extended my battery life by another year. In any event, if the manufacturer is giving a 5 year warranty now, I think that's GOOD. The warranties were much less in the earlier days.

As to your other question, the replacement cost of my battery, including new case, built in electronics, bms (battery management system - which comes affixed to the top of the battery case), cables and shipping from Slovenia to Sweden came to ~€17,250. I could have done it for about €5000 less by shipping the old battery back to have it rebuilt and reusing the old case and old electronics. I didn't do this, as I was on a pretty tight schedule to depart on a 6 month trip to the Mediterranean one month after the completion of the new battery installation. I did not want to risk surprises from re-using the old electronic components, as the troubleshooting and back and forth would have taken time that I did not have.

I am counting on battery technology moving ahead at warp speed during the coming 10 years and therefore less of a hit on my wallet the next time around ;-)

You can see from these numbers that "saving money on fuel" would not be a very strong argument for going hybrid. There are a lot of other reasons to do it, however. I won't go into it here, but if you search out and read some of my posts, you will understand why I, personally, like hybrid.
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Old 02-19-2021, 07:42 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iggy View Post
Its black water tank is only 20gals.

I wouldn't let this item put you off buying a GL39. It's easily corrected.


The factory-standard blackwater tank on my GL33 is 63L (~17 Gal). This wasn't enough for the type of cruising we wanted to do. So, I eventually had a custom-built ~18 Gal. tank added to the system. Even on the GL33, there's a fair amount of space in the bilge where one can fit such things as this. I could have gone even larger, but I wanted to save enough space for all the other junque I customarily cruise with.
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Old 02-19-2021, 08:52 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottC View Post
Hi Iggy,


I am quite certain the GL39 uses the same size/capacity battery (i.e. the very same battery) as the GL33 these days. I do not know, however, if the manufacturer and exact model of the battery is the same as what I have in my GL33. Nevertheless, I think you might find my experience below useful...

I had to replace my Kokam 48v 240 AH LiPo battery in early 2019. It was the original from the factory. So, I got about 9 years out of it. Claimed life for this battery, from Greenline, was about 10 years if cared for properly. I always kept my shore power plugged in over the years and the 48v battery was on float (~54 volts). This was for my convenience. If I had gone to the effort of keeping the battery in the 46-50 volt range when the boat was not in use, I probably could have extended my battery life by another year. In any event, if the manufacturer is giving a 5 year warranty now, I think that's GOOD. The warranties were much less in the earlier days.

As to your other question, the replacement cost of my battery, including new case, built in electronics, bms (battery management system - which comes affixed to the top of the battery case), cables and shipping from Slovenia to Sweden came to ~€17,250. I could have done it for about €5000 less by shipping the old battery back to have it rebuilt and reusing the old case and old electronics. I didn't do this, as I was on a pretty tight schedule to depart on a 6 month trip to the Mediterranean one month after the completion of the new battery installation. I did not want to risk surprises from re-using the old electronic components, as the troubleshooting and back and forth would have taken time that I did not have.

I am counting on battery technology moving ahead at warp speed during the coming 10 years and therefore less of a hit on my wallet the next time around ;-)

You can see from these numbers that "saving money on fuel" would not be a very strong argument for going hybrid. There are a lot of other reasons to do it, however. I won't go into it here, but if you search out and read some of my posts, you will understand why I, personally, like hybrid.

The other factor in this is that your in Europe. So fuel is twice the price if not more. At 17,000 euro's is about $20,000 U.S. dollars. Which equals to 6,500 gals of fuel here in the U.S. So in 9 years thats 722 gals of fuel. Plus you must add the fuel that was used to run the main engine in that time frame.

The up side to the Greenline and you have not mentioned. No genset to be maintained and the sales said (and we all know salesmen) that the solar system could maintain the battery's 24/7 depending on the weather. A GOOD thing!

Just to point out, I am not trying to put the boat down! If the batteries came with a 10 warranty chances are I would have bought it. But the numbers are not really there if your a U.S. boater.
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Old 02-20-2021, 10:28 AM   #10
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Thank you for the reply

I really appreciate your reply. It’s so helpful to speak with people who have the boat and to get their thoughts and experience


Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottC View Post
Hi DDEvlinJr,


I have had my GL33 Hybrid for going on 11 years now. I have given a GL39 a sea trial, but it was the diesel-only version, which was the only model the dealer had available at the time. Nevertheless, I have studied the GL39 Hybrid a lot, as I had considered trading up at one point. From the electric propulsion performance perspective, there is a reasonable similarity in specs between the two models. As such, you might find my comments and opinions below useful, as you weigh the pros & cons.

I can enjoy 5.5 knots SOG (max electric speed, when fully loaded) for about 90 minutes in calm seas, with little wind and no current. If I travel at 3.5-4.5 knots in similar conditions and it's a fairly sunny day, I'm good for 3-4 hours. On a completely sunny day, I can go 2.1 knots on solar alone (i.e. without drawing the battery down at all). I realize 2.1 knots is not very exciting for most boaters, but it's nice to know it can be done as a "get home" strategy, if the diesel engine should happen to fail.

The keys to enjoying the performance I described above are weather and sea conditions. I spend a lot of time cruising in reasonably protected waters, as well as rivers and canals. For this kind of cruising, electric is a joy. When I travel in more open waters, like the Baltic Sea, electric is not so practical, hence I use diesel. I have no exact measurements for using electric at sea under less-than-ideal conditions, but my experience over the years with this suggests that if you travel under electric power in a ~1 foot chop, with no current and wind coming at you at a speed <7 knots or so, you could expect a SOG of ~4.8 knots for around 90 minutes. Or a SOG of 3.0-4.0 knots for 2.2-3.2 hours before running out of juice. For ~2 seas, I would think the numbers would be ~3.5 knots for 90 minutes our 2.5-3.2 knots for 2-2.5 hours. Not worth the extreme slowness and bother, really. For 3 foot seas on a GL33, I wouldn't dare try it. This is a challenging and uncomfortable ride for a GL33, even when running on diesel. In the event you want to turn 180 degrees and take a following sea for a breather, you need to execute that 180 FAST. This couldn't be done using electric. Being larger, I'm sure a GL39 might be a bit friendlier in 3 foot seas, but I still would not plan on using electric.

One benefit that's rarely discussed in all these hybrid/electric pro & con threads is the fact that a hybrid setup enables the presence of 230/120v house current 24x7 without having to run a generator. I enjoy this benefit just about as much as the silence of cruising on electric. In fact, if the propulsion feature of hybrid were removed, I would still probably buy hybrid again just for the 230/120v house current feature.

I have close to zero awareness of west-coast US weather & sea conditions. From what I read in TF, however, it sounds like the PNW would not be very conducive to electric cruising. Perhaps there is one exception. Fog. Given calm seas, in thick fog, I am always thankful I have the option to move ahead using electric. It gives me a much better possibility to listen for what might be out there.

I see you're from LA...so maybe weather & sea conditions are perpetually better there??? I recommend you try to find a GL39 Hybrid for sea trial.
Good luck with your research!
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Old 03-05-2021, 12:54 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DDevlinJr View Post
I’m very interested in the Greenline 39. From all I’m seeing and reading, it seems like the right boat for me (port docking not withstanding). But what I’m hearing from people is that, here in California, the electric drive really isn’t strong enough once I’m out of the marina and out to sea. I’m really interested in hearing from owners if they’re able to use the Electric drive sufficiently.

After 55years of sailing and voyaging, we bought a '14 GL 33 Hybrid in great condition, fully optioned, and little used on San Fran Bay, and brought her down to Monterey Bay - not the best of places by far for sea state.

As far as the electric motor, it's usable on the open bay with the usual 4-6' NW swell, paticularly whale watching after dieseling out to find them, and actually hearing them blow, sometimes with musical high-pitched sounds. And getting the last few miles back to Monterey Hbr. is almost always downwind. But in the summer, there's a wretched sea breeze that pipes up to 15-20kn w/ 2-3' short wind waves - much like SF Bay, but bigger seas that are often 6-9' when the Pacific high is near. So. Cal. much better, but the Santa Barbara channel can really kick up too, and we were down there Oct. '19 coming back from Avalon when we had a miserable several hours punching into short, steep breaking waves at 6-7kn, throwing spray bow to stern. The boat handled it much better than the passengers, including two teenage grandkids!
We're planning to head back down in April- possibly as far as Oceanside where I have relatives. Currently the elect. motor is out and in process of diagnosis with ScottC's help, I hope, in another thread.
A couple of pics - Avalon on a mooring; and the Admiral in the cockpit in Santa Barbara at the "pink moment" with moonrise;
Attached Thumbnails
P1017031-Proc.jpg   P1016949-Web.jpg  
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Old 03-14-2021, 10:26 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterB40 View Post
After 55years of sailing and voyaging, we bought a '14 GL 33 Hybrid in great condition, fully optioned, and little used on San Fran Bay, and brought her down to Monterey Bay - not the best of places by far for sea state.

As far as the electric motor, it's usable on the open bay with the usual 4-6' NW swell, paticularly whale watching after dieseling out to find them, and actually hearing them blow, sometimes with musical high-pitched sounds. And getting the last few miles back to Monterey Hbr. is almost always downwind. But in the summer, there's a wretched sea breeze that pipes up to 15-20kn w/ 2-3' short wind waves - much like SF Bay, but bigger seas that are often 6-9' when the Pacific high is near. So. Cal. much better, but the Santa Barbara channel can really kick up too, and we were down there Oct. '19 coming back from Avalon when we had a miserable several hours punching into short, steep breaking waves at 6-7kn, throwing spray bow to stern. The boat handled it much better than the passengers, including two teenage grandkids!
We're planning to head back down in April- possibly as far as Oceanside where I have relatives. Currently the elect. motor is out and in process of diagnosis with ScottC's help, I hope, in another thread.
A couple of pics - Avalon on a mooring; and the Admiral in the cockpit in Santa Barbara at the "pink moment" with moonrise;


Beautiful boat!! Thanks for the reply!
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Old 03-14-2021, 01:10 PM   #13
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Beautiful boat!! Thanks for the reply!
Thank you!

Here's another "pink moment with moon-rise" view. The wide full-length "knuckle" hull extensions above the WL allow a fine, sailboat-like entry. And an aft factory view of their "super-displacement" hull that maximizes efficiency up to about 14kn.
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Old 09-04-2021, 01:54 AM   #14
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Gentlemen, the Greenline 39 hybrid caught my eye.

For a 39 foot boat shouldn’t the fuel tank be bigger? I want to cruise with the family from orange county to cabo if possible.

Is it possible to add a larger or supplementary fuel tank? Also, what about expanding the battery capacity?

I love the boat But I just want some longer range flexibility for Baja cruising.
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Old 09-04-2021, 09:27 AM   #15
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Battery….

I don’t know if you can get a larger fuel tank but I bought my GL 40 from Bayport Yachts in Newport Beach and they added an additional battery for me. And it makes a pretty big difference. I’m often able to run for a few hours on electric only and still have 60% plus charge.
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